100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

March 11, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-03-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


4

sI

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAt, MARCH 11, 19

I ___________________________ m

. Grismore,
Professor
f Law, Dies
Prof. Grover G. Grismore, 62
ears old, member of the Law
chool faculty since 1914, died
arly yesterday at his Detroit
ome.
Prof. Grismore, ill since last Oc-i
Iber, was a prominent educator
i the field of contract law. His
rst-year contracts course was
ae of the fundamental courses in
he Law School.
Besides his teaching duties,
rof. Grismore was secretary-,
easurer of the board of direc-
>rs of the Lawyer's Club, chair-
an of the University committee
n discipline until his retirement
st June and a member of several
onorary professional societies.
Prof. Grismore was born Oct.
7, 1888, at Pandora, 0. He enter-
the University in 1910, receiv-
zg his BA degree two years later.
aining his law degree in 1914 he
dned the Law School faculty as
n instructor the same year. In
917 he was made an assistant
rofessor.
After serving in the ar-
vy in the First World War he re-
irned to the University and a
ear later he was promoted to a
all professorship.
Prof. Grismore is survived by
is wife, the former May Aleen
Vhite, and his son, Roger Gris-
ore, of Ann Arbor. Private fun-
ral services will be held at 1 p.-
i. tomorrow at the Muehlig Cha-

Student Turns 21
Just Before Midnight ... Two Minutes Later

Campus COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Illinois Stu
Calendar Ugliest Mai
Events Tody __
ROBERT NOEHREN, University B vC SAMBA
Organist, will play a series of An "Ugly Man on Campus" con-
three Sunday recitals beginning test at te University of Illinois
at 4:15 p.m. in Hill Auditorium. got amus natoa atte
Ava Chase and Mary Fish- week, but collegiate life was mar-
burne, of the music school, wilt red by several tragedies.
give a piano recital at 8:30 pTm.l
in Hill Auditorium, STUDENTS at Illinois ambled
* * to the polls Thursday to choose
THE UNIVERSITY'S Television the "Ugly Man of 1951." Prior to
Hour will run 30 minutes longer the election a heated campaign
than usual at 1 p.m. when special was lpunched by campus frater-
selections from "Magic Flute" nities in support of their candi-
will be telecast from Lydia Men- dates. The Daily Illini carried
delssohn theatre. some of the qualifications.
* * *A leading candidate was des-
Coming Events cribed as: "Fat Face:" harelip,,
TCKETmiFn Eh ts buck teeth, bloodshot eyes, hates
TICK(ETS FOR the last two coeds, they hate him, has a
performances of "Magic Flute" blemish between his ears-his
tomorrow and Tuesday nights will face; mean, dumb, in other
be sold starting at 10 am. to- words-a& slob!
morrow in the box office of Lydia He didn't win.
Mendelssohn. 4,* *
** * *
Prof. Marshall Knappen, of the BUT MUCH of the week's col-
political science department, lege news was unfortunate. At the
will speak on "Economic Inter- University of Texas the third stu-
ests, Pressure Groups and For- dent in a year plunged to his
eign Policy" at 7:45 p.m. to-
morrow in Rackham Amphi-
theatre.
- - *
ORIGINAL water color paint-
ings used in the Ford Times will
be on display tomorrow through
Mar. 24 in the architecture college.
"2 a +w
PROF. ALFRED LOVELL, of
the engineering college, will ad-
dress Sigma Rho Tau, engineer-
ing speech society, at 7 p.m. Tues-
day in Rm. 2080 East Engineering -
Building.
* * *
DR. HALBERT DUNN, of the
National Office of Vital Statistics,
will address a public health as-
sembly at 4 p.m. tomorrow in the
Public Health Auditorium.

r

StanleyQuart
;dents Choose.
The first of two concerts devoted
to the works of Franz Schubert
,n on2 Clami us owill be presented by the Stanley
Quartet at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday in

et To Play
for two violins, viola and two cel-
los.
The G major Quartet was com-
posed in 1826 and the Quintet in
1838, the year of Schubert's death.
Both works are generally recog-
nized as representative of the com-
posers most mature period.

