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March 18, 1951 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-03-18

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

1 rAGS

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Hamster in Dean's Role
Cops Collegiate . Spotlight

FOR STUDENT RELIEF:
WSSF Will Launch Drive Tomorrow

TV To Show

Film Forum To Be Held

1 "P

PI 1 CPC

* .* *

A preview of the forthcoming
Union Opera, "Go West-Mad-

The first in a series of film for-
ums on "Social Implications of
the Arts" will be held at 8:30 p.m.
today in the League.

By WENDY OWEN
A hamster named Cedric topped
the news in Minnesota while other
colleges worried about atom bomb
attacks and the ever-present sen-
ior headache of how to get a job.
The little rodent, who was
named Cedric Adams, the news-
paper columnist, stepped into the
limelight when he won a hard-
fought election battle for the title,
"Dean for the Day" at the Uni-
versity of Minnesota.
He replaced 'Dean William
Buchta, who commented that it
was cruelty to animals to force
Cedric to wrestle with the prob-
lem of the budget. Cedric's clos-
est competitor for the big job was
Campus
Calendar
PUBLIC HEALTH LECTURE-
Prof. Haven Emerson, of Columbia
University, will speak on "Alco-
holism as a Public Health Prob-
lem" at 4 p.m. tomorrow in Public
Health School Auditorium.;
* * *
BOTANY LECTURE - Prof.
Marcus Rhoades, of the University
of Illinois, will speak on "Abnor-
mal Segregation in Maize" at 4:15
p.m. tomorrow in Kellogg Audi-
torium.
FUEL CONFERENCE -Repre-
sentatives of utility, industrial,
research and educational organi-
zations will attend a conference
on "Combustion of Industrial
Fuel":here Wednesday and Thurs-
day.,

Marijo Loomis, who trailed by'
only 60 votes. She w s on hand
to install Cedric on the Dean's
desk the morning after the ballots
were tabulated.
"I don't mind losing to anyone
so obviously well qualified," she
declared.
STUDENTS in Seattle partici-
pated in an air-raid drill designed
to prepare them for future atom
bomb attacks. Military leaders
assured the worried students that
the possibilities qf an attack were
slim but emphasized that it would
be very risky not to be prepared.
THE JOB-PLACEMENT bureau
at Long Island University issued
a pamphlet warning graduating
seniors not to rely on "who you
know" in getting a job.
Other things to be avoided are
"I don't really have' the qualifi-
cations but I know I can learn"
and "of course I don't expect to
stay long in this small town."
On the positive side, the stu-
dents were'told to show considera-
tion for everything fr9m the boss's
desk to fellow workers and to at-
tempt always to exercise their
judgment in a way to assure their
success.
MIT Chenitist Will
Speak Tomorrow
Stuart Fenton, of the Massa-
chusetts Institute of Technology,;
will speak on "Synthesis of Some
Substituted Cyclic Polyolefins" at
4:15 p.m. tomorrow in Rm. 1300
Chemistry Building.

BLOOD DONORS-Pris Ball, '51, Student Legislature cabinet
member, donates blood at the University Hospital blood bank for
the WSSF drive while S President George Roumell, '51 (right),
and John Gyr, Grad., WSSF worker, wait their turns to contri-
bute.

World Student Service Fund
workers will begin collecting mon-
ey and pledges tomorrow as the
international relief organization
begins its annual week-long fund
drive.
Contributions will be taken in
at booths on campus and by soli-
citors who will be stationed in ev-
ery dormitory and house group.
* * *uegru.
IN ADDITION, WSSF has re-
quested students who cannot give
money to sell their blood at the
University Hospital blood bank
and turn the proceeds over to the
drive. The blood bank pays $15
for every pint of blood.
Money collected by WSSF
goes to provide food, clothing,
shelter, books, medical care and
supplies for dependent students
in countries torn by war or
natural calamities.
Students in Asiatic ountries,
especially India, are most in need
this year, according to WSSF re-
ports, with Greece, Yugoslavia
and Germany the European areas
still blighted by widespread need.
ENTIRELY financed by volun-
tary contributions, WSSF has
carried on its relief work since
1937, when it was first organized
to aid students of devastated uni-
versities in China. Its activities
were extended to Europe in'1939.
Through its efforts, ruined
libraries have been restored,
tubercular students have been
taken for treatment and nursed
back to health and men and
women lacking the necessities
of life have been provided with
them so they could pursue their
studies.
With the initial push provided
by WSSF funds and, machinery,
students abroad have instigated
and carried on self-help programs.
Such a program is the mimeo-
graph cooperatives in universi-
ties throughout Europe and Asia.
These co-ops reproduce textbooks
destroyed by war. Also operating
are student laundries, restaurants
and banks.
No campus goal has been set
for the drive, but WSSF publicity
chairman Herb Cheston, '51, ex-
pressed hope that everyone would
contribute.
"WSSF is the only organization
which concentrates on aiding uni-
versity students-the people who
will be tomorrow's leaders," he
said.
Buy and Sell
T hru Daily Classifieds

