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March 07, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-03-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SIx

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

" WEDNESDAY, MARCH7 , 1951

VA PROJECT DELAYED:
Cold Winter Slows Hospital Completion,
A cold winter, labor shortages,.
and foundation difficulties will de-
lay completion of the Veteran's
Administration Hospital, being .
built on Geddes Road, until some-
time next winter, Dave Hedin, as-
sistant superintendent of the Hos-
pital's construction company, said
yesterday.
-Although the VA had originally
set July, 1951, as the deadline for
the building's completion, Hedin
indicated that his company has4
several time extension requests
pending in Washington.
*' * *
ANY ONE of the three difficul-
ties' should enable the company to
get its requested time extension,;
according to Hedin.:
"In the first place, the winter
was an exceptionally severe one,"
he said. "It was Just too slippery
and cold to do any outside work
for several months." .

Also, the difficulties encountered
in getting a solid foundation for
the building delayed construction
three to four weeks, Hedin implied.
The site was a very swampy one,
and before the footings were final-
ly completed, an extra $169,000 of
the taxpayers money was spent.
* * *
ADD TO THAT the shortage of
bricklayers and other laborers,
Hedin asserted, and it becomes im-
possible to meet the July deadline.
Material problems thus far have
been non-existent, according to
Hedin, although some of the scarc-
er items, such as aluminum and
copper, are becoming hard to get.

'Flute Score
Inspired by
Comic's Plot
Mozart's score for "The Magic
Flute," said by critics to contain
some of his greatest music' and
universally popular among the
general public, was really only an
afterthought.
The idea for the first production
of the opera came from an obscure
Viennese comedian Emanuel Schi-
kaneder. Back in 1791 he was
openipg his own theatre and want-
ed something special for its pre-
miere.
* * *
SCHIKANDER set only three
qualifications for the work. First-
and most important-It had to
contain a juicy part for himself;
second, it would have to have a lot,
of magic tricks in it; third, good
German music must be spread lib-
erally throughout.
The comedian took care of the
first two qualifications by writ-
ing the libretto himself. Un-
fortunately he was more inter-
ested in putting in a good part
for himself than in worrying
about plausibility, so that the
reslt was a hodge-podge of the-
atrical shreds and patches.
To do the German music, Schi-
kaneder picked Mozart, not be-
cause he had any great respect for
the composer's ability, but because
Mozart was rather well known and
would add popular appeal to the
production.
Now, 160 years after its premiere,
"The Magic Flute" will be pro-
duced here in Ann Arbor not be-
cause of Schikaneder's libretto, but
because of Mozart's "good Ger-
man music.,
The opera, produced jointly by
the speech department and the
School of Music, will open a five
night run tomorrow in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. Tickets are
now on sale at theatre box office.
J-Hop Elections
Top SLAgenda
J-Hop elections will take too'
notice at 7:30 p.m. today, when
the Student Legislature meets in
Dining Room 2, West Quad, the
guests of the Quad Council.
Discussion will center on whe-
ther to hold election of the J-
Hop Committee in the spring in-
stead of the fall, and a motion
will be presented to drop the
Hare System, used in elections of
past years.
John Ryder, '53L, president of
the Men's Judiciary Council, will
speak to the Legislature on the
new disciplinary plan. The meet-
ing will start at 7:30 p.m., and is
open to the public.

Co-Recreation Featured at I-M

* - *

* *

Many Sports Enjoyed
At Friday Night Sessions

:y

Local taverns, fraternity parties, dances and the movies are get-
Ling some heavy competition for the sought-after weekendtrade and
I-M Co-1Kecreation is the reason.
Every Friday night during the colder months, between 200 and
250 athletic-minded men and women flock to the local indoor sports
mecca for an evening of fun and recreation.
SINCE ITS inception in 1930, when its activities were limited to
swimming, Co-Recreation has enjoyed popularity as a unique way
to spend a weekend night.
The I-M staff have added an extensive program of sports since
co-rec's early days. Current participants, can enjoy paddleball,
volleyball, gymnastics, badminton, squash and occasionally, basket-
ball.
At present, cd-recreation bight" >and all of the sports are available
is open to all University students for unorganized participation. But
plans are now in the formation
' ' * *stage for organized leagues, made
{ , up of dorms, sororities and fra-
ter fzties.

WORKER WATCHES AS CONSTRUCTION CONTINUES AT
VET HOSPITAL
* * * *

,wx:
a

.....

