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March 13, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-03-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

3SIX/

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 13, 1951

mu________________________________________________________________

MINTED PLUMAGE:
Bird Paintings Featured
At Rackham Art Exhibit

" i

By AUDREY MURPHY
Bird lovers can observe their
favorites on canvas as well as on
the wing this week.
This still life bird watching is
taking place at the Rackham Gal-
leries, where an exhibit of Arctic
and United States birds is on dis-
play.
FEATURE ATTRACTION of
the : exhibit is the work of Prof.
George M. Sutton of the zoology
department, who is noted for his
outstanding bird paintings.
A series of Arctic paintings,
it is one of few ever made di-
rectly on the spot in the North-
ern regions.
"Because of the arctic climate,
I was forced to paint the birds
from the interior of a Hudson Bay
trading post," he revealed.
* *.*
"THE EXACT lighting effect is
essential when painting birds," re-
marked Prof. Sutton. "Two or
three days are required to make
one painting and- somtetimes it is
necessary to continue the work
for two or thee weeks, in order to
have identical lighting each time."
"I like to sketch the bird as
it flies through the slky before
making the actual painting," he
continued.
When this is done Prof. Sutton
usually captures his models by the
use of nets, occasionally employ-
ing a trap for the purpose. He ac-
tually holds the specimens in his
hand while painting them. (
PROF. SUTTON, who has been
painting since the age of nine, is
Strmg Quartet
To Play Today
The University's Stanley Quar-
tet will present the first of its two
concerts dedicated to the music'
of Franz Schubert at 8:30 p.m.-
today in Rackham Lecture Hall.
The quartet is composed of
School of Music faculty members:
Prof. Oliver Edel, cellist; Paul
Doktor, violist; and Prof. Gilbert
Ross and Emil Rabb, violinists.
Tonight's program will include
"Quartet in G major, Op. 161,"
and the "Quintet in C major, Op.
163." In the latter work, which was
written for two violins, viola and
two cellos the Quartet will be ac-
companied by cellist Jerome Jeli-
nek, '51 SNP.

the author of several books and
has also made illustrations for
others.
He is currently making illustra-
tions for the book, "The Guide
to Bird Finding." Many of the
artist's works are now on display
in museums of the United States.
His paintings and others int the
exhibit will continue to be dis-
played through tomorrow in the
Rackham Galleries.-
'Britain Today'
T o Be -Subject
Of Bryan Talk
Julien Bryan, cameraman and
lecturer, will speak on "England
in a Changing World," at 8:30
p.m. Thursday in Hill Auditorium.
The lecture, the last in the 1950
-51 series of the University Ora-
torical Association, will feature a
film which Bryan photographed
in Britain. Not a travelogue, the
film is built around the.lives of
six English and Scottish families.
Varying classes of English so-
ciety are represented in the peo-
ple depicted. There are sections
on the lives of an Oxford student,
a farming family, a London ballet
dancer and a Scottish miner.
Bryan in thirty years of experi-
ence has made documentary films
about countries all over the world
such as China, Germany, and all
the South American countries.
The lecturer has made ninentrips
to Russia, the first in 1930, the
last in 1947, and out of these
trips have come some -of his best
known films.
The Hill Auditorium box office
will be open from 10 a.m. to -1
p.m. and from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m.
today and tomorrow. On Thurs-
day it will be open from 10
a.m. to 1 p.m. and from 2 p.m. to
lecture time at 8:30 p.m.
Tickets are priced at $1.50, $1.20
and 60 cents.
'Technic' Sales
Peacetime uses of atomic pow-
er are discussed in the latest
Technic, on sale today at the En-
gineering Arch.
The erngineering magazine also
reveals a new "car of the future."
Industrious readers who solve
the "Technic Teaser" word prob-
lems and brain twisters will re-
ceive free subscriptions.

Expert Says
Groups Peril
National Life
"The state is in danger of los-
ing control of national life be-
cause of the increasing strength
of special interests," Prof. Mar-
shall Knappen of the political sci-
ence department, declared last
night.
Speaking before, an Economic
club meeting, Prof. Knappen ex-
plained that in the late 1920's and
1930's the state acted as a police-
man to put down the special in-
terests which rose against the
national welfare.
"Now, that agency which was
supposed to police the special in-
terests is being controlled by those
very interests," he said.
* * *
PROF. KNAPPEN pointed out
that the weakness is the state re-
sulting from this special interest
control is particularly apparent in
the field of foreign affairs.
"The Communist order is out-
mobilizing the west in ap-
preaching its maximum power
potential with the resources at
its command," he declared.
"Special interests have hamper-
ed our program of aid to Eu-
rope."
The professor listed the ship-
ping interest, and the insurance
business as being among the
groups whose demands for con-
sideration of their private inter-
ests prevented the United States
from getting maximum power to
Europe in the aid program.
* * *
"THE LIBERAL states are forc-
ed to yield to the interest -groups
in such matters as the tariff, Prof.
Knappen commented, even though
the reduced tariff. might have a
desirable effect on the national
welfare."
, Prof. Knappen suggested that
the solution to this situation may
be to form public interest pres-
sure groups to compete with the
special interest groups.

