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April 03, 1951 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-04-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, APRIL 3, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WAGE MF

T~lE MTCH(~AN flA1.i..1E 1

__

FACULTY MEMBER
Students Meei
League Get-Togethers
Over Coffee, Cookies
Marked by Informality
Coffee and cookies, professors
and students-these are the in-
gredients the student-faculty cof-
fee hour committee uses to make
informal get-togethers for both
the students and faculty on cam-
pus.
The student-faculty coffee hour
is held at 4 p.m. every other week
in the Grand Rapids Room on the
second floor of the League. At
each coffee hour one or two de-
partments of the university are
honored.
THE BUSINESS administration
faculty will be feted on April 18,
and all the departments of the
natural sciences will be honored
on May 2, when, weather per-
mitting, the coffee hour will be
held outside on the League lawn.
Informality is the keynote of
all the coffee hours. Students
have an opportunity to talk to
their professors over a bridge
table or while listening to re-
corded music.
"The professors always come in
full force, but the students are
the ones who shy away," said Pat
Olson, chairman of the commit-
tee.

zS

FETED:

t Professors at Coffee Hours

Favorite Gem
Sign of April
Diamonds Valued
For Brilliance, Color
By JO KETELHUT
With engagement parties be-
coming more prevalent on campus
with the arrival of the spring sea-
son, a mention of April's birth-
stone-the diamond-seems parti-
cularly appropriate.
In legend the diamond is credit-
ed with bringing the wearer ma-
terial good luck and marital hap-
piness. As far back as the history
of the diamond ring can be tra-
ced, it has been the emblem of
purity as well as of a plighted
troth.
*-*
YT ITS natural state the gem
seems merely a charming, curi-
1-0y napect stone, occasionally
surface-frosted. It takes skillful
cutting to reveal the unusual light
of the stone.
In cutting the stones, gem
experts cut many faces, or fa-
cets, so that brilliance and pris-
**-4;- colors will be reflected,
giving the diamond its great
ana sparkle.
All diamonds are crystallized
carbon and are, chemically, the
simplest of all gems. A fine gem
diamond is as clear in color as a
drop of the purest water.

SEW AND SAVE:
Patterns, Materials Available
For Making Spring Wardrobes

I

OUT
Entire Stock of
LEATHER GOODS
40N o 0 of f
Bill Folds Brief Cases
Key Cases - Zipper Binders
Coin Purses Dressing Cases
--- EXCELLENT VALUES

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
TEA TIME-Connie Brizman pours coffee for Prof. Gerome Kam-
rowski of the fine arts department and Harry Newman '52 at the
student faculty coffee hour held March 28 in the Grand Rapids
Room of the League.

*

*

TO ILLUSTRATE how enthu-
siastic the professors are, Miss Ol-
sen pointed out that several fa-
culty members of the fine arts
department dismissed their classes
to allow their students to attend
a recentget-together.
The purpose of the coffee
hours is to give the students an
opportunity to meet their pro-
fessors and other members+ of
the faculty on a strictly in-
formal basis.
Miss Olsen said that is a won-
derful chance for a student to

find out first hand about a course>
he is contemplating taking.
* *C *
ASSEMBLY and Panhellenic
Associations and the Union com-
bine to sponsor the student-fa-
culty coffee hours. In past years
the Union and League held their
own separate coffee hours, but
this year they combined so that
better facilities could be used.
The central committee, under
the leadership of Miss Olsen, is

composed of Harvey Howard,
Harry Newman, Renee Pregul-
man and Diana Khowry.
Among the students, serving
as hosts and hostesses are Connie
Brizman, Mary Jo Perry, Charles
McAlpine and Joan Pierce. Patri-
cia Reed from the League Under-

graduate Office
to the group.

serves as advisorI

Any Type of.
QUALITY PRINTING
LOWER PRICES!
- DOWNTOWN
307 North Main Street
Everything Automatic
a Card to a Catalog by Push-button
GET OUR PRICES FIRST!
FAST SERVICE

WAA Notices]
Badminton Tournament - All
those still playing in the tourna-
ment are screduled to play at 7:15
p.m. tomorrow at Waterman Gym-
nasium.
* * *
Athletic Managers Meeting -
Managers will meet at 5 p.m. Wed-
nesday in the Fencing Room at
Barbour Gymnasium.
Softball team application blanks
for the tournament will be turned
in and managers will receive in-
structions about the tournament.
Lantern Night procedures will
also be discussed and explained.
Eleanor Doersam requests that
managers attend or send a sub-i
stitute because the meeting is im-'
portant.

DIAMONDS WHICH are entire-
ly diffused with color such as deep
blue, red, pink, violet and green
are rare. The deep canary yellow
diamonds, and those of black,
brown and other such shades are.
>very seldom found.
Like nature, no diamond is
absolutely perfect, for if it is
very highly magnified, the mi-
croscope will reveal in every dia-
mond some works of nature's
formation of the original ma-
terial.
Diamonds are the hardest of all
substances, and are the result of
centuries of great pressures exert-
ed on organic materials.
* * *
INDIA WAS the center of the
diamond world for hundreds of
years. Then South Africa and now
South America have become im-
portant diamond areas.
Except in India, the diamond
was practically restricted to the
adornment of kings until early in
the fifteenth century, when fa-
shionable ladies of the Western
world discovered its allure as per-
sonal ornamentation.
Although large stones are rare,
there are several gems which be-
cause of their size and brilliance
have become world-famous.
Excelsior, discovered at Jagers-
fontein, South Africa in 1893,
weighed 96912 carats uncut. It
was later cut in ten smaller stones,
ranging in size from 13 to 68 car-.
ats.

By KATE RADOVAN
"It's time for a change!"
Spring rains definitely assure
one of the end of a long winter,
and cause coeds to begin worrying
about spring outfits.
* * *
WITH AN eye on the weather
change and a hand clasping a slim
pocketbook, the wise college wo-
man will take advantage of the
forthcoming spring vacation to
build a new wardrobe.
Most department stores are
now featuring a wide selection
of light-weight fabrics, and
have received a new stock of
springfashion patterns.
Materials ranging from linen
muicGroups
Initiate Coeds,
Elect Officers
SIGMA ALPHA IOTA.. .
Alpha Chapter of Sigma Alpha
Iota, professional music fraternity
for women, recently held its initi-
ation service in the Hussey Room
of the League.
Those who were initiated were:
Mary Bailey, '51; Mary Ballard,
'52; Kathleen Bond, '53; Julia
Hennig, '52; Bernadyne Logan,
'51; Janet Evans Owlet, '52; Jus-
tine Votypka, '52; Carol Wilkey,
'53 and Edith Zickerman, '52.
A business meeting was held
March 26 in the Garden Room of
the League. The following offi-
cers were elected for the coming
year: President, Marilyn Palm;
Vice-President, Guinevere Dorn;
Corresponding Secretary, Janet
Evans Owlet; Recording Secretary,
Mary Ballard.
The list continues with Alumni
Secretary, Joan Hunsicker; Treas-
urer, Joan Patrick; Chaplain,
Kathleen Bond; Editor, Carol Wil-
key and Sergeant-at-Arms, Nancy
Symmonds.
TAU BETA SIGMA ...
Lambda Chapter of Tau Beta
Sigma, Honorary Band Fraternity
for women, recently held its elec-
tion of officers at Harris Hall.
Those who were elected for the
coming year are: Beverly Short,
President; Joan Patrick, Vice-
President; Irene Edwards, Secre-
tary and Nancy Symmonds, Treas-
urer.
Ruthven Student Tea
Slated for Tomorrow
Students may attend the regu-
lar Ruthven Tea which will be
held from 4 to 6 p.m. tomorrow
in the Ruthven residence.
Honored guests at the tea will
be members of Chi Phi, Psi Upsi-
lon, Sigma Delta Tau, Wenley
House and Jordan Hall.

