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April 17, 1951 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-17

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SIX ;

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

T-1J SDAY, AMIL 17, 1951

TOP POLICEFIREMEN:

I

LOOK and LISTEN
... with Harry Reed

Horowitz

? , -
. p

Another sign of the nation'stwas Phil Regan, a little known

.obilization program is the way
dio stars and shows are turning
service camp entertainment
gain.
One of the earliest to go camp-
opping for the men in uniform
3anel Chosen
or AirShow
Gov. G. Mennen Williams and
ensis Likert, director of the Uni-
ersity's Institute of Social Re-
mrch, have been named as
eakers on the panel of "Amer-
a's Town Meeting of the Air"
hich is scheduled to originate
,pril 24 from Rackham Lecture
[all.
Leonard Chase, chairman of the
nn Arbor Town Meeting Hosts
ommittee announced the two
ould take part in the discussion
Are We Afraid of the Atomic
omb?" and said that other
;eakers would be named in the
year future.
The program will be presented
nder the auspices of the Phoenix
roject and the Ann Arbor Junior
'hamber of Commerce. It will be
roadcast over WHRV and 286
etwork affiliated stations.

singer and master of ceremonies.
IHe began his Armed Services
Show several months ago, and has
been taking his 40 entertainers
around the country conducting
serviceman talent hunts.
NOW THE bigger stars are be-
gining to climb on the bandwagon,
with Bob Hope and Horace Heidt
leading the way. Hope led Hedy
Lamarr and Frankie Laine to the
Naval Base at Coronado, California
for his show last week, and tonight
it will come from the Marine Base
at Barstow, Calif., at 9 p.m. over
WWJ with Ezio Pinza and Marilyn
Maxwell as guest joy-spreaders.
After a stint at the Palladium in
London, Hope plans to tour Ameri-
can bases in Europe. It's beginning
to look like the home front stars
of radio and pictures are going to
live up to the excellent standard
they set during the last war.
HENRY MORGAN'S "Great
Talent Hunt" folded the other
night, with a weird assortment of
stilt dancers and squealing bi-
cycle pumps,sbut so far everything
about his new show which begins
Friday is strictly on the QT. This
last venture was typical of the
short-lived offerings of the come-
dian.

To Perform
Tomorrow
Vladimir Horowitz, whose Jan-
uary Choral Union Series concert
was postponed becouse of illness
will perform at 8:30 p.m. tomor-
row in Hill Auditorium.
Theartist has recovered and has
resumed his concert tour which
will mark his 20th season in the
United States.
HOROWITZ, born in Russia in
1904, won wide public acclaim and
began to receive critical recogni-
tion in 1926 when he played his
first recital outside of his native
country.
He made his American debut
with the Philharmonic Sym-
phony Orchestra in 1928 and
since that time has made his
home in the United States.
His program for tomorrow's per-
formance has been rearranged
since his illness. It will now in-
clude: "Sonata in E-flat major,
Op. 78" by Haydn; "Intermezzo in
B-flat minor" by Brahms and
"Pictures at an Exhibition" by
Moussorgsky.
Four works by Chopin will com-
plete the program. They are:
"Polonaise - Fantaisie. Op. 61,"
"Barcarolle, Op. 60." "Nocturne in
F minor, Op. 55" and "Scherzo in
B minor, Op. 20, No. 1."

Janitors to Earn More
ThanCivil Employes

-Daily-Jack Bergstrom
SHADES OF FLORIDA--The virtues of a Southern vacation were
well displayed by Gail Cook, '53, right, when she matched arms
with Katie Schultz, '53, who stayed home in the cold north.
Budget Request Faces
Tough Going in Lansing

