100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 23, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-03-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

i

I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCH 23, 1951

Basic Training Conditions Draftee

everyone is aroused out of his
sleep and ordered to "sit up and
look alive."
Even in basic training a man
needs equipment, and by the time
a recruit is in the army for a
reasonable length of time, he is
supposed to have all the supplies
he needs and then some. For some
reason, exception is taken to this
by the Fighting, Frozen Forty-
Fifth.
* * *
MANY OF US were given less
than half our equipment. The big-
gest items which continued to be
missing from the company were
packs, web belts, ponchos and
first aid packets. In fact, these de-

ficiencies seemed to be common to
the entire Fourth Army.
There was nothing so drastic
about the absence of these items
except when we went on a hike
and were expected to bring full
field equipment. Carrying two
blankets and one half a pup
tent with only a rope was not at
all agreeable to my shoulders
after a mile or two.
Supplies in camp were sadly
lacking, too. When we first ar-
rived, we were without footlockers
for almost a month, and were is-
sued only one sheet. National
Guardsmen, however, lived in the
comfort of two sheets and a pil-
low case.

'U' Forestry
Students Get
FourrizesI
Four students in the School of
Natural Resources were honored
yesterday with the presentation of
four annual awards and prizes at
an all-school assembly.
Albert R. Stage, '51NR, was
awarded the Alumni War Memor-
ial Award which is given to the
senior in the School of Natural:
Resources who shows the most
all-around promise. The award,
which carries a monetary grant, is
a memorial to graduates of the
school who died in World War II.
THE WIGHT Memorial Prize
for excellence in wildlife man-
agement was presented to Archi-
bald B. Cowan, Grad., while John
R. Bassett, '51NR, was awarded
the Pack Foundation for the best!
popular essay.C
popular essay on the subject of
forestry.
The D. H. Mathews Award,
which also carries a monetary
grant, was presented to Dean
H. Urie, '51NR, for being judged
the senior in the School of Na-
tural Resources who Chown ex-
cellence in the field of forestry
management.
The awards were presented by
George Banzhaf, president of the
University Forestry Alumni group,
and Bruce Buell, ,vice-president.
Banzhaf is a forestry consultant
in Milwaukee, while Buell is a for-
ester and woodlands manager in
Green Bay.
E. L. Demmon, new director of
the Southeastern Forest Experi-
mental Station, wassthe featured
speaker at the assembly. Dem-
monhas just assumed this job,
having formerly served as director
of the Lake States Forest Experi-
mental Station.

SCHOLASTIC KEYS WON:
Sixteen Athletes Receive Honor Award

Sixteen University athletes yes-
terday received Yost H o n o r
Award keys for 1950-51 at a pre-
sentation dinner in the Union.
Four received the award for the
second straight year., They were
Robert C. Byberg, '51, Thomas R.
Elmblad, Charles A. Murray, '51,
and Ralph A. Straffon, '53M.
Stephen A. Bromberg, '52, Carl
D. Brunsting, '53, Henry E. Bu-
chanan, '52Ed, John H. Hess,
George D. Hickman, '53, and Wil-
liam E. Konrad, '52E were among
those who received the award.
The remaining winners were
James F. Mitchell, '5E, Donald
W. Peterson, '52, Thomas J. Rei-
gel, Jr., '52, Jack W. Rose, '52Ed,
Joseph M. Scandura, '53, and Da-
vid J. Tinkham, '53.
The keys were presented by
Prof. Arthur Boak of the his-
tory department in the absence
of Mrs. Fielding Yost, who was
unable to attend the dinner be-
cause of illness.
The awards were begun in 1940
by the Board of Regents to honor
Yost. They are given annually to
students, who according to the
terms of the award "must be out-
standing in moral character and
good fellowship, scholastic ability,
intellectual capacity and achieve-
ment, physical ability and vigor,
and must show real capacity and
promise of leadership and suc-
cess."
Awarding of the keys is in the
hands of the Yost Honor Award
Committee. This year the com-
mittee was made up of Prof. Boak,
Prof. Rodkey, Registrar Ira Smith.
Supervisor Ernest B. McCoy, of
the department of physical educa-
tion, and Dean of Students Erich
A. Walter, who acted as chairman.

r

;,

ATHLETE HONORED-Ralph Straffon smiles as he receives a
Yost Honor Award key from Prof. Arthur Boak. Straffon was
one of 16 University athletes similarly honored yesterday in a
dinner at the Union. The awards, named in honor of "Point-a-
Minute" Fielding Yost, have been given annually since 1940, with
the exception of the war years.

t

BEARDED LADIES: Three Michigan coeds' scrutinize their ap-
pearance after "growing" beards in a stage make-up class. They
are Carole Eiserman, '52; Louise Miller, '51 and Dorothy Feinberg,
'51.

ACTOR LIVES ROLE:
Easter Narrative Inspires
AnnualReligiousProject

the spectator OPERA
TEN DIFFERENT
COLORS AND MATERIALS

4

Women Flaunt Convention
In Demonstration of Make-up

Convention completely disre-
garded, several coeds were seen
yesterday flaunting virile beards
onecampus.
They had a ready alibi; how-
ever, as the beards were home-
work for a class in Elements of
Make-up, taught by Prof. Wil-
liam P. Halstead of the speech
department.
Ss s
THE BEARDS were fashioned
of crepe hair. Before they were
ready to wear, they underwent
U' Granted
Brittanica Aid
The University has been chosen
among 26 universities throughout
the United States to award the
sixth annual Encyclopaedia Bri-
tannica Films Summer Scholar-
ships in 1951, Ford L. Lemler, di-
rector of the University Audio-
V i s u a 1 Education Center an-
nounced.
Two scholars will be selected by
the University to study this sum-
mer on the EBF semester fee
grants. Applicants must be in-
terested in using audio-visual ma-
terials in the field of education,
and should apply to Lemler be-
fore April 15.
Audio-Visual instruction f o r
those appointed will be given by
the 26 universities chosen, Floyde
E. Brooker, chairman of the EBF
Scholarship Board explained.

several processes, including wet-!
ting, stretching, ironing a n d1
combing.
Spirit gum was applied to the
face before the hair was added,
a few strands being put on at a
time.
For a few hours each week,'
members of the class lose their
identity while they practice dif-
ferent phases of stage make-up.
PREVIOUS OBJECTS have in-
cluded make-up to give the face
appearances of both fullness and
thinness. Next, the class will work'
on nose additions and facial ex-
pressions, with the help of well-
placed putty.
All members of the class serve
on the make-up crew for at least
one of the speech department pro-
ductions.
Prof. Halstead, who is in charge
of make-up for the speech de-
partment, is quite an authority on
the subject, having written several
articles about make-up.
Lane To Hold
Peace Meeting
Panel discussions and meetings
will highlight a peace conference
t 10 a.m. tomorrow at Lane Hall.
Sponsored by the Bane Hall So-
cial Action Committee, the con-
ference will consider three main
topics: the general world situa-
tion; what the citizen can do, and
specific action a campus peace
organization can perform.
The world situation discussion
will include such topics as the
German question, the armament
problem and militarization.
Committee member Art Buck-
binder, '51, stated that the con-
ference hopes to "tap the possibil-
ities of creating a permanent
peace group on campus."
The conference will be open to
the general public.
Desert on Display
"Desert Life Past and Present"
will be the this week's topic of the
University Museums Friday Eve-
ning Programs from 7 to 9 p.m.
today in the Exhibition Halls.
Three accompanying films will
be shown at 7:30 p.m. in the Kel-
logg Auditorium.
1.