i

am," will be featured on the Uni- Sponsored by the campus Coun-
versity's Television Hour at 1 p.m. cil of the Arts, Sciences and Pro-
today over WWJ-TV. fessions, today's panel will fea-
Fifteen members of the cast and ture the screening, of "Boundary
New York director William Hol- Lines," a unique cinematic docu-
brook will be interviewed on the ment, animated with paintings
Teletour part of. the program. ' and modern music and dealing
Research assistants in the Cen- with the developments of group
ter for Japanese Studies will dis- hatreds which supposedly lead to
cuss "Korea-Past and Present." war.
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Crispy Spring
COTTONS
See our ahead-of-Spring colie.-
tion of exciting frocks, that hit
the fashion jack-pot in tyl.
and value!

Following the film, a four-man
panel, headed by Prof. Howard
McClusky, of t h e education
school, will discusd the forum to-
pic.
Others on the panel are Saul
Maloff, of the English department;
John Blue, Grad, former Howard
University instructor; and Jules
Yanover, Grad, formerly of the
Detroit Symphony Orchestra.
Today's forum Is open to thei
public.

LOOK and LISTEN
..with Harry Reed

Criticism of the classroom re-ostudent, Robin Glover, '53, voiced

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cording of Prof. Preston Slosson's
History 92 and Prof. Marvin Fel-
heim's English 60 lectures has
been voiced by students who think
the lectures aren't as good as they
formerly were.
The recordings are used by Uni-
versity FM station WUOM in its
daily program "From the Class-
room," which airs the history
course at 1 p.nm., Monday, Wednes-
day and Friday and the English
course Tuesday and Thursday at
the same time.
The broadcasts, part of the sta-
tion's adult education program,
began in the fall of 1949, and have
presented several political science
and history courses to date.
* * *
ONE ENGLISH 60 Shakespeare
Anthropology
GroupTo Meet
A three-day session of the
American Association of Physical
Anthropologists will open at 9:30
a.m. tomorrow In Rackham Audi-
torium.
Registration will begin then and
will be followed by the first read-
ings of scientific papers.
Among the papers will be "Ana-
tomical Relationship Predisposing
to Lumbosacral Fusion," by Fred-
erick Thieme, of the anthropology
department, and "Preliminary Ob-
servations -on Human Skeletal
Remains from Conkling Cavern,
New Mexico" by T. D. Stewart, of
the U. S. National Museum.
Also on the list is a paper by
S. L. Washburn, of the University
of Chicago, on "Analysis of Ana-
tomical Difference."

the opinion that the contact be-
tween professor and student isn't
as warm as it formerly was. "It's
clear to me that he's talking to
people who aren't there and he
takes up the obvious more than
he used to. I miss the informal-
ity."
Speaking with the authority
of someone taking both courses
being recorded, Pete Aliferis, '52,
echoed Miss Glover's comment
on the sacrifice of informality.
"Prof. Slosson doesn't seem to
go ofi on tangents anymore.
"The Great Man doesn't pace
because he has to stand near the
mike and this takes a lot from his
lectures.
"As for Prof. Felheim's courses,
there's much in Shakespeare
which must be left out because of
broadcasting laws."
HOWEVER, the faculty mem-
bers concerned have different
opinions on the recordings. Prof.
Slosson, who has wide experience
in radio broadcasting, denied any
difference in his style. "There's
no change at all. I never used
notes before and I don't now. We
still have our question period; I
just don't walk around now."
Prof. Felheim admitted there
are disadvantages as well as ad-
vantages: "The recording leads
to greater organization of my
lectures and more material in
them.
"On the other hand, the tape re-
cording interferes with the inti-
mate relationship of the class.
This is partially because of the
large size of the class, however."
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

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INDIA ART SHOP
350 Maynard Street

Spring Blouses.
THE MEANS TO A VERSATILE WADROBE
Four pert blouses, picked for prettiness and wardrobe appeal ..
each a blossom-fresh skirt and suit topping with a way of being
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