Outside work on the 500 bed
structure should be finished some-
time in the summer, Hedin ex-
plained,' the actual date depending
upon labor and weather conditions.
The inside should be completed be-
fore wnter.

v

Lane Hall Sponsors Variety
Of Work, Travel, Projects

Students who want to work;
study or travel as a tourist over-
seas or in the United States this
summer can find information and
applications for a variety of tours
and work projects at the Lane Hall
Summer Projects Office.
Headquarters for more than a
dozen tour and work opportuni-
ties, the office is open daily from
3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. to provide the
summer activity seeker with a
number of possibilities for inex-
pensive vacation travel tours.
Play Time Change
The Arts Theatre Club per-
formance will start at 7:45 p.m.
today instead of at the regular
time of 8 p.m., Club Business
Manager Ed Troupin announced
yesterday.

The National Student's Asso-
ciation sponsors foreign travel
programs geared for the student
with limited funds. The applica-
tion deadline for these tours is
Friday.
In addition to NSA tour infor-
mation, the projects office is the
headquarters for the American
Youth Hostel, Students' Interna-
tional Travel Service, the Youth
Argosy, the Experiment for Inter-
national Living, World Council of
Church Tours, the Lisle Fellow-
ship and the American Friends
Association.
Information on study opportun-
ities in foreign universities and
on work projects and institution-
al and community work in the
United States can also be obtain-
ed at the office.

Circuit Court
To Try Student
Felix Mielzynski, '51, was bound
over to Circuit Court for trial yes-
terday by Municipal Judge Francis
L. O'Brien.
Mielzynski and Paul Kluth,
Grad., are charged with attempt-
ing to rob a N. University drug
store Feb. 22. Both men will appear
before the Circuit Court 3 p.m.
Monday.
Mielzynski has been held in the
County Jail since his arrest be-
cause he was unable to post the
necessary $5,000 bond. Kluth was
released Feb. 23 on a $2,500 bond.
SL Offers Help
For Tax Worriers
In case. you are confused about
your income tax, the Student Leg-
islature has arranged to help you.
Legislator Jim Nesbitt, '51 BAd.,
announced that perplexed students
may call the Collector of Internal
Revenue at 23628. If your problem
is too complicated to be handled
over the phone, you may go to
the Collector's office, 204 First
National Bldg., Nesbitt said.

MRS. MARY DUTCHER, '49,
AWAITS A SERVE IN PAD-
DLEBALL

GRACE BOOTH, '55A, LOOKS AT THE EVENING'S ACTIVITIES

* * *
IN THIS WAY, the co-sponsors
of co-recreation, the Department
of Physical Education for Women
and the Intramural Sports De-
partment, plan to offer the vari-
ous groups the opportunity to get
together with another group, or
be paired by the staff, for com-
petitive programs on a team and
league basis.
This program is scheduled to
get under way on March 9, and
entry blanks are now being dis-
tributed.
As it is now, many couples get
dates for a co-recreational sports
nights. But many other men and
women come stag to the Friday
night affairs.
* * *
SWIMMING STILL remains the
most popular sport. The pool is
open from 7:30 until 10 p.m. and
lifeguards, furnished by the Wo-
men's Athletic Assn., are on con-
stant duty.
In the gymnastics room, the
trampolines, parallel bars and
the other paraphernalia are
available, and supervision by
the gymnastics team is provid-
ed for safety purposes.
Rackets and balls are provided
for use in the many squash courts
in the buildings basement. Adja-
cent to these courts, are the hand-
ball and paddleball courts for
which equipment is also provided.
* .* *
BADMINTON BIRDS are the
only equipment that the staff
doesn't furnish, though it does
provide rackets. Despite this
handicap, badminton is one of the
most popular sports available.
No special dress is required
for participation in any of the
sports, but for those who wish
to don shorts upon arrival at
the building, separate locker
rooms and attendants are pro-
vided. Towels are free.
In charge of the whole program
is Bob Betzig, assistant wrestling
coach and his student assistant,
Dave Edwards, '52E. According
to Edwards, the program will con-
tinue every Friday night that the
building is not otherwise in use
until warm weather makes other
types of outdoor coeducational
recreation possible.
A
DA ILY
PHOTO
FEATURE
Story by
HARLAND BRITZ
Pictures by
MALCOLM SHANTZ

.

'A

I.

aotY
_ IiAf

rV

I

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TRYING OUT HER SKILL AT THE I-M SWIMMING POOL IS MARIE MARITA, '54

1 1 I

"I

Am w -f' e. e - ,G' Ord " ''" '<. .. . I:;:7s

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