s
t

death from the upper stories of
the university's tower.
A series ofthree notes was
found near the window from
which the student had Jumped:
"I am going to Jump. Good idea.
I didn't slip. I wasn't pushed. I
Jumpedi"
Local police Were still uncertain
of his motive.
AND AT the University of Wi-
consin, a 20-foot, 100-pound
branch from a giant elm dropped
50 feet and bounced off the head
of an economics student.
The student was knocked un-
conscious but apparently the
blow didn't harm him. Later he
reported a "slight headache."
A University of Connecticut rid-
ng instructor, Adelaide Connolly,
also received an abrupt blow.
While grooming a two-year-old
colt, Miss Connolly was kicked in
the face by the colt's two hind
feet, sustaining a head fracture.

Rackham Lecture Hall.
Included on the program will be
'"Quartet in G major, Op. 161"
and "Quintet in C major, Op. 163"

-Daily-Roger Reinkea
IN THERE PITCHERING--With a slosh and a gulp Bill Robinson,.
'53, becomes a man In a local tavern late last night and early
this morning.
CARRIAGES TO CABS:
Radio Replaces Reins
As Taxis Come of Age

e

The Rev.
the First
Detroit,
11 follow9

Dr. William
Presbyteriant
will officiate.
in Forest Hill

Lemon,
Church
Burial
Ceme-

ged Mag Slated
or SellingBlock
The oldest engineering college
gazine in America is up for
[e.
Copies of the Technic may be
rchased tomorrow and Tuesday
the Engineering Arch.

It's been a long haul for the cab
industry from horse-drawn car-
riages to modern radio-dispatched
cabs but the effort has been
worthwhile.
Edna Rhead, a "dispatcheress"
for a local cab association, voiced
this opinion between numerous
telephone calls and radio mes-
sages. She is one of the three dis-
patchers working an eight-hour
shift whose. job is to.act as go-
betweens for five telephone lines
and 24 radio-equipped cabs.
** *
THE DISPATCHERS keep track
of each cab at seven cab stands
throughout the city. When the call
for a cab comes in the dispatcher
sends a driver from the nearest
stand and checks off his number.

IMPORTED FROM PERSIA
Mother of Pearl
miniature hand painted jewelry"
INDIA ART SHOP
330 Maynard Street
very new, for you, for Spring!
all-occasion suits by

The drivers report to the dis-
patcher when they arrive at a
stand.
The radios used by the cab
association transmit on an ul-
tra-high frequency which can
be heard for about 15 miles.
They seldom have trouble with
amateurs trying to break in on
the frequency and foul up the
dispatching system but sometimes
in the southeast section of the
city the Ypsilanti radio cab sig-
nals reach Ann Arbor cabs.
* * *
"THE TOP qualifications for a
cab dispatcher are experience and
r tact. Many times I'm able to
catch only a part of the report
from the cab and have to guess
the rest," Miss Rhead explained.
"After a bit of experience a
dispatcher can learn the sound
of each driver's voice so if sev-
eral drivers radio in at once
they can be called back later to
get the full message," she con-
tinued.
"The dispatcher must be as fair
as possible in giving jobs to the
cabs. The drivers all pay for the
radio service and it is unfair to
show favortism."
"However," Miss Rhead declar-
ed, "we do at times consider the
driver and the job. For example
if a driver is having trouble with
his back we don't usually send
him on a run that may involve
lifting heavy trunks or bags."
"I've been in the cab business
for eight years," she reported.
"When radio dispatching was first
used in Ann Arbor three years ago
I shifted to that end of the busi-
ness. However, I still drive a cab
once in a while to stay in prac-
tice and better understand the
drivers' problems."

le

-,*"Wobw
114%7,k l

.

