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March 29, 1951 - Image 6

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Michigan Daily, 1951-03-29

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SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 29, 19SI

SIX THWRSDAY, MARCH 29, 1951

URLESQUE, CURCUS SPOT:
Ann Arbor Boasts Long Theatre History,

* * *

* * *

* * *

(Editor's Note: This is the first of<>
;wo stories on the history of the the-
tre in Ann Arbor.)
By CHUCK ELLIOTT
Though the Arts Theatre Club is
he first permanent theatre to be
rganized in the city, Ann Arbor
as been a theatrically inclined
wn for more than a hundred

From the 1830s when the city
as little more than a village, to
e advent of the motion picture
a, Ann Arbor was a name well-
own to travelling dramatic
oupes, circuses, vaudeville
wads, and other "entertain-
ents."
'* * *
THE FIRST recorded local thea-
cal attempts took place in 1837,
ien the Ann Arbor Thespian So-
ety was organized. This was a
irely amateur effort, made up of
out twenty men and women of
e village.
This burst of interest appears
o have been only temporary as
he group went out of existence
few months afterwards.
In July, 1841, the Bowery Am-
iitheatre Circus turned up in
wn for the first time. It adver-
ed, among other attractions,
Vr. Lipman, the Vaulting Pheno-
enon, who has actually thrown 71
mersetts at one trial, the greatest
at on record."
Although the townspeople liked
well enough to applaud its re-
rn the folowing year, the Bowery
rcus drew healthy blasts from
nth the local press (" . . . it is
aking even more serious our
:isting state of penury") and the
resbyterian church (for under-
Lining local morals).
* * *
DURING 'tHE 'forties, theatri-
ls of one sort or another were
it on in Chauncey Goodrich's
n, located on the courthouse
fare about where the YMCA
illding stands now. Most of these
ere staffed with home talent, but
a occasional professional troupe
oud stop by for a short stand.
Perhaps it was the success of
hese plays that inspired two
rentlemen named Ellis and
Parker to build a theatre here
luring the summer of 1850. It
eated from 1500 to 2000 spec-
ators, and was- reported well-
itended during September, the'
inly month that year in which
it operated.
There is no record of the Ellis-
arker theatre operating in the

Pianist Will
Perform in
IU'Concert
Percy Grainger, internationally
known pianist and composer, will
appear as featured guest soloist
with the University Symphony
Band when it presents its annual
Spring Concert at 8:30 p.m. Wed-
nesday in Hill Auditorium.
Grainger will play the first
movement of Grieg's "Concerto in
A Minor" and will conduct the
playing of his own composition,
"Hill Song, No. 2."
* * *
A SELF-TAUGHT composer,
Grainger does not follow the tradi-
tion of the "old masters" in style
and technique. Instead he has giv-
en his attention largely to the folk
music of the many countries he has
visited.
He has toured America several
times, and has also made re-
peated visits to Europe, Australia
and South Africa.
The program will also in-
clude Bach's "Toccata and Fugue
in D minor," Goldman's "Echoe
Waltz," Gragnier's "La Dame De
Coeur," Handel's "Water Music
Suite," Strauss's "Phaeton," Vidal's
"Fanfare," Skinner's "The Shawl
Dance," and the first movement of
Borodin's "Second Symphony."
Admission is complimentary.

OLD OPERA HOUSE-This picture taken in 1892, shows the Athens Opera House Building (on the
far right). Built in 1871, the second floor theatre was for 35 years the center of theatrical activity
in Ann Arbor. The picture was taken looking south on Main from the corner of Ann.
* * * *

Dean Rusk, Assistant Secretary
of State for Far Eastern Affairs,
wil speak at 4:15 p.m. today in
Rackham Amphitheatre.
Rusk, who is slated to address
the two day session of the Foreign
Policy Association in Detroit this
week, will speak here on "Funda-
mentals of our Foreign Policy."
JOINING the State Department
in 1946, Rusk was appointed to his
present post last year. He has also
served within the department as
assistant director of International
Security Affairs and chief of the
Office of United Nations Affairs.
Rusk was an alternate repre-
sentative on the U.S. delegation
to the second and third sessions
of the United Nations General
Assembly in 1947 and 1948.
He has also held the upper level
positions of deputy Under Secre-
tary of State and Assistant Secre-
tary of War.-
* * *
DURING THE WAR the far east
expert served in military intelli-
gence and in the Third Infantry
Division. He later became deputyk
chief of staff for U.S. Army forces
in the China-Burma-India theatre.
Rusk, a graduate of Davidsont
College attended Oxford Uni-
versity as a Rhodes scholar and1
was faculty dean of Mills Col-l
lege, California, before entering
the service.
The secretary's Ann Arbor ap-1
pearance is being sponsored joint-
ly by the political science depart-1
ment, the Ann Arbor chapter of
the League of Women Voters and
the local branch of the American
Association of University Women.
Pharmacists
To Meet Here
"Opportunities in Pharmacy"
will highlight the student branch
convention of the American Phar-
maceutical Association to be held
April 15, 16 and 17 in Ann Arbor.
Specialists in pharmacy and re-
lated fields will address the group
and lead discussions during the
convention. On Tuesday morning,
April 17, visiting students will tour
the facilities of the pharmacy
school, and Health Service and
University Hospital pharmacy
facilities.

FAR EAST EXPERT:
Rusk To Discuss Basis
Of U.S. Foreign Policy

* * *

DEAN RUSK
... Assistant Secretary of State
Murray Seeks
Senir Dues
All seniors who failed to pay
their $1 class dues at fall registra-
tion have been requested to do so
by Chuck Murray, '51, senior class
president.
Dues may be paid from 1:30 to
4:30 p.m. today in the Administra-
tion Bldg.
Most of the money collected will
be used for a gift for the Univer-
sity, Murray said.

'U Seech
Clinic Camp
Will Reopen
Shady Trails camp, tle Universi-
ty's pioneer project in speech
retraining, will celebrate its twen-
tieth season when it opens June 25.
Located on the shores of Grand
Traverse Bay, the camp provides
speech improvement courses for
90 boys and men from the ages of
eight through 24. It was the' first
to apply the summer camp atmos-
phere to curing speech difficulties.
John Clancy, assistant to the di-
rector of the Speech Clinic, found-
ed the camp in 1932 as a non-profit
venture affiliated with the Uni-
versity, and the University ac-
quired the camp in 1949 through
a gift from the Kresge Foundation.
It is operated in cooperation with
the Speech Clinic and the Depart-
ment of Speech.
Boys with stuttering, lisping,
voice problems, mild cerebral palsy,
and post-operative palate problems
attend classes and participate in
specialized recreation and varied
programs in speech improvement
during the eight week stay at
Shady Trails.
Applications are still being ac-
cepted at the Speech Clinic for
this summer's program, which will
run from June 25 until August 18.

k i

ik

wintertime, probably because there
was no way to heat it. However, the
next summer it was going again,
running one of the most spectacu-
lar shows ever to hit Ann Arbor.
Billed as "The Druids" it was an
additional attraction,to the regu-
lar play. The Peninsular Courier
ran the ad: " . . . an aggregation
which plays most eloquent music
from four instruments composed
of seventy oxhorns, dressed in cos-
tume of the ancient Druidical
priests and Bards of Britain.'
ABOUT THIS TIME, the novelty
shows and comic pieces began to
take precedence over the plays
themselves. Such things as "Prof.
DeGray Bennie's Show: featuring
Md'lle OCEANA; the great Ameri-
can danseuse,' and "Yankee Robin-
son's Double Show-The Great
MORAL EXHIBITION! For the
era we live in!" took over so thor-
oughly that only one play--"Uncle
Ton9's Cabin"-was produced be-
tween 1852 and 1860.
In 1860, Hangsterfer's Hall was
built, and while not primarily a,
theatre building, It served better

f

than anything that had preceded

II

Garg Sales

1

A:

it.
The morals of the actors were
not all that could be desired by the
strait-laced inhabitants of Ann Ar-
bor. During a shaw by a team
called Whiston, MacEvoy, and
Goodall, in 1862, Whiston came on-
stage reeling drunk.
He no sooner began to mumble
his lines than he stumbled, knock-
ing over both the oil lamps light-
ing the stage and the scenery. The
flames were doused quickly, but
comment in the newspapers went
on for days.
THEATRE had a great boost af-
ter the Civil War was over. Hough's
Triple Show came to town for a
long run, featuring "Uncle Tom's
Cabin," "Ten Nights in a Bar
Room," and "The French Spy."
It was about this time, in 1867,
that the Peninsular Courier ran
the following item: "The plea-
sure of those attending ... has
been greatly enhanced by the
good order, preserved by Deputy
Marshal Geo. W. Effner. We
hope that those- unruly spirits
who have heretofore had things
their own way at public en-
tertainments are permanently
squelched."
But good order was not all that
was desired by critical University
students. In 1870, a writer in the
Chronicle (predecessor to The
Daily) remarked ". . . The only
dramatic entertainments now wit-
nessed in Ann Arbor are the out-
rageous burlesques given by wan-
dering minstrel troupes."
He advocated the establishment
of a campus dramatic club, and the
shortlived Shakespeare Club was
formed. They altered "The Mer-
chant of Venice" to exclude the
women, but interest waned, and
the club folded.
In 1871, the city got its first
full-fledged permanent theatre
building when G. D. Hill built the
fine new Athens Opera House.
(To be concluded)

Old-Fashioned Grocery Store
To Shut Doors After- 75 Years
U -rRS O$ TC~f ~f4

The Garg sold nearly 4000 copies
in spite of the rainy weather
yesterday, Peg Nimz, '53, Garg
staffer has announced. There are
a few issues left at local drug
stores, she said.

>c) . =>oc-=>o c>)c =mi) tX =ca=> 010 =s{
A.eM df
Mother's Day Gifts, Pro.
grams and Favors, Tradi- c
tional Mugs, Tee Shirts,
and Stationery for Spring.
Why not order them BE-
FORE you leave for Spring
Vacation. -
Delivery will be faster, service will be better, V
and you'll be doing us a big favor.
-Tom and Meredith Suckling V
" P.S. Just phone 3-1733 if you wish, and an
Balfour representative will call at your chapter.
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. University Phone 3-1733 O
tm:' } ?) "t) }lOm t} nCo<- "'1) =- a ft

McLean's grocery, t h e only
Campus Town market which still
retains many of the aspects of an
old-fashioned general store, will
cease to be a State St. landmark
within three months.
Warren D. McLean, 79 years old,
has nnounced that the store will
be closed in 90 days and leased to
a medical equipment sales com-
pany.
* * *
THE GROCERY has been at its
State St. location under one man-
agement or another for the past
Campus
Calenclar
Events Today
A PHOTOGRAPHIC exhibition,
"Sculpture Lesson," is currently
being displayed from 8 a.m. to 10
p.m. in the exhibition corridor on
the ground floor of the Architec-
ture building.
The pitcures show William Zor-
ach, American sculptor, demon-
strating the basic steps in modeling
clay and casting.
HAROLD WELCH, of the Chrys-
ler Corp. engineering laboratory,
wil speak at 8 p.m. in the Archi-
tecture Auditorium on Chrysler's
new 180 horsepower engine.
* * *
PROF. FRANK NOTESTEIN, of
Princeton University, will lecture
on "Population Problems in Under-
developed Areas" at 8 p.m. in Rm.
131 Business Administration Build-
ing.
** *
ARTHUR D. KAHN, former
American Military Government of-
ficial in Germany, will discuss
"The Betrayal of the Denazifica-
tion Program," at 8 p.m. in the
League.

75 years. McLean has operated
the store since 1915.
He has been in the grocery
business for 65 years, and al-
though the store has taken on
many characteristics of a mod-
ern, self-serve market, he still
takes pride in having his shelves
stocked with odd goods that are
not found elsewhere in town.
"We have managed to keep per-
sonal sales methods that were
found in the good old days too,"
he mused.
MOST OF McLeans' memories
are pleasant ones filled with "lots
of friends." But the old store has
had its tragic moments.
In 1943, a 24-year-old baker died
from a blast that occurred in the
bakery of theplace. And two fires
in the store have resulted in the
loss of some $90,000 and complete
remodeling of the building.
The store's leasers will remodel
it again at a cost of $8,000. It
will have a new front, floor, and
room adjustments.
Most of the building will be used
for storage space although some
room will be allotted for a medical
supplies sales area.

CORRECTION!
Many people think of the CRAFT PRESS as "BIG" Printers.
Although it is true that we print many books, catalogues, publica-
tions and work of a similar nature we also have a very efficient
jobbing department which prints PROGRAMS, TICKETS, EN-
VELOPES, STATIONERY, POSTERS, STATEMENTS, CARDS,
HANDBILLS, etc.
Try us'on that next order. Our prices and service are sure
to please you.
Campus Printers for over 30 years
TIHE CRAFT PRESS
330 Maynard Street Phone 8805

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

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ROY REID
Proprietor

Prices Effective Thursday,
Friday, Saturday
We Reserve the Right To Limit
Quantities.

PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S * PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S *

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CHICAGO COLLEGE of
OPTOMETRY
Fully Accredited
An Outstanding College in
a Splendid Profession
Entrance requirement thirty
semester hours of credits in
specified courses. Advanced
standing granted for addi-
tional L. A. credits in speci-
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Registration Now Open
Excellent clinical facilities,
Recreational and athletic ac-
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350 Belden Ave.
CHICAGO 14, ILLINOIS

11

Coming Event:
CONGRESSMAN Walter H.
Judd will give a talk on "The
Meaning of Events in the Far
East," at 8 p.m. Sunday at the
First Methodist Church, State and
Huron. The speech will be followed
by a discussion period.

1

-J
'Q
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.Q

100 McKESSON
ASPIRIN ANTISEPTIC SOLUTION
5 Grain AMMONIATED Tooth Powder
9c BOTH*...53c

=W%.

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SHAMPC

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MILK OF
MAGNESIA
2 for 53C

TALL CANS
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2for23c
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JUMBO
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39c

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New Operatic Releases

III

on P

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PUCCINI: GIRL OF THE GOLDEN WEST
Complete Opera

Cetra 1215
17.85
Cetra 1214
17.85

18th Year
65-80 Day Bicycle Tours from $465
74 Day French Study Tour $775
56 Day Motor Tours - from $1090
Including Round Trip Steamship
from New York or Montreal.

14

CIMAROSA: THE SECRET MARRIAGE
Complete Opera

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SPECDA
WAN
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7 oz.

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Pints Quarts 1/2 Gal.
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Full
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VERDI: DON CARLO, EXCERPTS
Bjorling, Merrill, etc.

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59c

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Paradichlor-
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1128
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DRUGS
25c Bottle
MERCUROCHROME 9c
39c GLYCERIN
SUPPOSITORIES 19C
16 oz. BICARBONATE
OF SODA2 c

TOILETRIES
45c LISTERINE
TOOTH PASTE 2for 59C
$1.19 HELENE CURTIS
Suave Hair Dress & Shampoo 89c
Reg. $1.25 COTY FACE POWDER
Plus 2 tubes Lipstick all for "
An.. M'WAYFA cIbJECREAMA 29C

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MOZART: COSI FAN TUTTE, EXCERPTS
Glyndebourne Festival Co.

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