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September 20, 1950 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

F)I
J /EDNESflAY, SEPTEMBF4R 20, 1950
r

TI1V MICHIGAN DAILY

Phoenix Project Studies Atom Effects

STUDENT SUPPLIES

O)

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<a

(Continued from Page 1)

budget is how and where the mo-
ney will be acquired. In the main,
it will come from the University's
125,000 alumni, different founda-
tions, business leaders, industry
and the like.
CHESTER H. LANG has been
appointed national chairman to
handle this prodigious fund-rais-
ing job. Prof. William Haber of
the, economics department is the
faculty head.
And Marvin LubecY, '51, is in
charge of the student drive. A
student goal of from $100,000
to $200,000 has been set.
It is with no little amount of
justification that the University
will serve as a center for this vast
program of research on the po-
tentialities of atomic energy for
peacetime uses.
* * *
FOR THE UNIVERSITY has
engaged in atomic research for
more than a quarter-century now.
From 1923 on, when scientists -
J. Robert Oppenheimer, A. H.
Compton, Lawrence Condon, Bohr
Pauli, Ehrenfest, Dirac, and Fermi
- assembled here in a summer
symposium, research has been con-
ducted here. Today these scien-
tists who taught and studied in
the summer sessions are the key
men in atomic research.
During the second World
War the dniversity served as
the chief purchasing agent for
the Atomic Bomb Project. Many
Jniversity faculty members,
such as Brown, Crane and Den-
nison played an important part
in the development of the atom

the uses of atomic energy will
have a powerful inflence on each
of their respective fields.
Already magazines, newspa-
pers and commentators through-
out the country have commend-
ed the University for undertak-
ing the Project.
President Ruthven has made
trips through the Northwest and
the Southwest, and Provost James
P. Adams in the East, stirring up
enthusiasm for what Ruthven has
termed "the most important Uni-
versity project ever undertaken -
one bigger than the University it-
self."
* * *
EVEN THE "Voice of America"
program has publicized the aims
and purposes of the Phoenix Pro-
ject.
Thus far $35,000 has been gi-
ven to schools and departments
in the University for research
and the development of plans
for future experimental facili-
ties.
Faculty members received a
working fund grant of $60,000
shortly after the first announce-
ment of the project in the spring
of 1948. They have since explored
the effects of isotopes on thyroid
tissue and blood disease. Effects
of radiation on plant growth and
plant genetics have also been
tested.
FURTHER TESTING of the
uses of isotopes has been carried
on in chemical structure, cosmic
radiation and nuclear disintegra-
tion.
Also to be undertaken by the
Project is the building of an
atomic engine. Prof. Paul F.
Chenea of the engineering col-
lege has asserted that the prob-
lems of building an adequate
powergenerating pile are so
multifarious that the Phoenix
Project will aid the government
greatly in this job.
Chenea and his assistant, Al-
fred R. Bobrowsky, have plans to
investigate some of the problems
connected with the construction
of an atomic engine.

"ATOM FOR PEACE DAY," or
some day with a similar designa-
tion, will serve as a kickoff .day
for the project, and will be Oct.
18.
On that day the nation's top
scientists will have a special din-
ner in Ann Arbor, and a figure of
"world-wide importance" will
speak on behalf of the Project
over the radio.
Although students will partici-
pate in the national kickoff day,
they will have a special day of
their own on Nov. 10.

TYPEWRITERS
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fountain Pens Repaired by factory-trained man.

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G.I.
Requisitions
Accepted

Since
1908

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Phone
7177

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ATOMIC GEYSER-A huge geyser shoots up from the sea during the atomic bomb tests taken at
the Bikini Islands after the war.

* * *
B E S I D ES PROVIDING the
,many aforementioned scientists,
in 1935 the University had the
world's largest cyclotron, which
has produced over 100 rare iso-
topes.
Last summer a unique pro-
seminar was held by the
University. Entitled "Public
Policy and Atomic Energy," it
was conducted by Prof. Marshall
E. Dimock, of Northwestern
University's political science de-
partmgnt.
It is the social implications of
atomic energy rather than the
phrysical that were stressed in
this proseminar. Up to now
nearly all of the research con-
ducted on the uses of atomic
energy has been carried on by the
physical scientists, but plans
relating to the political scientist
aspect, as found in last summer's
proseminar, are rapidly being car-
ried forward.

* *
RELATING THE present know-
ledge of public control to atomic
energy and training individuals to
do research, writing and teaching
of the subject are the objectives
of the course.
For this reason it ras received
the hearty endorsement of the
A t o m i c Energy Comn ission,
and many of its members have
come from Washington to ad-
dress the class.
An idea of the many ramifica-
tions of the subject can be gained
by considering the fact that the
head /of the business school and
professors of economics, sociology
and forestry have attended many
of the proseminar's sessions.
* * *
COUNTLESS QUESTIONS and
problems are hoped to be solved
by the research to be done by the
Phoenix Project. Some of them
are these: the causes and cures
of cancer, leukemia, arthritis,

* * *

ti11

rheumatic fever and polio; the
manner in which disease-causing
viruses reproduce, and their con-
trol; the improvement of our land
and agricultural techniques.

for the entire semester

WE THOUGHT THIS AD WAS A GOOD IDEA

At the Bikini Bomb Tests, Ralph
Sawyer, dean of the graduate
', supervising the work of 500
ool, served as technical direc-
entists.
George Granger Brown, chair-
i of the department of chemi-
1 and metallurgical engineering,
director of the Atomic Energy
immission's Division of En-
ieermng.
Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN PRICES

Uses of atomic power in both
industry and the home; the ef-
fects of atomic energy on our
economic and social life; and
the consequences of exclusive
governmental control of atomic
fuels.
Many University faculty and ad-
ministration members have de-
clared that the Phoenix Project,
which will get under way in ear-
nest this fall, will have a wide-
spread effect.
* * *
PROFESSORS Fred J. Hodges
of the roentgenology department;
Lewis M. Simes of the law school;
Robley C. Williams of the physics
department; and William Haber
of the economics department all
have indicated that discoveries opn

CAN YOU?

BUT WE COULDN'T FINISH IT.

TRADITION-LADEN:
Michigan Union Is Men's Retreat

When
Easy
Laundry Service
Counts
Our
Method
Excels
Save
Time
Unnecessary. wear
Dollars
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Serving as a place where all men
students can retreat from the hus-
tle-bustle of the rest of the cam-
pus, or take a refreshing dip in
the pool, is the Union.
Abounding in tradition, the Un-

ion's most noted rule of decorum is
through its front doors.
* * *
IT IS THE Union that acts as
the center of the many male ahiv-
ities on campus. Every Friday and

---------

-..-.......

........

I'll

MICHIGAN STUDENTS
We welcome you to the beautiful campus
of the University of Michigan

Saturday evening, excluding those
weekends when a major event is
being held, a dance is given in
the big second floor ballroom.
Different campus events are
often sponsored by the Union, as
last spring, when it was one of
the sponsors of the gala Michi-
gras carnival.
All male students, once having
paid their tuition fees, are eligible
for membership cards. These cards
entitle the holder to take advant-
age of the many facilities which
the Union offers. Besides swim-
ming, one can settle down with a
good book or magazine in the Pen-
dleton Library; spend a little spare
time knocking down the pins in
the bowling alleys; take a turn at
the billiard tables; work up an ap-
petite on the ping-pong tables; or
indulge in a little less strenuous
exercise by playing checkers or
chess.

Michigamua and the Men's Glee
Club have their offices in the
Union.
Incoming freshmen are invited
to smokers at the Union during
Orientation Week, at which time
they have the opportunity to meet
and talk with representatives of
different campus organizations and
many members of the athletic
'teams.
IT WAS IN 1907 that the Union
first opened its doors on a location
which had formerly been the home
of Judge Cooley. In 1912, a wing
was added to the "hub" of men's
activities, but even with this ex-
tension the quarters soon proved
to be too small.
Hence, in 1915 a $1,000,000
campaign was launched, with
the money going towards a new
site. Alumni and undergrad,-
uates alike contributed to the
drive, and since then another
million dollars has been spent on
further additions.
One member of the Board of
Regents, faculty members, alumni'
representatives and students com-
pose the Board of Directors of the
Union, and it governs the Union's
activities. Any second semester
freshman with scholastic eligibility
may join the staff of the Union.

You May Use this ad as your
ENTRY BLANK
Just fill in the missing words.

Visit our newly remodeled and newly equipped store.
Use our New Maytag Automatic Washers . . . they get
Clothes really clean. Complete fluff drying service.

Be sure to visit the MUSIC CENTER, Inc. for
* RECORDS
* SHEET MUSIC
* RADIO & PHONO COMBINATIONS
* TAPE RECORDERS

* TELEVISION

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* * *
IN THE MAIN lobby is a counter
where members may cash checks,
or buy current magazines, news-
papers, bus tickets, cigarettes, and
candy. The Union also has a bar-
bershop.
Especially during the football
season weekends, the 195 guest
rooms of the Union are occupied
by many of Ann Arbor's visitors.
Big easy chairs, couches*and
writing tables are found in the
main floor lounge, and upstairs in
the Edward Waldo Pendleton, '72,
Library popular magazines and
many bestsellers are quartered.
* * *
DOWNSTAIRS, in the Taproom,
meals and afternoon or evening
snacks can be obtained. Here an-
other Michigan tradition, that of
tabletops carved with the names
and initials of alumni, can also be
seen.
Different campus organiza-
tions, such as the Inter-Frater-
nity Council, Vulcans, Druids,

Open Evenings

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