Dual-collared slimster
with nicely rounded
hips . . . pockets placed
adroitly to give the
littlest waist of all!
In fine worsted sheen.
Sizes 7 to 15.
Advertised in
Seventeen
Pretty curves, pretty
colors . . . pretty
wonderful, these suits
for the soft-air days of
Spring! So RIGHT,
you'll wear them
constantly!
JAUNTY JUNIOR
PRICES
1%095 .,,, ...-

Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

What's up
In the Dorms
(Any items of Interest cncering
any dormitory, cooperative or league
house may be submitted to Judy
Lager at the Daily, 2-3241, or at
3-0715.)
Invitations have been extended
to leaders in education and reli-
gion to speak to dormitory resi-
dents in connection with the Re-
ligion-In-Life-Week Conference.
* *0 *
HELEN NEWBERRY HALL will
entertain the Rev. Francis Mc-
Peek, Industrial Relations secre-
tary for the Council of Social Ac-
tion of the Congregational Chris-
tian Churches, tomorrow at a din-
ner in his honor.
ALSO SCHEDULED are talks by
the Rev. NDuncan Littlefair, of
Grand Rapids, to the residents of
Nelson International House, to-
morrow and Martha Cook Thurs-
day.
* « rt
THE REV. JOHN BURT, of
Youngstown, O., is slated to speak
at Betsy Barbour Thursday and
the Michigan State faculty will
be represented by Prof. David
Dickson, who will speak to the men
of Michigan House.
* * 0
PROF. SEYMOUR SMiTH, of
Yale University,' will speak to
the men of Anderson and Tyler
houses Wednesday and Thursday
respectively.
t Underarm Pads
54. r
lorant pad that realy copes
ssive underarm perspiration I

}:
ice.
fS:3
k".

j/, i
...."
/
/ 1

t ANN OWEN~SQ.
DON'T BE LIKE THAT
LIKE WHAT?
LIKE EVERYBODY ELSE. c
Every skirt-every blouse-every dress we have (
is different. You won't see a copy of yourself
in Ann Arbor, or Chicago, or New York and
you'll look beautiful any place.
Skrts from $7 to $25.
t 500 E. LIerty St. Phone 34781
st~c~ooe oe.. oe~oo
*U
?hioii's falten head-over-hesls
forthe new glanc-inviting
stockings with
sold color he.ts
and matching earns
byS L
black heels! nay heels!
_ Y.
50
a~
Ohl what an olivfing contrast...legs veile'
in fabulously filmy SAPPHIRE nylons spiked with
solidly dark heels and seams Provocative pointers
to rising hemlines .. prettifiers to slim ankles
Maspe, illusive smoky.gry with
!solid black heelsoand seams
Srny blu, bare-cast gunmetal with
solid navy heels and seams
HOSIERY- FIRST FLOOR
COLLEGE SHOP

4

We recommend Bijos
wylone because they are
so exquisitely propor-
tinned to your own
ntuaral contours in your
height as we* as you
foot size. And the new
Bijou French heel so
leverly sA yor
aside and leg eetour!
In gy Ades inspired
by sunny France,
1 to IL

i

,A

a

A
ti

. ''

i.

,Y

k

°1

r-110-11010-11M

} f IfT A4[diOFAL fa'NUiY "~iY w'ISY

Under
perspi
is real
'nowl
_ __

,arm
ration
fly beaten
'F

SHIER...... . .1.65
ULTRA SHUR..1.95
Ann Arbor
MAIN AT LIBERTY

L
A

I,
__.f

if

l y,.

AI/

I

We've got what the Smart Co-ed
Wants for Easter...
A Short Coat with Flare
A Figure-Slim Suit
Both, within her reach at a price that's easy to
take! See the newest suits with their 51" shapes,
toppers with a young flair. All done with fashion's
lightest touch in crispest wools.

I

z

Spk Deodorant

I
a

3

5
Now comes -asuper deod
*ith even extremely exces

AWM-Iu

\

'ft

i

i

Is=

I.c I

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan