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March 15, 1951 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TEMRSDAY, MARCH 15, "1951

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half moon

Double-woven Nylon
Shortie, Whipsewn

In white. Sizes 6112, 7, and 7 /z

University To S
London, Paris, Rome'
To Be High Points
Of Six Country Tour
By KATHRYN RADOVAN
Travel minded students may find
the answer to their summer vaca-
tion problems in the "University
of Michigan Tour of Europe" fea-
tured by the League Travel Service.
The tour was originally open to
university members only, but stu-
dents' from other big ten schools
may now join in on the trip. Some
Michigan State College students
have already filled applications for
the tour.
* S* 4
S I X COUNTRIES, England,
Germany, Switzerland; Holland,
Italy and France, will be visited.
A reconverted luxury liner, the
S.S. Georgia, will accommodate
the travelers. The ship will leave
the New York harbor on June
28, and return on Sept. 14.
All traveling will be done first
class.
COST FOR the trip is estimated
at $1493. This includes transpor-
tation costs, room rent and service
tips. Meals are also included ex-
cept for lunches and dinners while
in London and Paris.
Highlights of the tour will be
visits to the Hague, London,
Heidelburg, Monte Carlo, Naples,
Pompeii, Florence, Genoa and
the Isle of Capri.
Gondolas will carry the travelers
sightseeing through Venice. A trip
will be made through the Shake-
speare country and the Castle of
Chillon will be viewed. A cham-
pagne factory in Wiesbaden and a
trip on a cog wheel railway will
be included.

THIS SPRING, provide the highlight, the
picture with Hansen Personality Gloves .

" FOR WOMEN -OI LY:
)ponsorEuro can hummer T r
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finishing touch to your fashion
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V

306 South State Street

TO SEE THE WORLD-Nan Holman and Jenny Quirk look over
vacation material at the League Travel Bureau as they visualize
marvelous summer trips.

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Daily Classifieds Bring Quick Results

CATHOLIC STUDENTS will be
given an opportunity to have an
audience with the Pope while in.
Rome. There will be a five day
stop in Paris.
The Travel Service is open
from 3 to 6 p.m. Monday through
Friday and is located in the lob-
by of the League.
Other tours may also be arrang-
ed through the service.

The service, which came into
existence last December, is spon-
sored by the League Council 'and'
operated by student volunteer
workers.
If a man or woman student
signs 25 other persons to take the
tour, he or she may also travel
to Europe with all expenses paid
except for transportation from
home to the point of departure.

Judiciary. .
By ATHENA SAVAS
One of the most important or-
ganizations on campus is the Wo-
men's Judiciary Council.
Comprised of seven upperclass-
men, the council tries all cases of
broken house regulations. An-
other service offered, and consid-
ered just as important by the
members, is the counselling aspect
bf judiciary.
Each Tuesday the entire council
holds office hours in the League
Undergraduate Office. At this
time any woman on campus is in-
vited to come and talk over prob-
lems pertaining to rules or diffi-
culties.
*s s
OFTEN JUDICIARY councils of
resident houses or house presi-
dents come to them for informa-
tion and advice. A member of
the council is on hand every' after-
noon during the rest of the week
to answer questions.
Each member of the council,
excluding the chairman, has a
section of campus where she
works with the resident houses
concerning regulations.
She is helped by one of the six
sophomore aids who check the
sign out sheets.
* * *
ACTUAL CASES of broken rules
are tried by the judiciary group
Thursdays from 3 to 5 p.m. Types
of cases tried include extreme
lateness or an accumulation ofj
five latenesses a semester, or seven
in one year.
Other major offenses are the
misuse of late or overnight per-
mission, drinking in house resi-
dences and excessive drinking.
Minor cases involve those re-
ferred to the council by house
mothers or house judiciary coun-
cils.
IN SOME INSTANCES, the
council works with the Dean of
Women's office. The number 'of
cases handled varies from one
or two a week to many more at
other times.
Penalties imposed by the
council may consist of social
probation for one night to sev-
eral weeks. The penalty is var-
led to fit the offense.
Present members of the board
are chairman, Barbara Little; sec-
retary, Mary Martin; Donna Bill-
ington, Rhoda Michberger, Mar-
garet Blackford, Connie Neuman,
and Ann Waterman.
WAA Offers
Club Activities.
Many Students Enjoy

Interviewing . .
By MAXINE RYCKMAN
Choosing women to fill sopho-
more, :unior and, senior League
positions is a task that rests
squarely on the shoulders of the
interviewing and nominating com-
mittee.
This committee decides on who
shall fill all League positions, ex-
cept those on the executive board
and the interviewing and nomina-
ting committee for the next year.
(In regard to these two exceptions,
the Board of Representatives
chooses one of two candidates
nominated by the interviewing
committee to fill each position.)
THE SELECTIONS of the com-
mittee are subject to the approval
of the League Council.
Interviewing and nominating
activities begin in the fall with
the choosing of women to fill
vacancies in the League.
At the beginning of the second
semester, the committee interviews
for senior positions. Following
this, interviews for junior and then
sophomore positions are held.