By DONNA HENDLEMAN {
Originally conceived as an
unique approach to a Holy Week i
prayer service, "The Story of thez
Lamb" has lead Dabney Mont-1
gomery, Wesleyan Guild member,
to undertake annually a major re-
ligious project.t
For Montgomery, who is thel
Hillel Group
Will Present
'OedipusRex'
"Oedipus Rex," by Sophocles,,
will be presented at 8:30 p.m. to-
day in the Lane Hall Auditorium
by the Hillel Play Reading Group.
Sophocles' work is the first in
a series of plays with religious or
moral meanings to be presented
by the group, according to founder
Philip Pinkus, Grad. "One thing
we want made clear," Pinkus de-
clared, "is that we are.not acting
out these plays. They will be read
in a presentational manner."
* * *
ROSLYN MENDELL, Grad., has
directed the play. In the main
parts willbe WillBooth, Grad., as
Oedipus; Lois Abrams, '52SM, as
Jocasta; Dennis Wepman, '54, as
Creon; and Milton Levin as Teire-
sias.
The chanting of its part by
the chorus will be a special fea-
ture of this presentation. "We
tried it as an experimentand it
worked out so well we decided
to do it that way," Pinkus said.
"This is really a partial return
to the way the choric parts were
originally presented," he ex-
plained. "In the Greek theatre
the chorus performed extremely
stately dance steps as they chant-
ed their parts."
Eiht Survive in
Case Club Trials
Eight junior law students ad-
vanced to the semi-final round of
the Henry M. Cabell case club
competition.
The contestants and their clubs
are: Jerome R. Sanford and Har-
old S. Lentz, Fletcher Club; Rich-
ard G. Patrick and Arthur L. Big-
gins, Woodward Club; Robert A.
Dean and Thomas D. Allen, Day
Club; and Francis J. Pruss and
James Huston, Cooley Club.

originator, producer a n d sole
speaking actor in the Easter nar-
rative play, initially gave it two
years ago at a prayer meeting at
Livingston College in Alabama.
THE CONGREGATION'S reac-
tion to the play, which will be
produced at 7:30 p.m. today in
Pattengill Auditorium, was so good
that Montgomery was asked to re-
peat it at a church a few days
later.
Since that time he has put on
the performance three times, on
each occasion presenting it for
the benefit of some needy or-
ganization.
The performance today is spon-
sored by -the Wesleyan Guild to
raise money for the Guild's Dis-
placed Persons fund.
A MAN who believes in living
his role, Montgomery has estab-
lished the practice of living by
the seven last words of Christ dur-
ing the period he practices for his
performances.
To follow his creed, he limits
himself to one glass of water
for a ten day period before a
showing, wears a Biblical look-
ing wig and gives away the pay
check he receives duringHoly
Week to some needy charity.
In addition, he is fasting today
in preparation for his enactment
of the holy story.
Montgomery takes on six roles
during the course of the play,
playing a shepherd, Judas, his
mother, Peter, Macy Magdalene,
and the mother of Jesus.
Tickets for the performance are
60 cents and can be purchased at
the Pattengill box office before
the show.

..~~~. ,i:u:::tikvI~.7.".G4£h n..r.n..:w:.

A\

I

a a;;
0-It
C

o\

95

IV--

I

}:
'. : 3
",,a r
:j. .. .,. ..
' i'
"3
- i :
:r
.
'$........ :................. 7..

*

0
0
0
0

NAVY CALF
NAVY SUEDE
BLACK SUEDE
BLACK CALF
BROWN CALF

" BROWN SUEDE
" GREEN CALF
" RED CALF
" GREY SUEDE
* NATURAL COWHIDE

C

SIZES 4 to 10 - AAAA to B widths
i&t an aa[L

.

fz

306 SOUTH STATE

I

I

SERVING YOU
THE KEY
TO TOP VALUES
ANT
Unlock the door to
opportunity! Do your
buying and selling
.through want ads for m
vnClIte-.,snnc nro.

,
,

-4nnouncincjJ

I II A "A ( Th AIP i T111 T A AND" Ili

1111 1

iII

11111

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan