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October 03, 1950 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-03

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, OCTOBER, $, 1950

4

Symposia Urge Probe
Of Overall Atom Effects

(Continued from Page 1)
investigation and licensing by the
Atomic Energy Commission is fol-
lowed in granting private industry,
the right to experiment with the
atom, it would be at least a year
before research could be started.
IMPORTANCE OF PHOENIX
A revision of the law is needed,
Loftus claimed. As it stands, he
said, full compliance with the law
is impossible.
"What is done now, however,
by such projects as the Phoenix
memorial, will be of great aid
when we do end the atomic mo-
nopoly by the government, and
set forth on a life whose possibili-
ties have only been scratched."
The AEC is compromising be-
tween t h e complete secrecy
regarding atomic research and
turning all known facts over to
private enterprise, according to
Morse Salisbury, director of AEC's
information service.
"If a war were ten years off we
could release our information to
industry and depend on our ad-
vanced technology to pull us
through an atomic production
race," Salisbury declared.
As it is, the United States has
to !work out a mid-way method of
controling its information, he said.
USE MASS OPINION
Rensis Likert, director of the
Survey Research Center here, urg-
ed use of scientific method by
social scientists in their work in
atomic research.
"The people of the world should
pressure their governments to ac-
celerate change. It is up to us to
find methods of directing mass
opinion for this pressure to speed-
up the move to international con-
trol of the atomic bomb," Likert
said.
And/Prof. Robert Angell, of the
sociology department and
UNESCO, joined with Likert in
asking for a union of man against
atomic welfare.
As social scientists, he pointed
out, we must make the people
realize that there is no need for
one culture to exist except in basic
aspects-we must scientifically
study the bridges between cultures,
and make them work to unite us,
in one world.
Scientific Aspects
We must constantly strive for
new and different ways of apply-
ing the known facts of atomic en-
ergy to physical and biological
sciences, Shields Warren, a mem-
ber of the Atomic Energy Commis-
sion declared yesterday.
Warren was a member of the
symposium on "Atomic Researcht
in the Physical and Biological Sci-l
ences" held in Kellogg Aud. Otherx
members of the symposium wereY
George G. Brown, also a member
of the AEC, Prof. H. R. Crane of
the University physics departmentz
and Dean Ralph A. Sawyer of the2
graduate school, who acted ast
moderator.Y

Warren said that biological sci-
ence stepped into the atomic field
mainly because they needed new
techniques of research. "Biologi-
cal science hadn't got successful
answers to many of its problems,
therefore they adopted the use of
'tagged atoms' to aid them in find-
ing the answers," he explained.
PRACTICAL USES
Advances have been made in the
problems of stock piling blood
through the process of radio-acti-
vating the iron in the hemoglobin
of the blood, he said. After being
held for a period of time, the con-
dition of the iron can be checked
by calculating the radiations from
the radio-active iron, Warren ex-
plained.
Warren also told of how differ-
ent varieties of peanuts have been
developed after the seed had been
placed in an atomic pile. where
mutations in the genes of the pea-
nut took place.
Discussing atomic energy from
the industrial viewpoint, Brown
told of a process called breeding
(the production of new fissionable
material in excess of that con-
sumed) which if successfully de-
veloped, will make nuclear power
generation an economic possibili-
ty.
"This power would only be an-
other source of energy and would
not provide free energy as many
have hoped," he explained.
Brown sees no commercial use
of atomic power in the near fu-
ture, except that which might ae
left over as a by-product from
military experiments.
INDUSTRIAL APPLICATIONS
Industries that are first to es-
tablish relations with nuclear phy-
sics laboratories in the universities
will be the first to find applications
in their own industrial problems,
Prof. Crane said.
Prof. Crane believed that indus-
tries should go to such pioneers
in atomic research as the AEC and
the U.S. Navy in an attempt to
learn the possibilities of practical
applications.
Citing some limited examples of
industrial use of atomic energy,
Prof. Crane told of how in the
past it took industry six months
to check the wear of an engine
bearing.
Now it can be done in a half
an hour by making the bearing
radio-active and then checking
the oil with a geiger counter, he
revealed. "From the reading of
the geiger counter, the amount of
wear can be calculated," Prof.
Crane said.
He believed that the reluctance
of industry to adopt atomic met-
hods is characteristic of many
new innovations, such as electro-
nics, of which industry later made
great use.
Prof. Crane pointed out that
radio-active materials are avail-
able to industry, the only restric-
tion being that they can safely
handle the material.

