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October 01, 1950 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

smNDAY, OCTOBER 1, 190

T HE MICHIGAN DAILY

?AGE 8I~VEN

Wisconsin . . . 28 Texas . . . . .. . 34 So. Methodist . . 32IIlinois....... 28' Iiidiaiia . . . . . . 20 I Notre Dame . . . 14 Northwestern .
~1
Marquette ... . 6jPnrdue . . .... 26~Ohio ~Iate . . . * 27Ohio U. . *.*.. Nebraska .... . 2O1North Caroline . 7IIowa State ...
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S~ .-~' ~.. '~A**~ '~ _______________
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. 23'Washington . .. 28
.13 Minnesota .. .. 13

(Continued from Page 1)
ped the ball to Sonny Grandelius
who was standing undefended on
he left flank.
lHe steppedl into paydirt un-
touched, as Spartan rooters went
wild.
STRONG FORWARD WALL
Earlier in the opening period,
the tense Spartan fans .were de-
nied the opportunity to cut loose
as the then hot Michigan forward
wall held for downs in a series of
four plunges that began on the
Michigan three.
The Wolverines took possession
of the ball less than a foot from
their own goal line and Ortmann
dropped back to punt. He un-
corked a spiraling kick that sailed
more than 60 yards through the
sky and came down 52 yards from
scrimmage.
Neither team scored a first down
and the resulting exchange of
punts gave State the ball on their
own 33, whence began their early
tOrtmann received Spartan Bob
Carey's after-touchdown kickoff
on the Michigan goal and skipped
through the State tacklers for 36
yards of broken field ground gain-
ing, but was slow from getting

out of the pile after the tack. .g|
was made.
He took a direct pass from cen
ter on the next play, and as lh
shifted his weight to pivot, th-
Michigan passer dropped to tb
and was unable to see action
the remainder of the contest. Th
he will be available for next wee]
contest is still questionable.
The Big Ten co-champs dro
hard as they made two stror
scoring bids. Late in the secor
period, with fullback Don Duf(
carrying most of the load, tI
Wolverines rolled 55 yards, bi.r*
were stopped on State's 22.
Earlier, they penetrated to tL
MSC 10, but were halted when ~ '--al E om
speedy Jesse Thomas intercepted-ay-Kom
Putich' pass attempt. NOT ENOUGH OF THIS-SPARTANS STOPPED ON GOAL-LINE IN FIRST PERIOD
ALONG WITH Grandelius and
Craneg inthea unexpectedl strongPR RCe S TMO M T 6 f
poised junior, needled the weak ti ie m k r r y C n u r o g t
Michigan pass-defense with his
accurate aerials all afternoon. e C m TR L Ra 1 ,4 -
Eeciv n key snnts Craneue'o e yO o gGalp,2-

TOO MUCH OF THIS-LEROY CRANE SCORES MSC'S SECOND TOUCHDOWN
* * * * * * * * *
LOCK ER ROOM CONTRASTS-:,
M nn Laud Spirited Pla of Spras

By BOB SANDELL
"I' extremely proud of my
kids. They turned in a tremen-
dous, spirited performance."
These were the words of~ a happy
Clarence "Biggie" Munn yester-
day afternoon just after his cou-
rageous Michigan State Spartans
had finally snapped the long string
of Wolverine victories that had
stretched back to 1937. *
* * *
"BIGGIE" wouldn't single out
any outstanding performer on the
squad, claiming they all played
good. He thought the turning
point of the game was Jesse Tho-
mas' pass interception in the wan-
r ug moments of the contest.
The State lockier room was a
scene .of wild cheering and sing-
ing. Quarterback Al Dorow was
hieard to say, "This Is some-
thing I'll never forget. We're
going to be a tough team to beat
this year."
Of his pass interceptions the
ed that he just happened tobe in
the right place at the right time.
* * *
OVER IN THE quiet of the
Michigan dressing room, Coach
Bennie Oosterbaan praised the
Sipartan team and singled out Al
Wahi and Tony Momsen as play-
ing exceptionally for the Wolver-
ines.
Charlie Ortmann was a pie-

ture of disappointment and sor-
row as he slowly dressed. Char-
lie injured his ankle in the first
quarter and didn't return to
the contest.
Oosterbaan didn't think any-
body else was seriously injured.
They got their usual bumbs and
bruises.
A key play in the fourth quar-
ter was a beautiful tackle by Le-
roy Crane on a punt to Frank
Howell . . . Crane nailed the
Wolverine sophomore on the
four yard line and two plays
later Thomas returned Koceski's
punt to the Michigan 19. setting
up the winning sc... . . Michi-
gan changed tleir defense in
the second half to almost balt
the Spartan passing attack. ...
The Wolverines let their ends
fall back to cover the receivers
and as a result State completed
only two passes for 23 yards as
compared to six for 85 in the
first half.
Michigan's first quarter goal
line stand brought to mind the
1948 WolverIne defensive line
which pulled the trick regularly
...Both teams made extensive use
of the two platoon system, sub-
stituting 7 to 9 men when the
ball changed hands . . . . Wolver-
ines who saw a lot of double duty
were Leo Koceski, Don Dufek, and
Sophomore Lowell Perry. ...

Michigan's passing attack was
handled by an exclusive group,
alphabetically speaking. . . . It
was nearly always Putich or Peter-
son to Picard or Perry.
Michigan probably used the "T"
formation more than they ever
have in a single contest. . ...
Bill Putich passed from his quar-
terback position and mixed up the
attack with quick opening plays
through the line and passouts to
the halfs and the fullback.
DETROIT--Detroit's Red Wings
who won the National Hockey
League championship and Stanley
Cup playoffs last season, will test
their mettle against the best the
league can muster in the annual
All-Star game at Olympia Sun-
day, Oct. 8.
The game wvill be a major test
for the Detroiters, who juggled
their personnel pretty sharply in
off season trading.
With the previous three games
all having resulted in All Star
victories, manager Jack Adams
and his crew have set their sights
on becoming the first Stanley Cup
defender to win the blue ribbon
contest of hockeydom.

' ' Mich.'
Rushin Yardag 109
Passin Yardage 133
Passes Attempted 32
Passes Completed 13
Passes Intercepted 1
Punts 8
Punt Average 38.7
Fumbles Lost 1
Yards Penalized 25

MSC
158
108
19
8
2
8
40
0
25

set up the winning touchdown
by smashing through a line of
Michigan blockers and diving
low to tackle the Wolverines,
Frank Howell who received a
punt on his own four. Dufek
dove to the seven, but when Ko-
ceski punted from his own goal
with second down and seven
showing on the scoreboard,
Thomas returned to the Michi-
gan 19.
With 11 minutes and 40 seconds
remaining in the final quarter,
Grandelius carried to the eight
and Crane dove through center
and bounced over the goal. Carey
again converted and the 14-7
score remained unchanged.
Two minutes of playing time
remained in the game as the
Spartans ran four plays from
their own 35 and then punted to
Putich who reversed the ball to
Koceski who in turn was smoth-
ered on the spot.
The Wolverines then had the
ball on their own 24 with 32 sec-
c o On the first play. Putich
long pass was again intercepted
by Thomas and State rooters be-
gan laying plans for the destruc-
tion of the goal posts.
I Line-Ups

University of Michigan Oratorical Association
SPECIA L RAT E FOR ST U DENTS-Second Balcony, Unreserved-$2.40

TeXas,_3-2 6

CHAMPAIGN, Ill.-(IP)-Illinois
mixed a strong rnning and pass-
ing attack yesterday to post a 28
to .2 victory over an outclassed
Ohio University team.
The game, played before 32,685
spectators in Memorial Stadium,
was only five minutes old when
Illinois' Sam Piazza, 150-pound
halfback raced 40 yards for the
first touchdown. After that, Illi-
nois dominated the game com-
pletely.
* * *
JOHNNY KAILRAS, the Argo
Express who led Big Ten ground
gainers last year as a sophomore,
passed for one of the Illinois
touchdowns and scored another.
Dick Raklovits, who made several
dazzling runs, counted the other
touchdown.
Ohio University's only real
threat came at the start of the
game when Illinois fumbled the
kickoff and the visitors recover-
ed on the Illini 33-yard line.
Tom.Anderson completed a pass
to the two-yard stripe. After a
penalty put Ohio back to its seven
yard line, the Illinois defense held
Fre Maors who way maved up
to first string quarterback after
Don Engel was injured a week
ago, kept the Ilhinois attack roll-
ing with his accurate passing.
Ohio scored a safety in the
fourth period to escape a shutout.

AUSTIN, Texas-('P)-The Uni-
versity of Texas Longhorns, two-
touchdown favorites over Purdue's
Boilermakers, were hard pushed
to win 34 to 26 before 40,000 spec-
tators here yesterday.
Texas' passing attack was not
as sharp as usual but it accounted
for two touchdowns, while a vastly
improved running game sent
Longhorn runners across the goal
line three times.
PURDUE HELD Texas to a 7-7
tie in the first quarter and was
close enough on the Longhorn's
heels to keep Texas fans nervous
until the late moments of the
final period.
Sophomore left half Gib Dawson
scored twice for Texas, once on a
24-yard pass play in the second
quarter and on a pitchout good
forwo y~ards and the final touch-
Ferocious defensive play by left
end Leo Sugar, the outstanding
lineman of the day, helped Pur-
due make a game of it. He did a
great job of rushing the Texas
passers and accounted for the
Boilermakers' second - touchdown
by recovering a fumble hehind the
Texas goal line.

for Students interested in
Business Administration or Economics.
Come over and meet Students and
Faculty in Your Field!
____ON

WEST POINT, N. Y.-(IP)-Vic
Pollock, a slender, speedy halfback
from Linfield, Pa., set a Michie
Stadium record with a 94 yard
extenddw it ubeaten football rec
ord to 21 consecutlves games .by
whipping Colgate 28 to 0'.
Pollock's run was just one of
several long gallops that provided
a one-sided score for a game that
might otherwise have been close,
or even disastrous for Army.
Fullback Gil Stephenson gal-
loped 55 yards to set up the

Sunday, Oct. 1

1212 Hill SI.

3-5 P.M.

MICHIGAN
Perry ..
Clark
Popp

Pos.
... LE

M.S.C.
....R. Carey
King
Dibble
Dekker
..... Coleman
Stevens
Kozikowski
.. ...Yocca

Iopening touchdown In the first
quarter. His substitute on the
offensive, Al Pollard, scored
scored on a 47-yard run In the
second period and Jim Cain and
Jack Martin reeled off long runs
that failed t. produce.
Stephenson made -two' of the
touchdowns, scoring the first on an
eight-yard of f tackle drive after
his long dash and the third on a
three-yard plunge at the end of
Army's one concerted drIve. P01-
lard, tabbed as Army's secret wea-
pon, kicked all four extra points.

ii

Johnson ......LT
Hess
Powers .....LG
Kinyon
McWilliams
Pad jen .. .. ....C
Momsen
Farrer
Kelsey....... RG
Jackson
Wahl .. . .. ...RT
Ohlenroth
Alli ........ RE
Putich...... .QB
Palmer
Billings
Ortmann . .. .LH
Peterson
Koceski ...... RH
Howell
Dufek ....... FB
Zatkoff

.. ..Tamburo
Bolthouse
Weaver
....Tobin
Kuh
....Horrell
Stroia
..... Mnarik
*...... Dorow
Jones
W. Carey
... Grandelius
J. Thomas
Mc uhife
.....Vogt
Pisano
Benson
.....Crane
Timmerman
SPanin I

ATTENTION?
GRADUATES

DAVID LILIENTKAL
Former Chr. Atomic Energy
Commission
"The Atom In Peace and
War"

and

SENIORS

CHARLES LAUGHTON
Distinguished Actor
"The greatest demonstra-
tion of a orie-man theatre
seen in years." - Montreal
Star.

T hose expecting to receive their

Career-man's watch N /\

E G A

diegrees

in February, June

or

BENNETT CERF
Humrs
Pres. Random House
"Changing Styles in
American Humor"

LOWELL
In
One of the Great Adven-
ture Stories of Our T ime
"Out of T his World:
A Journey to Lhasa"
Color Motion Pictures

"The Truth About the
Aom Bob

This 1 7-jewel stainless steel automatic winding
Omega with sweep second hand is water-resistant.
Automaalystrs p 6-r:eer ve-a owid
sportsmen, doctors, laboratory
technicians. $95.00. (F.T.I.)

August have only 19 more clays
in which to maize their picture
appointments for the 1951 year-
b00k, the Michiganensian.

Other Omega Automatics
from $71.50

Master of the Documentary
"England ina Changing

II -

Office hours are 9-12 A.M.
and 2-5 P.M., Monday through
Friday.

JOHN MASON BROWN
Noted Author and Critic

C)

U '~VN liii

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