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March 01, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-03-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

qw I . I I I

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'U' Press Does Land-Slide Business

* * * *

'U, Parking
Plait Hit by
City Police'
The Ann Arbor Police Depart-
ment yesterday turned thumbs
down on the University plan and
practice of shoving illegally parked
cars out into the city streets.
Police Chief Casper Enkemann
brusquely censured University of-
ficials for believing they could rid
campus parking lots of illegally
parked cars in this way-and get
away with it.
PREVIOUSLY, under the verbal
lashings of Ann Arbor alderman
James E. Green, Herbert G. Wat-
kins, University secretary and as-
sistant vice-president, had said
that "the practice was instigated
with the approval and understand-
ing of the city police.". n
But the police revealed neither
approval nor understanding yes-
terday. Conferring briefly with
University Plant Superintendent
Walter M. Roth, Chief Enke-
mann said Roth promised to
have his employees discontinue
the practice until they could find
some places to put the cars
other than in the city streets.
"It is my understanding that
the University employees placed
these cars in restricted parking
zones on the street, where our of-
ficers would naturally ticket them
for being illegally parked," the
chief said.
Chief Enkemann admitted that
such a practice had legal compli-
cations. "Our men are perfectly
within their rights in ticketing
those cars, of course, but who
should pay the fines, the car own-
ers or the University?
"After all, the owner didn't park
the car in that restricted zone on
the street. The University did."

Religious Music To Be Sung
At Choir Concert Tonight

4
,
1

Music with a religious theme,
sung in Latin will be featured in
the University Choir's first con-
cert of the semester at 8:30 p.m.
today in Hill Auditorium.

--Daily-Roger Reinke
FEAR REGISTERED-Art Nevins, playing a confused morgue
attendant, thinks Jim Briley is one of his morgue's boarders who's
somehow gotten back on his feet. The scene is from Al Nadeau's
farce "Morgue Duty" which is one of ,the plays on the bill of
one-acts opening tonight in the Mendelssohn T'4eatre.
Oane-Act Bill To Open Toay
WWith Sartre, Student Scripts

FINISHED PRODUCT-A pressm
versity announcement fresh off
gest press. The machine can pri
hour.
* * \*<
with the department since 1935,]
four years after it moved to its
present site on Maynard St.
Before that the work was done
in the General Library bindery of-
fice after the University found that
0 0

aan gives the once over to a Uni-
the printing department's big-
nt more than 4,000 sheets every
S* * *
commercial printers were slow in
filling the University's growing
orders. From that crude beginning
the printing department has grown
into what Lofberg terms a custom
printing busines.

Play Production's third bill of
one act plays will open a two night
run at 8 p.m. today in the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
The three plays to be presented
are "Morgue Duty," by Al Nadeau,
Grad., "Final Returns," by Jim
Gregory, '51, and "The Flies," by
Jean Paul Sartre.
Tickets for the bill are 30 cents.
They are obtainable only at the
theatre's box office, which will

Eagles Donate
Cancer Fund
Money To, '
A gift of $7,000 from the Damon
Runyon Cancer Fund was pre-
sented to the University yesterday
by Lester I. Johnson, Grand Aerie
vice president of the Fraternal,
Order of Eagles, and L. A. Morri-
son, FOE State Conductor of Ann
Arbor.
The money is a portion of the
Eagles' total contribution of $125,-
049 to the Runyon Fund. FOE
lodges raised the amount through
a series of social activities held
throughout the United States.
Prof. Walter J. Nungester, of
the Medical School, explained that
"the Eagle's' gift will be used to
develop biological techniques for
concentrating radioactive isotopes
into tumor cells for the general
purpose of increasing their effec-
tive use in treating cancer."
Provost James P. Adams, who
accepted the gift on behalf of the
University, indicated that since
the work will deal with radioac-
tive isotopes, the gift will be cre-
dited to the Phoenix Project me-
dical cancer research program as
was suggested by Johnson and
Morrison.
Union Now Offers
Weekend Service
The Union travel service, usu-
ally operated for vacation travel-
ers only, is being expanded to ac-
comodate daily a n d weekend
commuters.
All interested drivers and stu-
dents can fill out commuter cards
from 3 to 5 p.m. in the Union's
student offices. The cards will
be matched and arrangements
will then be made between travel-
ers.
This service is aimed at students
traveling regularly between Ann
Arbor and neighboring central
Michigan cities, although ar-
rangements can be made for
places as far away as South Pend,
Ind.

GROUNDED FOR GOOD:
Kiwi Bird Pays with Wings
For Frivolous Life of Ease
4 - . - --

Conducted by Prof. Maynard
Klein and accompanied by George
Exon, Grad., the Choir also will
present featured soloists.
Among these will be mezzo-
soprano Gloria Gonan, Grad. who
will sing "Jushua" by Moussorg-
sky with baritone David Murry,
Grad.
Moussorgsky's "Jushua" will be
a first performance of this work
in Ann Arbor.
Rose Marie Jun, a graduate
teaching fellow in the School of
Music, will perform as the soprano
soloist in excerpts from Brahm's
"Requiem." Miss Jun will also
perform in the coming Music
School - Department of Speech
production of "Magic Flute."
Other numbers to be presented
by the Choir include "Christus
factus est" by Sartori and "Cali-
gaverunt oculi mei" by Victori.
The Choir is composed mosly
of music majors who receive ere-
dit for participation. Students
from other schools also are in-
cluded in the membership but do
not receive scholastic credit.
Today's concert, like all Univer-
sity Choir performances will be
open to the public without charge.'
'U' NROTC Frosh
Earn TopRating
Freshmen in the NROTC here
were the top class in the country,
according to figures just released
by the Navy.
The freshmen rated highest in
a comprehensive exam given last
May to 51 NROTC units through-
out the country, Marine Col. Wil-
liam B. McKean, chairman of the
Dept. of Naval Science, reported.
The exam. dealt with history,
types of vessels and organization
of the Navy.

I

open at 10 a.m. both today and
tomorrow and will remain open
until curtain time.
Gregory's play is concerned with
the conflict of two philosophies
of life in a small-town political
campaign. In the play's cast are
Jeri Rich, William Hadley, Rich-
ard Teneau, Lois Ryan, Lloyd
Kaiser and Ken Rosen. Richard
Burgwin, Grad., is the director.
"Morgue Duty," the other stu-
dent written play to be presented
is a farce set, as the title indi-
cates, in a morgue. It tells the
story of the attendant of the
place who mistakengly takes a
drunken visitor for a corpse.
Nadeau is directing his play,
and Arthur Nevins, James Briley,
Paul Bagrow and John Daugherty
are in the cast.
The last of the trio of plays is
"The Flies" in which Sartre mixes
the Electra legend of Greek my-
thology and his own philosophy
and comes up with aplea for free-
dom from moral and superna-
tural tyrants.

+(

a

Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN PRICES

4x

The playboy of the plains-that
was the Kiwi bird until too much
night-life clipped his wings and
ruined his future, according to
Irving Reimann, Prefect of Ex-
hibits at the Museum.
"This night-owl ran around all
night and slept all day, curled up
in a little ball. His future was se-
cure-he had enough worms, and
never suffered from want. He just
TWO Clash8 in
Hot Campaign'
(Continued from Page 1)
pointed out that under his guid-
ance the city has expanded, has
developed a parking system that
is being copied throughout the
nation, has greatly improved its
water and sewage systems, and
has secured a Veterans Adminis-
tration hospital.
A program of improving the
city's streets is next on the
schedule, he said.
Reimann, on the other hand,
feels that the present city govern-
ment is out of touch with the
people. He has suggested the es-
tablishment of a Civic Unity Com-
mittee to be made up of represen-
t tives of all sections and interests
o Ann Arbor, to advise the mayor
and council on matters of human
relations, community needs and
consumer problems.
"My greatest contribution to he

had a good time all the time and
never thought of tomorrow," Rei-
mann said.
NO BIGGER THAN a chicken,
a stuffed present-day Kiwi can be
seen with his big feet, long beak
and wingless sides at the Museum.
* * *r
BECAUSE no animals were out
to get him down in New Zealand
where he lived long ago, the Kiwi
never had to fly away to escape
danger. So, he never used hiswings
when he had them, even for exer-
cise.
"He had a soft life and grad-
ually his wings wasted away into
little stumps. And even these
were camouflaged by his stringy
feathers," he continued.
It was then that a sheep-raiser
brought some rabbits into New
Zealand for hunting sport. This
changed the wingless one's whole
life.
S* *
"SOON THERE WERE rabbits
everywhere. Action had to be taken
-and quick-so the government
brought in dogs to get rid of the
active white pests. But the dogs
took out after Kiwi, too.
Since then, the Kiwi's help-
lessness without his wings has
made him practically extinct.
"Before the arrival of the dog,
the Kiwi was well-adjusted to his
environment. But now he's having
a tough time of it. He can't run
fast enough nor can he take off
for a safe tree-top," Reimann said.
The Kiwi bird is one of the few
living hold-overs from prehistoric
times, as is the 'possum.
"But that doesn't mean he'll be

LOAD-UNLOAD-A speedy midgit press in the University print
shop keeps two workmen on the jump supplying it with paper and
removing the printed material. It is one of the plant's ten presses.
French Underground Worker

FinallyBegins
After a long, five-year wait,
Mrs. Anne Ancelin-Schutzenberg-
er, of Paris, France, has finally
been able to begin graduate work
in psychology here at the Univer-
sity.
Helped by a $3,000 fellowship
from the Soroptimist Internation-
al Association and a Fulbright
travel grant, she arrived in Ann
Arbor at the beginning of this se-
mester. She is now working with
the Research Center for Group
Dynamics at the Institute for So-
cial Research.
IT WASN'T until 1950 that Mrs.
Ancelin - Schutzenberger received
the fellowship, though as early as
1945 she was notified that the
Allied Aid to the Underground
Movement had proposed her for
the grant because of her efforts
during the war.
Last year a fellwsliip offered
by the Soroptimist group was
finally obtained and Mrs. Ance-
lin-Schutzenberger made plans
to enter school this fall.
Before the war, Mrs. Ancelin-
) Schutzenberger received a law
degree from the University of
Paris and later worked in the le-
gal department of an insurance
company.
After the liberation of France,
she became interested in psycho-
logy and decided to make a career

Work at U'
in this field. She obtained a
master's degree in psychology
from the University of Paris and
at present she is the editor of a
leading French psychology jour-
nal.
Mrs. Ancelin-Schutzenberger is
also on the staff of the Depart-
ment of Psychology of the French
Ministry of Labor.

E-
LU
-W
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V!
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2:
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citizens would be made in the living for long. With extinction an
field of human relations. The everyday possibility, it's a little
present mayor had a chance to too late for him to start mending
establish such a committee four those burned bridges," Reimann
years ago and he passed it up." added.

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