'Ensian .tic
.Quota Only
rHalf Met
"Only half the quota on senior
and graduate pictures has been
met," Clarence Kettler, business
manager of the 'Ensign announced
today.
Kettler, making a plea to those
seniors and graduates who have
not yet made appointments for
their yearbook pictures, warned of
the time limit on the sittingk.
"The photographers will be here
only as long as there are appoint-
ments to be taken care of.
As an incentive to prospective
"sitters," music will be pouring
from radios into the studios, and
there'll be plenty of candy and
nuts passed around to make the
twelve minute stay relaxing.
"All seniors and graduates who
expect degrees in February, June
or August are eligible for these
pictures," Kettler said.
Appointments can now be
made either.in the Student Publi-
cations Building from 9 a.m. to
noon, and in the afternoon from
2 until 5 p.m., or by phone.

'"' ,,

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Here's. a smart-as-paint way to draw attention: don
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BLOUSES
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See them in Detroit at J. L. HUDSON'
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-2

GENERAL SPEAKS-Gen. Douglas MacArthur (at rostrum) speaks at ceremony in the Capitol
building at Seoul. He is returning the seat of the Korean government to Syngman Rhee (second
from left), who is President of the South Korean Republic. Gen. MacArthur later called upon
the North Korean government to surrender in a broadcast statement.

Austin, Eisenhower Telephone
Messages to Atom Day Rally

(Continued from Page 1)

which marked the start of' a
month-long national drive to raise
$6,500,000 for the memorial.
AUSTIN HITS RUSSIA
Austin blasted Russia for her
use of the "big lie" as he did
throughout August in the hot
word-battles in the UN Security
Council.
UN Statistician
To TalkToday
Prof. P. C. Mahalanobis, direc-
tor of the Statistical Institute of
India, will speak on "The Indian
National Sample Survey" at 4:15
p.m. today in Rackham amphi-
theatre.
Prof. Mahalahobis, who is chair-
man of the Sub-commission on
Statistical Sampling of the Uni-
ted Nations, has developed and
conducted sample surveys since
1937.
During the past ten years Prof.
Mahalanobis has conducted sur-
veys on such varied topics as crop
acreage and yields, family budget,
preference of radio programs in
India and postal and highway
traffic.
The lecture will be given under
the auspices of the mathematics
department and the Survey Re-
search Center.

4
But, he declared, the way of life
of the free world, which is truth,
will triumph over this lie.
"Russia does not have the power
to veto the dream of the people
of the free world to use the atom
for a better life."
Russia has sown the seeds of
her destruction, he said. "Truth-
our way of life-will triumph."
Gen. Eisenhower declared that
the Phoenix plan is a part of the
gigantic battle for a freedom,
which can only be sustained in a
peaceful world.
HAILS MORAL STRENGTH
He named the moral strength
of the Western world its greatest
power. "The gangsters of the world
do not even recognize such a
force," he said.
And we must muster all our
strength and resources for this
battle, which may nowseem end-
less, but which you at the Univer-
sity have set up as a great cause
for the Phoenix Project.
Concluding the program ' of
speeches, music by the Marching
Band and Men's Glee Club, Presi-
dent Ruthven, Fritz Crisler and
Chester H. Lang, chairman of the
drive urged alumni to support the
campaign, which is the first the
University has ever conducted.
President Ruthven repeated that
the memorial project is the great-
est undertaking in the University's
history, and expressed his pride
in being associated with the idea.

Plaits Fold for
.Drama Series
The first Speech department of-
fering of the 1950-51 play pro-
duction season will be Shake-
speare's "Midsummer N i g h t is
Dream," it was announced yester-
day.
It will open a series of plays pro-
duced entirely by students in the
department of speech under facul-
ty direction. Students enrolled in
play pro are the only ones eligible
to participate in the season.
The speech curriculum includes
classes in all types of stage skills.
Generation Tryout
A tryout 'meeting for the Busi-
ness Staff of the Generation Mag-
azine will be held at 4:15 p.m. to-
day at the 'Ensian office in the
Student Publications Building, ac-
cording to. Norma Chud, '51.
7F(TryJLLETT'S- First
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