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March 27, 1951 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-03-27

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TUESDAY, MARCH 27, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY'

THE MICHI2AN-..IL.

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Size Worries
Are Alleviated
By Fashioners
Designers Consider
Fabric, Length, Style
For Figure Flattery
Whatever size or figure prob-
lems the modern woman might
have, designers have worked out
fashions to show her off to the
best advantage.
There are half-size fashions for
the mature figure, junior petites
for the very tiny, and junior or
misses for those in between.
A MATURE FIGURE is charac-
terized by a short waist and full
hips. For this type of figure half
size fashions are recommended.
Trimly becoming to this type of
figure is the soft suit dress with
belted jacket in dazzling white and
dark checks.
The solid skirt is slim but
easy; the material may be a
crease-resistant rayon suiting.
Also being shown for the ma-
ture figure is a pleated coat dress
of a sheer nylon and rayon ma-
terial. The neckline is filled in
with a detachable white birds-eye
pique dickey.
BUTTONS TO the hem will also
help create that "long look" which
is flattering to the woman who
wears a half-size. Narrow stripes
that are diagonally worked can
help to make the waist look nar-
row.
The woman who takes a
misses size will probably have a
long waist and medium hips.
Flattering to this type of a fig-,
ur'e is a dress similar to the one
recently designed for Spring. This
slim suit dress of silk shantung has
covered buttons to emphasize the
arched hipline. It comes in gray,
black, navy, or toast with a scarf
to give bright accent at the neck.
For the misses sized woman is
a slender sleeveless silk print,
dress that is piped and belted with
velvet, under a wool jersey redin-
gote that is elasticized at the
waist.
A short tiny waist, small figure,
yet fuller hips is characteristic of
the woman who wears a junior
size
A narrow coat dress of checked
rayon taffeta in black, navy or
brown and white is a recent de-
sign that looks well on the woman
with the junior figure.
Junior petites are for the very
tiny, wispy figure.
A flat hipped full skirt of un-
pressed pleats can be worn very
easily by this type.

SUIT SEASON-This navy and white checked suit, worn by Lou
Boonstra, ,'53, is suitable for almost any occasion. Topped off
with a navy velveteen hat, highlighted by white gloves and blouse,
it features the fashionable angle-pocket and single button. The
soft line of the jacket follows the trend of feminine lines over
shoulders and hips.
A LONG FIGHT WON:
VWars, Depression Aid Women

B-i
Businiess Careers
E VIA -{
THE )COLLEGE
4-MONTH INTENSIVE COURSE
SECRETARIAL TRAINING for
COLLEGE STUDENTS and GRADUATES
Starting June, October, February
Bulleti A, on request.
Registration now open.
NEXT COURSE STARTS JUNE 11
Lifetime Placement Service
Write Admission Counselor
Co-Educational * G, IL Approved
THE GREGG COLLEGE
89 South Wabash Avenug, Chicago 3, Illinois
Phone Slate 2-lt SO

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In Fight To 'W
(Editor's Note-This is the second
in a seies of articles concerning
careers fbr women. The job op-
portunities in retailing which are
being offered to the college graduate
will be discussed in a following arti-
cle.)
By JO KETELHUT
Spring and summer vacations
are times when many campus co-
eds join the saleswomen's ranks,
which are about a million and a
half now.
A job in retailing can also be
the prospect of a rewarding and
promising career for the coed who
has just graduated from college
and is looking for a beginning in
the climb to an executive position.
* * *
A STUDY OF WOMEN'S rise in
retailing during the past century
shows the progress they have
made in making the saleswoman
one of the most important figures
in that trade.
Three wars and an economic
depression have given women
the opportunity to demonstrate
their capacities and abilities as
significant cogs in turning the
wheels of industry-and sales-
clerking is not a small part of
their achievements.
If a coed had spent her vaca-
tions working as a salesgirl in the
1850's, she would have led a busy
and highly regimented life with
little time for social engagements
and relaxation from classroom at-
mosphere.
HER SELLING DAY would have
begun at 6 z .m., but that did not

Sales

mean rising at 5:30 a.m. and mak-
ing a mad dash for the bus. For
before the store opened she was
expected to sweep the floor, dust
the counters and showcases, trim
and fill the lamps and bring in
a pail of water and another of
coal.
A day's work usually lasted
until*9 p.m., and then the time
was the salesclerk's own-ex-
cept that her employer quite
often required her attendance at
both church and prayer meet-
ing.
If the employer discovered she
was going to dances or other
places of amusement, he usually
concluded that she was a pretty
shady character and her services
were no longer required.
* * *
PAY WAS $3 or $4 a week as a
beginner and a raise to $7 a week
might be offered if the salesgirl
proved outstanding.
And if a coed had worked as
a salesgirl in the 1850's, she
would have been a distinct rar-
ity.
The great majority of clerks
then were men, and when an oc-
casional daring pioneer first hired
women to wait on his customers,,
there were those who predicted
dire results.
Women replaced the patriotic
men who went off to join the
armies of the Civil War.
In New York, R. H. Macy start-
ed the rise by promoting two of
his saleswomen to store superin-
tendent and buyer. As the 20th
century came into view, all
through the country women were
gaining recognition in retailing.
Once again, it was war which
helped the woman's status. In
1917 and 1918, women were called
into retailing in vastly increased
numbers. Salaries doubled, store
hours shortened, and women were
accepted in executive positions
permanently.
The first World War added an-
other new concept to retailing-
the idea that fashion might be in-
corporated into ready-to-wear.
With this addition, a whole new
range of jobs opened up for wo-
men.
Both college-trained women and
others were invited to join execu-
tive training programs, and col-
leges and universities began offer-
ing courses in retailing, marketing
and merchandising.

Jobs

Colds Plague
Coeds, Beauty
Extra Care Advised
By Beauty Experts
The spring of the year is a time
when women are plagued with the
common cold, and thus the beauty
of the skin, kyes, nails and hair
is sometimes damaged.
To guard against noticeable evi-
dences of a cold, special care has
to be given. Hair which has be-
come dirty and oily from lack of
a recent shampoo, can be fresh-
ened up by brushing. Bristles may
be packed with gauze for stripping
oil from hair.
AS A TEMPORARY grooming
measure until the hair can be
safely washed, a dry shampoo
such ashcorndmeal or table salt
is useful. The, technique of using
the dry shampoo, is to shake it in
and brush it out. To rid the scalp
of any powdery sediment after
brushing, a dab of cotton can be
dampened with rubbing alcohol
and rubbed on the hair.
To take attention away from
a nose that is in distress, one
make-up expert says a bright
red lipstick and more cheek
rouge than is usually worn
should be used.
An opaque foundation and face
powder in the individual's normal
tint will also help to conceal many
evidences of a miserable cold.
* * *
A FOUNDATION which is sug-
gesged by many experts to cover
the flaming nose and pale face is
one which comes in cream-stick
form. The advantage of using this
tinted make-up cream that swivels
out of a stick and can be carried
handy in a purse is that it can
be used for touch ups over an ex-
isting make-up.
To aid dry skin brought on
by a cold, the- use of a rich
emollient is advised for face,
hands and nails by most skin
specialists.
More than ever, a night cream
that will keep parched skin from
breaking out into rough patches
should be used.
A GOOD IDEA is to wear over-
night gloves, cover the hands with
lotion and swab the cuticles.
Eyes that are attacked by a
cold will feel and look better if
they are bathed in eye lotion
or are soothed by compresses,
dipped into lotion.
If the eyes are red and puffy
so that they need camouflage, the
use of eye-shadow is suggested by
beauty experts.
Mascara worn at this time
should be of the water-proof kind
and confined to the upper lashes.
By following a few simple di-
rections when a cold strikes, nei-
ther beauty nor morale need be
damaged.
Cage Play-off
Set forTonight
Some may think that the bas-
ketball season is over; however,
there is a challenge game sched-
uled for today.
The WAA basketball tourna-
ment is officially over, but the
first place winner of the 'B' tour-
nament has the right to challenge
the runner-up of the 'A' tourna-
ment. If the challengers win this
game, they may go on and play
the official first place team of the
tourney.
This has happened. The 'B'
tournament winners of Angell

House have called the Helen New-
berry team which holds second
place to play today.
The game will be played off at
5:10 p.m. today at Barbour Gym-
nasium.
If the game is lost by the chal-
lengers, Angell House, tournament
status will remain unchanged.
However, should they win, they
will have the right to challenge
the first place team of Kappa
Kappa Gamma and will have a
chance to take over the lead po-
sition.
Since all those teams playing
in the 'B' tournament lost their
first game, the winner assumes
the third place in the all-campus
tournament. Also, since this team
may not have played either of the
first of second place teams, this
right to challenge is awarded to
them.

ELAINE THAYER JOAN YOUNG
* * * *. * *

Thayer-McMillan
Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd A. Jones of
Bath, New York announce the en-
gagement of their daughter, Patri-
cia Elaine Thayer, to Donald Wil-
liam McMillan, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Donald P. McMillan of Flint,
Michigan.
Miss Thayer is a junior in lit-
erary college and is majoring in
zoology. She is a pledge of Delta
Zeta sorority.
Mr. McMillan, a graduate of the
University literary college, is a
junior in the School of Medicine.
He is affiliated with the Phi Rho
Sigma fraternity.
Wedding plans are indefinite.
Frosh Women
Begin Working
On FirstEvent
Women of the class of '54 are
currently hard at work preparing
for their first campus project,
Frosh Weekend, which will be pre-
sented Friday and Saturday, April
27 and 28 in the League Ballroom.
This all campus event originated
two years ago with the purpose of
initiating freshmen women into
League activities. Since that time,
the affair has become an annual
event with each night's dance be-
ing sponsored by a different team.
The two groups, the Maize and
Blue, draw to decide which night
their respective dance will be held.
From that time on, the teams work
independent of each other.
In keeping with the competitive
spirit of the affair, the teams se-
lect their individual themes, and
then begin preparing for their
dance. Both the decorations and
floorshow follow the theme of the
dance.
The name of the winning team
is then engraved on a plaque
which hangs in the Undergraduate
Office of the League.

Young-Seedy
Joan Kimball Young's engage-
ment to Carrol Alan Leedy, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Carroll E. Leedy of
Pleasantville, N. Y. has been an-
nounced by her parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Floyd L. Young of Vincennes,
Ind.
A senior in the education school,
Miss Young is affiliated with the
Alpha Omicron Pi sorority.
Mr. Leedy is a member of the
Sigma Nu fraternity and a senior
in the engine school.
The wedding will be held on
June 23.
* * *
Palmer-Wilbur
Mr. and Mrs. Allen W. Palmer
of Pontiac have announced the
engagement of their daughter,
Marilyn Doris, to Irvin Matthew
Wilbur of Flint.
The betrothal was revealed Eas-
ter Sunday.
Both Mr. Wilbur and Miss Pal-
mer were graduated from the en-
gineering school last June. Mr.
Wilbur is doing graduate work in
the School of Business Adminis-
tration.
No definite date has been set
for the wedding.
WAA Notices
Badminton Club-Members will
meet for the last meeting of the
year from 7 to 9 p.m. tomorrow
at Waterman Gymnasium.
* * *
Badminton Tournament-Parti-
cipants will play tomorrow at Wa-
terman Gymnasium. Those whose
last names begin with A through
D will play at 7:30 p.m.; E through
G at 8:15 p.m.; H through J at 8
p.m.; K through R at 8:30 p.m.;
S through Y at 7:45 p.m.
* * *
Michifish-Members will con-
tinue swimming at the same times.

I

As advertised by Lassie in SEVENTEEN
CRISP, PLAID TAFFETA accents the scarfs, brightens the
linings of these smart young coats in MARAJAH, finest 100%
Virgin Wool Crepe. In Grey or Beige only. Sizes 7 to 15.

WEDDING BELLS: Spring Formal Dresses Utilize
Parents Reveal Engagements Future, Past--Familiar, Exotic

F

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3995

SCHOOL OF THE DANCE
Connecticut College
New London, Connecticut
July 9-August 19, 1951
Six Weeks Study With: Doris Hum-
phrey, Louis Horst, Jose Limon,
William Bales, Sophie Maslow,
Jane Dudley, Ruth Lloyd, Els
Grelinger, and
MARY WIGMAN - GUEST ARTIST
Co-Directors:
Ruth Bloomer, Martha Hill
Certificate and Academic Credit
Available.
For Details Write To:
Box 28
SCHOOL OF THE DANCE
Connecticut College
New London, Connecticut

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coltection of the coats

ABOVE are just two of our beautiful
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U ~THEY MAY BE full length, ir,,,rty tooo,~e rr cshorties-All

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