and gabardine suiting to filmy or-
gandy may be purchased. Print-
ed cottons and silks, pique, broad-
cloth, chambray, faille and rayon
have proven to be favorite fabrics
in past years.
* * *
PATTERNS today are easy to
follow and even the coed with lit-
tle sewing ability can turn out an,
almost professional looking gar-
ment-and at about half the cost.
One of the main concerns in
picking out a design will be to
choose one which is suitable.
The button-front dress has pro-
ven its practicality because it
is easily laundered.
Striped materials, especially in
cool colors such as blue and green,
are slimming as well as "sum-
mery." Open necked dresses tied
with a soft bow of matching fab-
ric will affect a V-shaped 'line.
LINEN OR chambray will make
a simply cut dress with scalloped
collar and pockets which may be
worn to classes.
For travelling or theater wear,
a sophisticated button-down-
the-side fashion is appropriate.
The collar is high and buttoned
at the side and the design is
sleeveless.
Puckered cutton, which requires
no ironing, may be made into a
low-necked, V-cut, sleeveless par-
ty outfit.
* * *
A BRAND-NEW cotton cloth
woven to look tucked all over is
suggested for a square-necked sun
dress with a short-sleeved waist-
length bolero.
Two other styles which allow for
sun tanning are the print halter
dress with bolero and the round-
neck back-wrapped creation which
closes with a low V-back and three
buttons below the waist.
Spring formal woes may be al-
leviated by making a drifting eve-
ning dress of silk organza. A tri-
angular midriff front with shirred
bodice and high back with a
straight-cut across the neckline is
suggested.

115
Libe
OPEN 8:30-5:30 DAILY

minimum

50C

Read and Use Daily Classifieds

r

I

A LAUN -RY SERVICE

12c.each additional pound
All your clothing laundered,
FLUFF DRIED and NEATLY FOLDED
LOW EXTRA CHARGE-
for finishing these articles
SH I RTS, additional ...... ....17c
(Full dress shirts and silk or wool sport
shirts slightly higher)
HANDKERCHIEFS ........... 3c
SOX pr .. . .. ... .. .. . ... .. . .. 3c
just Phone 23-123
Varsity Laundry will
PICK UP and DELIVER

for men

,tndle

I

West
rty St.

NTow..

! :
f i.
I rr
:J.':
Jyi
'
Y:'
fi!
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of
I.Y
. :
^v1i
%l"

I

SAVINGS
INSURED TO
10, 000
by Federal Savings and
Loan Insurance Corpora.
tion. Open an account
with any amount. Earn
2% current rate.

I

I

Remember
HER on
MOTHIER'S
DAY
with a PORTRAIT
she will cherish!

-t

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

HILLEL FOUNDATION

PASSOVER-SEDORIM MEALS

APRIL 20-28

Palmer

&uaiio

LUNCHES and DINNERS

116 North Fourth Ave.
Opposite Court House
Phone 2-2549
Assets Over $15,000,000

SPRING VACATION
Take some of these Spring and Summer dresses

served at LANE HALL

208 Michigan Theater Bldg.
Phone 2-2072

MAKE YOUR RESERVATION NOW... PHONE 3-4129

KOX

i

re. .......+

...

SIZES
9-15,
10-40,
12-24

s

For Vacation ...
For the Bride . . .
There are suits to wear under your coat
now, to wear in June. Suits with smooth
lines, with skirts of gentle fullness or
slim straight lines.
100% wool gabardines, twills, crepes,
checks . . . from 39.95.
Pure silk shantung . . . from 19.95
Rondelle's Sildoni, a silk and acetate
combination shantung . . . at 29.95.

\

I

ATTENTION
SENIORS!

with you at vacation time.
classes and on dattes.
There are Silk Prints, Shan-
tungs, Failles, Gabardines.
In Navy, Black, Jewel tones
and Pastels. Sizes 7-15,
10-20.
3 WONDERFUL GROUPS
Values to $35.00
COAT and SUIT
SPECIALS

Wear them later to.
'K

0 so

7

Order Your

CAPS and GOWNS
NOW!

Ji

II

4

No Deposit Required

I

11 -4%66,

II

El

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