Janitors in Ann Arbor's schools
will soon be able to earn more for
a year's work than a member of
the police or fire departments.
Public school building and
ground employes last week had
their wage scales upped so that
by next year a janitor with five
years on the job can be earning
$3,800 a year. A maintainence man
can receive $4,300.
TOP PAY for a man on the beat
after four years service is $3,694 a
year for a 48-hour week. Firemen
earn as much as $3,552.
Student, Group
Slates 'Fiuan'
For Weekend
The musical fantasy, "Finian's
Rainbow," will be presented by the
Student Players Thursday, Friday
and Saturday in Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
Heading the large cast will be
Vivian Milan, 151M as Sharon
McLonergan; Ken Rosen, as
Sharon's father Finian; Paul
Hines, '51 as Woody Mahoney;
Nancy Philbin, '52SM, as "Susan
the Silent," Woody's sister; and
John Waller, '51, as Og, the lepre-
chaun.
THE STORY is about an old
Irishman and his daughter who
have come - to America to bury a
leprechaun's crock of gold at Fort
Knox. They become involved in
the troubles of share-croppers in
the mythical state of Missitucky,
and help to pay an overdue mort-
gage.
Much of the play consists of
dancing and singing, and popu-
lar songs such as "Devil Moon,"
and "How Are Things in Glocca
Morra" are in the score.
Tickets are priced at 90 cents
and $1.20 for the evening per-
formances, and at'74 and 90 cents
for the Saturday matinee. There
are only limited' seats remaining
for the evening shows on Friday
and Saturday.

Ann Arbor city officials feel,
however, that police and firemen
are adequately paid.
Although city council president
Cecil Crealhsaid yesterday that
these men should be paid as much
as school janitors, he noted that
they rank well in comparison with
state cities of Ann Arbor's size.
AND ALDERMAN John S. Dob-
son pointed out that the police and
fire situation has been made less
serious by recent pay hikes.
"Many people - do not consider
that these men receive a 10 per;
cent payment for pension when
they complain of low wages for
these services."
Dobson also said that many
policemen quit to find jobs as plant
protection men with Detroit auto
firms, and then come back when
they find they were better off here.
Of course police and firemen can
work their way up into higher pay-
ing administrative jobs.
Flu Check Found
Discovery of a chemical that
stops the growth of influenza virus
in a test tube has been reported by
Prof. W. Wilbur Ackerman of the
public health school.
He indicated however that the
research results do not offer any
immediate method for treating in-
fluenza in human beings.

(Continued from Page 1)

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- Ito accept a restricted budget, per-
sonnel will probably be the hardest
Arts Clu Thit.Wages and salaries amount to
80 per cent of the operating costs.
" Last year the remaining 20 per
Dkiscu$SsPlayIcent, which represents fixed costs,
absorbed the expense of rising
The Ars Theatre Club will hold prices and limited appropriations.
The ls heate Cub wll old This means that any adidition-
its third audience participation
discussion following the presenta-;
tion of "The Recruiting Officer" *
at 8 p.m. tomorrow. ,ir S et
The play, a restoration comedy,
will be evaluated and analysed, For Ton i t
and present methods of army re-
cruiting will be compared to those#
portrayed in the play. The Campbell Case Club will
Prof. Norman E. Nelson of the run a freshman trial case at 7:30
English department will be the p.m. today in Rm. 3KL of the
moderator. Also attending the Union to test student reaction to
discussion will be Prof. Donald R. evening hearings of Case Club
Pearce of the English department, trials.
and a local recruiting officer. "We've begun the evening trials
in the belief that more students

al cut in funds will be ireflected
in a reduction in the size of the
faculty and non-faculty staffs.
President Alexander G. Ruth-
ven declared at the time Gov. Wil-
liams submitted his recompended
$13,700,000 request to the Legisla-
ture that he foresaw a "drastic re-
duction in teaching and service
personnel" if the request was ap-
proved.
This personnel reduction will hit
hardest among the faculty not en-
joying tenure benefits.
The bleak future prospects make
it difficult to attract new' people
into the junior ranks of the Uni-
versity faculty. And it is from
these young people, the teaching
fellows and instructors, that the
future University professors are se-
lected.
Seniors Can Buy
Graduation Notices
Senior class graduation an'
nouncements and invitations will
be sold to seniors of the literary
college, the engineering college,
the business school and the edu-
cation school frorp 2 to 5 p.m.
tomorrow through Friday in the
lobby of the Administration Build-
ing.
Seniors from other schools and
colleges can buy their invitations
and announcements at their re-
spective school offices.

Businiess Careers
VIA
COLLEGE
4-MONTH INTENSIVE COURSE
SECRETARIAL TRAINING for
COLLEGE STUDENTS and GRADUATES
Starting June, October, February
Bulletin A, on request.
Registration now open.
NEXT COURSE STARTS JUNE It
Lifetime Placement Service
Write Admission Counselor
Co-Eduwation a l G. I.Approvd
THE GREGG COLLEGE
87 South Wabash Avenue, Chicago 3, Illinois
Phone STate 2-2880

I

THE BIKINI MODEL "SWIM" SUIT

HAS LOST ITS
POPULARITY-

BUT...

Summer Courses
University of Madrid
Study and Travel
A rare opportunity to enjoy mem-
orable experiences in learning and
living! For students, teachers,
others yet to discover fascinating,
historical Spain. Courses include
Spanish language, art and cuture..
Interesting recreational program
included.
For details, write now to
SPANISH STUDENT TOURS, INC.
500 Fifth Ave., New York 18, N.Y.

will be free to attend cases given
at night," Tom Walsh, '51L, Case
Club publicity chairman, asserted.
"Most of the cases run in the
present freshman competition will
still be held at 4:15 in Law School
class rooms," Walsh said. "But if
we get a good turn-out at the eve-
ning trial in the Union this week,
we'll hold a great many more
there next year."
il Cage Club trials are open to
the public. A list of each day's
trials are posted on the bulletin
board in Hutchins Hall.

S.S. VOLEN DAM
"Thrifty" Co-ed Student Sailing;.

earn
or rrwr
thISoSmrer!
College Students I Discover the
opportunity that is waiting for
you with CiinncaT, America's
Famous Child-Guidance Plan!
You Can Earn $1,000 or more in
your summer vacation doing this
easy, pleasant work-and you'll
gain professional selling experi-
ence that will be of priceless value
to you in later years.!
Hundreds of College Students
just like you have turned their
vacations into profits this1inter.
esting way! We try to arrange for
you to work wherever you prefer
-far away, or right in your own
home town.
Your Success in life depends
largely on selling-even if it's only
selling a prospective employer on
your ability. Representing Child.
craft gives you an unusual oppor.
tunity to learn selling under the
guidance of sales experts.
WeGive You Free Training and
expert assistance. You cannot do
this work our way and fail! So if
you want to be $1,000 or more
ahead next fall and gain valuable
selling experience, write for fur.
ther details today! Address
L. S. REID
Box 6139, Chicago 80, I.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results
--4
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J°c0a ffr y f
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THIS CHEWY,
CHOCOLATY CANDY
IS GETTING MORE
POPULAR EACH YEAR

LIKE THOUSANDS OF AMERICA'S STUDENTS-
MAKE THIS MILDNESS TEST YOURSELF AND GET

join the student group this summer
to Rotterdam on the S. S. VOLEN-
DAM, host to over 4000 students on
three annual sailings since 1948. Re.
turn sailing September 5 from
Rotterdam.
Dormitory type accommodations.
Plenty of deck space. Large, public
rooms. Good and plentiful menu.
High standards of Dutch seaman-
ship, cleanliness, and traditional
friendliness.

Staff of20 distinguished Earopew
and Americas lecturers, under the
joint direcsienof Netherlands Office.
for Foreign Student Relations and
U. S. National Student Association
offer a comprebensive Orientation
Program enroute.
$3O ORound Trip for dormitory-
type space. $320 for mul-
tiple-berth cabins for
women.
Applications from bona fide college
students only ae being accepted by

WHAT EVERY
SMOKER WANTS

NETHERLANDS OFFICE FOR FOREIGN STUDENT RELATIONS
29 Broadway. New York 6, N. Y.
Agents for the Ministerie van Verkeer en Waterstaat
(Directorate-General of Shipping) The Hague. Netherlands

ILDNESS

Co-op
Unive
uso

Cnrin,
" "'"'In Tucson, ;Arizona, the Co-oi

NO UNPLEASANT AFTER-TASTE

p on

OVER 1500 PROMINENT TOBACCO GROWERS
SAY: "When I apply the standard tobacco growers'

A WELL-KNOWN INDUSTRIAL RESEARCH
ORGANIZATION REPORTS: "Chesterfield is the

the campus is a favorite student
gathering spot. At the Co-op-

I

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