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Walker

Moels

IN FASHIONS THAT FLATTER

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T H I S YEAR'S committee is
made up of Patricia Breon, chair-
man; Jeanne Schrieber, secretary;
Marguerite Adams, Margaret Ry-
burn and Nancy Watkins; junior
members and Nancy Baehre, Phyl-
lis Kaufman and Jo Phillips, sen-
ior members.
The committee makes its se-
lections on the basis of petitions
and interviews.
Some of the main points it con-
siders are: The interviewee's know-
ledge of the job she wants and its
problems and her awareness of the
function of the committee on
which she wishes to work within
the League.
S * S
THE COMMITTEE also consid-
ers the interviewee's suggestions
and criticisms and her personal
qualifications for doing the work
required.
The procedure which commit-
tee members recommend that
interviewees f oIo w includes
choosing a desired position (or
as many as the candidate Is in-
terested in), eonsulting t he
League President's Reports in
the League Undergraduate Of-
fice to find out about the job,
turning in petitions before the
deadline and signing up for an
interview.
A member of the League Council
is in the Undergraduate Office
from 3 to 5 p.m. every day before
interviewing. begins to answer
questions that prospective inter-
viewees may have.
INTERVIEWING and nominat
ing committee members also rec-
ommend calling the person who
holds the position being inter-
viewed for, in order to find out
more about the job.
Many Campus
D fances Rich
iIn Tradition
*a
By JANICE JAMES
Foresters favor Paul Bunyan,
. engineers employ a slide rule, law-
yers like the wig and robe, and
every group fully supports the
reign of tradition.
Thus, the campus calendar is
chalked full of dances which help
each group follow their tradition-
al plans.
* * *s

.+.

'4.

Group Participation
By PAT SMITH -
For recreation, one may turn to
the Women's.Athletic Association.
Masculine figures may question
this statement, but it may be be-
cause they do' not realize the
growth and scojpe the organization
-has achieved.
For example, co-recreation clubs
(having a joint membership of
both men and women) have come
into their own.
- * * *
AMONG THESE are the Folk
and Square Dance Club claiming
a large membership which holds
dances every Wednesday night;
the Ice Skating Club whose mem-
bers put on pre-hockey game per-
formances; while the Ballet and
Modern Dance Clubs sponsor a
major dance festival in the
spring.
This year, co-recreational ac-
tivities are branching out. The
WAA is setting up a co-tecrea-
tion board which will be entirely
separate from the WAA Board.
The new board will meet, prob-
ably weekly, to discuss the ac-
tivities and problems related to
the, co-recreation clubs and
programs.
As a big step towards further-
ing the co-recreational program
this year, for the first time, mer
may become managers of co-rec.
reational clubs.
.* * *
THE CHAIRMAN of the nev
board will be the connecting lini
between this board and the WA!i
Board by serving on both.
To supplement the co-recrea-
tional program, members of the
WAA Board have been serving
at the Friday night corecrea-
tional program at the Intramur-
al Building. They have acted
as lifer guards at the pool and
as matrons in the women's lock-
er rooms.
WAA and the Union are cc
sponsoring Tennis Ball Weekeni
which will be held May 18 and 19
This will include a dance unde
the stars (weather permitting) o

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GRETA RUBINSTEIN, New Women's Dorm,
is modeling a gay, flattering dress right in tune
with Spring. Greta is a junior in L.S. and A.
from New York City, majoring in psychology.

4

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EACH YEAR the School of Na-
tural Resources sends an emmis-
sary to the northwoods with the
purpose of inviting that foresters'
favorite, Paul Bunyan, to the an-
nual Paul Bunyan "Formal".
This "informal formal"' is
held in Waterman and Barbour
Gymnasiums, and blue, jeans
and plaid shirts are the re-
quired attire.
Continuing the "formal" theme,
corsages of p i n e cones and
branches are sold at the dance,
together with ciderand doughnuts
which may be purchased at the
"Longest Bar in Ann Arbor."
* * *
NOT TO B OUTDONE, the en-
gineers annually present their
"Slide Rule Ball." It is at this
time, that they display the school's
traditional symbol, a giant slide
rule.
Perhaps it should be stated
that the engineers ATTEMPT to
display the rule, for the law stu-
dents try their best to make the
rule disappear before the dance.
Medical students display their
traditional symbols at "Caduceus
Ball" each year, while the dental
students present "Odonta Ball."
* * *
TOPPING EFFORTS of all the
others, are the law students, who
stage two annual dances, "Wig

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SHIRLEY FORSYTH, Martha Cook, models
this alluring date dress in cotton satin. Shirley
is a junior in L.S. and A. from Grosse Pointe,
Michigan. She is p major in speech.

11

The cotton satin dress Miss Forsyth has on
features a crushed collar framing the shoul-
ders that curves down into a daring V-neck
and double-breasted front, with a full, flairing
skirt. Seen in MADEMOISELLE, Page 147 of
the arch isue.15.95.

Miss Rubinstein is wearing a smartly styled
dress with a cotton satin top that gracefully
flows into a wide sweeping handblocked chintz
skirt. The dress is neatly trimmed with an
adjustable Johnny collar and buttons down
the front. 14.95.

5'

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