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April 18, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WNDN ODAY, APRIL 18, 95I THE MICHIGAN DAILY

....

PAGE I

Lemon Hurls
Unearned Tally In Ninth
BreaksUp Pitching Duel i
4'*,u

Two-Hitter

To

Nip

Tigers, 2-1

Recordings of
the Michigan
Union Opera
Available

* * *

Special to The Daily
By TED PAPES
DETROIT-A ninth inning error
by Detroit shortstop Johnny Upon
shattered an air-tight pitching
battle between Cleveland's Bob
Lemon and Hal Newhouser of the
Tigers to earn the Indians a 2-1
victory over their arch rivals in the
1951 opener at Briggs Stadium
yesterday.
A crowd of 43,470 fans in over-
coats and blankets were spell-
bound by the big Cleveland right-
bander's two-hit masterpiece. So
were the Tigers.
* * *
NEWHOUSER was almost as
brilliant on the mound for the los-
ers as he recovered from an un-
steady first inning to shackle the
Tribe while nursing a 1-1 tie until
the fatal ninth.
Larry Doby opened that frame
for Cleveland by blasting a 3-2
pitch off the screen in right field
for a double. Bob Kennedy sacri-
fit~ed him to third and New-
houser was in serious trouble.
With Ray Boone at bat he
worked the count down to the'
limit again. Boone then slashed
two vicious fouls down the left
field line but 'Prince Hal' curved a
third strike past him and it looked
like the crisis was over with catch-
er Jim Hegan next at the plate.
* * *
HEGAN RAPPED a routine
grounder to Lipon who braced
himself for the play, only to let
the ball slip off his glove to the
right. He picked it up and dropped
it again as Doby scampered home
with the winning run and Hegan
pulled up safely on first.
Cleveland opened the contest
with a rash of hits but could
score only one run. After Dale
.1itchell had led off with a fly
to left, Bobby Avila crossed up
the Tiger infield with a perfect
bunt. Newhouser was tardy in
fielding the ball and then fired
it into right field for an error,
Avila moving to second.
Big Luke Easter drilled a sharp
single through the hole between
first and second with Avila rac-
ing around to score the game's
first run. Rosen singled to center
sending Easter to second, and
when Doby's wind -blown fly
dropped between the Tiger out-
fielders the bases were loaded.
Classes Offered
For Fishermen
Campus Izaak Waltons will get
a chance to brush up on their
angling techniques with the open-
ing of the Physical Education De-
partment's fly and bait casting
classes.
Classes will be held on Monday
and Wednesday or Tuesday and
Thursday at two, three and four
o'clock at Waterman Gym. All
necessary equipment will be fur-
nished.
Interested students should ap-
ply sometime this week at room
4, Waterman Gym.

Kennedy then banged one
brack to Newhouser who tossed
to catcher Joe Ginsberg forcing
Easter at the plate. Ginsberg's
relay to first was in time to
complete the double play and
end the threat.
Detroit tied it up in the third
inning when Jerry Priddy doubled
down the right field line, moved to
third on Ginsberg's roller to the
pitcher and stole home as Lemon
threw wild to the catcher.
Priddy got the only other safety
off Lemon, a fifth inning single.
Cleveland collected a total of eight
hits from Newhouser who was
brilliant in the clutch all after-
noon.
O * * aY
OPENING DA Y GAMES:-*

BOB LEMON

.. . a flying start

Yanks Blank Bosox 5-0
As Raschi, Jensen Star

By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-Yankee Vic Ras-
chi turned Boston's annual April
pennant winners into "the same
old Red Sox" yesterday with a
flashy six-hit, shutout 5-0 victory
for New York's defending world
champs.
While 44,860 fans watched, the
talented Yankee righthander rode
home behind a seven-hit attack
that routed Willie Wight in the
sixth inning.
Jackie Jensen, playing left
field in place of limping Hank
Bauer, smashed a two-run hom-
er in the third for the first
scores of the game. His double
to right field in the sixth start-
ed Wight on the way to the-
showers.
All the scoring was wrapped up
nearly in two innings-the third
and sixth. Jensen's homer fol-
lowed a single by Jerry Coleman,
ensen's double in the sixth was
followed by a sacrifice bunt by
Phil Rizzuto on which all hands
were safe.
Then came successive run-scor-
ing singles by Mantle, Joe Di-
Maggio and Yogi Berra. Ellis
Kinder replaced Wight but the
damage was done.
* * *
GIANTS 4, BRAVES 0
BOSTON - Larry Jansen fash-
ioned a frigid, sparkling five-hit-
ter to send the New York Giants
away winging with a National
League opening day victory over
the Boston Braves, 4 to 0.
This was the first time the
Giants won an opener since 1936,
and it was Jansen's first victory
in four opening-day attempts. A
blustery wind and 50 degree tem-
perature held the crowd to only
6,081 paid.
* * *
PHILLIES 5, DODGERS 2
BROOKLYN-Robin Roberts re-
turned to his field of triumph,
pitching the defending champion
Philadelphia Phils to a 5-2 victory
over Brooklyn to dampen the

Dodgers' home inaugural before
19,217 disappointed and winter-
frocked Ebbets Field fans.
Roberts got the necessary hit-
ting support from Del Ennis, Mike
Goliat and Dick Sisler, the same
trio that proved so troublesome to
the Dodgers last year.
CUBS 8, REDS 3
CHICAGO-First sacker Dee
Fondy belted a bases-loaded triple
in his first major league time at
bat to launch the Chicago Cubs
to an 8-3 win over the loosely-
playing Cincinnati Reds before a
Wrigley Field opening day crowd
of 18,211.
Only three Chicago runs were
earned as the Reds committed five
errors behind four pitchers, in-
cluding starter Ken Raffensberg-
er, 1950 nemesis of the Cubs,
* * *
PIRATES 5, CARDS 4
PITTSBURGH - Southpaw Bill
Werle put out the fire again. The
Pittsburgh Pirates took the St.
Louis Cardinals 5-4 before 25,894
chilled fans at Forbes Field.
Little Murry Dickson, who start-
ed for the Pirates, helped his own
cause in the fourth inning with
his first major League home run.
WHITE SOX 17, BROWNS 3
' ST. LOUIS-Chicago-s revamp-
ed White Sox pounded five pitch-
ers for 19 hits and ran roughshod
over the St. Louis Browns for a
17-3 victory before a slim turnout
of 5,660 in the opening day game
at Sportsman's Park. The Browns
pitchers yielded 14 bases on balls,
Lefthander Billy Pierce went the
full distance and kept ten Brownie
hits well scattered as the White
Sox continued the mastery dem-
onstrated by nine straight exhi-
bition triumphs over the Browns
this spring.
** *
SENATORS 6, A'S 1
PHILADELPHIA - C a t c h e r
Mickey Grasso blasted a three run
homer and Cuban pitcher Con-
rado Marrero tossed a neat seven
hitter last night to give the Wash-
ington Senators a 6 to 1 victory
over the Philadelphia Athletics in
the first night opener in Ameri-
can League history.
TODAY'S GAMES AND PITCHERS
- AMERICAN LEAGUE -
Boston at New York-Taylor (2-0) vs
Lopat (18-8).
Washington at Philadelphia (night)-
Hudson (14-4) vs Brissie (7-19).
Chicago at St. Louis (night)-Kret-
low (0-2) vs Widmar (7-15).
Cleveland at Detroit-Wynn (18-8) vs.
Trout (13-5).
- NATIONAL LEAGUE -
New York at Boston-Maglie (18-4)
vs Sain (20-13).
Philadelphia at Brooklyn - Church
(8-6) vs Roe (19-11).
(Only games scheduled)

'M' Golfers
Play Detroit
HereToday~
Four Veterans Head
Experienced Squad
If the weatherman permits,
Michigan's golf team will face the
University of Detroit's Titans in
the Wolverine's first home engage-
ment of the season this afternoon
at 1 p.m. on the University links
in Ann Arbor.
The Wolverines, despite two
losses on their Southern trip, last
week, have shown great potentiali-
ties. Four of the top six men on
the Michigan squad are veterans
and all are capable of near-par
performances.
THE VETERANS who are avail-
able for the meet today are Bob
Olson, Dean Lind, Dick Evans
and John Fraser. Together with
two newcomers, Hugh Wright and
Lowell LeClair, they are expected
to start against the Detroit links-
men.
LeClair is the brother of one
of last year's golfers, Keith Le-
Clair. Last year Keith shot a 72
(even par) which was good
enough to decisively defeat his
Detroit opponent. Lowell is a
sophomore and is also expected
to contribute much to the Wol-
verine cause.
The Titans were defeated in Ann
Arbor last April by a decisive 19%/2-
7%1 score. At that time Bob Olson,
Michigan's number one man shot a
sizzling 69 to lead the Michigan
men to victory.
OLSON'S OPPONENT of last
year, Sam Kocsis, will not be play-
ing this .time. He graduated last
June.
The Wolverines, who finished
third in the Conference last year,
will have their last chance for non-
conference competition against the
Titans. Their next meet will be a
quadrangular affair with Purdue,
Indiana, Ohio State and Michigan
at Columbus.
Rain Washes'
(I
Out 'M' Game
Michigan was deprived of its last
tune-up before opening defense of
its Big Ten baseball title when un-
favorable weather conditions
forced cancellation of the home
season opener against Wayne Uni-
versity yesterday.
Coach Ray Fisher expressed
doubt that the contest will be re-
scheduled. The teams will meet at
Wayne on May 1.
While the Wolverines have six
games under their belts already,
Fisher wanted to give his squad
another test before meeting Ili-
nois, perennial Conference base-
ball power, in a two-game series
here this Friday and Saturday.
In place of the game that was
frozen out yesterday the Wolver-
ines went through a long intra-
squad contest, but it was too cold
to give the players an adequate
workout of the type that Fisher
had hoped for before sending them
against the Illini.
; ! ll..{T::4; :nT
a,,:.: ~i: r'"i: ai."r.nw4n. ".,"." 'il . .

By GEORGE FLINT
When death claimed Michigan's
immortal center, Adolph (Ger-
many) Schulz, last Saturday, it
closed an important chapter in the
annals of college football.
The defensive bulwark of Field-
ing H. Yost's "lean years" at the
Wolverine helm, Schulz was named
to the All-American team selected
by Walter Camp in 1907. Camp
considered him the greatest cen-
ter of them all.
SO DID the nation's 'ports-
writers in 1951. They named him
at center for the all-time All-
American football team, along
with another Michigan great,
present coach Bennie Oosterbaan.
A tremendous tackler, Schulz
built the strength of a lion into
his 6' 4", 240-pound frame while
working in a steel mill in Fort
Wayne, Indiana. When he came
to Michigan in 1904, he quickly
earned a place on the varsity.
Schulz is credited with introduc-
ing a new concept into defensive
football. Back in the game's
dawning days, linemen played on
the line of defense, with only the
backfield men as secondary.
* * *
ONE DAY the titanic Schulz

pulled out of the line and used his
huge frame as a battering ram as
he roved back and forth behind his
forward wall to pick up plays as
they were directed to one side of
the line or the other.
Since then linebacking has
been a regular part of the grid
sport, and there have been few
of the clan to match the mighty
Germany.
He played five seasons for
Yost's men, in a day when eligibili-
ty rules were casual in the ulti-
mate.
* * *
PROF. DONAL HAINES of the
Department of Journalism saw
Schulz play when a student here.
He says of the Wolverine great:
"Schulz was a giant. So large and
so invulnerable that you were used
to seeing Schulz left standing
while everyone else was on the
ground."
According to Prof. Haines,
Schulz' finest performance came in
a losing battle with National
Champion Pennsylvania in 1908.
His mighty efforts stalled the
Quaker offense almost single-
HE

A LL-TIME ALL-AMERICAN:
Schulz' Grid Legend Comes to Close

"I

Now

LAST THREE DAYS
TO MAKE YOUR
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APRIL 20-28
Reservations must be paid for by Friday noon.
HILLEL FOUNDATION AT LANE HALL... 3-4129

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handedly to hold it scoreless
through the first half.
His first injury caught up with
him in the second half and sent
him to the sidelines and his team
to defeat.
That 'spelled finis to the active
footballing career of the mighty
Germany. He coached for a few
years at Tulane University, where
he also served as athletic director.
He later entered the insurance
business in Detroit, where he re-
sided until his death at Henry
Ford Hospital there.
1e:

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Sigma Nu 14, Tau Kappa Epsilon 0
Phi sigma Kappa 4, Pi Lambda Phi 1
Delta Tau Delta 11, Phi Kappa Tau 1
Alpha Sigma Phi 18, Tau Delta Phi 0
Lambda Chi Alpha 10, Delta Kappa
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Phi Kappa Epsilon 8, Zeta Psi 7
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STANLEY CUP HOCKEY
Toronto 2, Montreal 1 (overtime)

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