Jascha Heifetz, rniaster of the
violin, will present the ninth con-
cert in the Choral Union Series at
8:30 p.m. tomorrow at Hill Audi-
torium.
Scheduled on the program are:
"Chaconne" by Vitalli, Beethoven's
"Kreutzer Sonata," "Sonata" by
Debussy, "Nocturne" by Chopin,
"Capriccio-Valse" by Wieniawski
and "Caprice No. 24" by Paganini-
Auer.
* * *
HEIFETZ, WHO WAS one of
the most famous child prodigies
of the century, took his first les-

MASTER VIOLINIST:
Jascha Heifetz To Perform
In Ninth Choral Union Concert

Q

sons at the age of three and made
his public debut at the age of sev-
en.
Since that time the Russian-
born violinist has performed in
concert halls, throughout the
world. He made his American
debut in 1917.
* * *
AN EARLY advocate of the mo-
tion picture as a medium of bring-
ing concert music to the movie
public, Heifetz has appeared in
several movies, "Ragged Angels,"
"They Shall Have Music" and
"Carnegie Hall."

- MagicFlute'
Tonight's performance of "The
Magic Flute," the last of the run.
has been sold out.
Officials said that no further
performances of the Mozart opera
are planned.
f ~ Shl He's a bushnes MCW.
relaxing his way'to the
next sates coll.
C Greyhound trave is
nice and neighborly.
She's bound for
sunny acati
~ .t.lands.
A college rao
dollars ahem
-going home.
This is one a'
the world's best
drvers.i
! Next trip, go Greyhound? See
how pleasant, relaxed and en-
joyable highway travel can be,
once you're free of the responsi-
bility of driving! you'll ride at
ease in deep-cushioned seats..
on direct scenic routes . . . at
the lowest cost in travel.
For frequent schedules and
thrifty fares to the destination
of your choice, call your friendly
Greyhound agent.
GREYHOUND TERMINAL
116 West Huron
- Phone 2-5511

'I

1,
a

-Daily--Jack Bergstrom
BLACKOUT SCENES-Stan Gould '51, who just came over to
borrow an accounting book, is faced by four Barbour ghosts,Sue
Shafter '54, Babs Cohen '52, Ann Plumton '54 and Betsy Smith
'54, as he enters the blacked-out dormitory.
* * * *
Power Failure Dims Evening
Activity in Newberry-Barbour

Student Coop
University of California at Los Angeles
Los Angeles, California
"- '

For twelve hours Sunday, dark-
ness descended on the Newberry-
Barbour residences.
A power blackout due to the
University transferring service
lines from Angell Hall to the new
construction unit disturbed the
underground working of the elec-
tric system and caused the resi-
dents to live in moley blackness.
* * *
THE DEFECT was present from
8:15 a.m. to 8:45 p.m., but the
full effects of the lack of lighting
did not become evident until sun-
down.
Then, the lounges and rooms
were thrown into pitchy black-
ness, and recourse was made to
a more primitive form of light-
ing, candles.
The gloom and flickering sha-
dows prompted four denizens in
Barbour to don sheets, and pro-
vide ghostly escorts for men ar-
riving to pick up their dates.
After guiding the men in eerie,
candle-lit silence to the main of-
fice they left them huddled in the
blackness while phone calls were
put through to the central New-
berry switchboard and then trans-
ferred to Barbour informing the
residents that they had callers.

THE FRONT lounges provided
the great attraction of the eve-
ning. Early in the evening
there was no illumination at all,
but later a six-candle candelabra
was placed on the piano. Because
of this bright light, most couples
went straight through the lounge
to the unlighted sunporch. Ac-
cording to one unusual young man,
the only. handy thing about the
lighting situation was that he
didn't need any matches.
The casual informality of the
scene was disrupted once by the
entrance of one coed's parents.
They expressed dismay over the
hardships their daughter had to
contend with in order to get an
education.
Lovell To Speak
Prof. Alfred Lovell, of the en-
gineering college, will address Sig-
ma Rho Tau, engineering speech
society, at 7 p.m. today in Rm.
2080 E. Engineering Building.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

'Hotel
ToBe

Universe'
Performed

In Los Angeles, California, a favor.
ite gathering spot of students at the
University of California at Lqs
Angeles is the Student Co-op be.
cause it is a cheerful place-full of
friendly university atmosphere.
And when the gang gathers around,
ice-cold Coca-Cola gets the call. For
here, as in college haunts every-
where-Coke belongs.

"Hotel Universe" by Philip Bar-
rie, the second play presented by
the Arts Theatre Club, will open
a two-week run at 8 p.m. today
in ithe club's theatre at 209/2 E.
Washington.
Summer Courses
University of MadridI
Study and Travel

Je

Ask for it either way ... both
trade-marks mean the same thing..
BOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY
Ann Arbor Coca-Cola Bottling Company
© 1951, The Coca-Cola Company

Religion in Life Week

I

UNITARIAN EVENTS
March 13th, 14th, and 15th
Seminars at Michigan Union-4:15 P.M.
Dr. Duncan Littlefoir, Minister of Fountain Street Church
Grand Rapids, Mchigan
Theme: "The World Religions and Communism."
SPECIAL SERVICE OF WORSHIP - WED., MARCH 14-8:15 P.M.
ot First Unitarian Church, 1917 Washtenaw
DR. DUNCAN LITTLEFAIR, preaching on:
"THE FUTILITY OF ACHIEVEMENT"
--A Billings Fund Lectureship
Special Organ Music by Miss Harriet Frye

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12c each additional pound
All your clothing laundered,
FLUFF DRIED and NEATLY FOLDED
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for finishing these articles
SHIRTS, additional........ ....17c
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HANDKERCHIEFS........... 3c
SOXpr.:............... . ... 3c

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JULIEN

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COLOR MOVIES

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