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September 29, 1950 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

."

x

ON THE SPOT
By BILL CONNOLLY
Daily Sports Editor

'UST HOW GOOD are the 1950 Wolverines?
A month ago, the newsstands broke out in a perennial rash
of national magazines which gave their readers everything from
non-commital reiterations of press releases, to out-on-the-limb
predictions of things to come in the football world.
It is interesting to note that Michigan gained in favor as the
early stages of the rash developed into epidemic proportions..
Early ratings had the Maize and Blue battling it out with Illi-
nois, Ohio State and Minnesota for top honors in the Big Ten with
a Rose Bowl bid as the incentive for all but the Buckeyes.
In this category is the prediction of Francis . Powers, quoted
from "Illustrated Football Annual": "From this swaying obser-
vation post, it looks as if Michigan, Illinois and Ohio State will
be among the first four (in the Western Conference).
"With a photo finish indicated, no sane citizen will jeopardize
life, limb and reputation by saying more unless it is to add the
obvious: that no team will go through the Conference scramble un-
defeated."
RUT IF MICHIGAN followers were at all encouraged by reading.
between the lines set down by Mr. Powers, they had only to visit
their newsstands a week later to renew an acquaintance with one
Tommy Devine.
Devine will be remembered as the writer who--through his
critical articles in last fall's "Detroit Free Press"-did so much
to help the Wolverines upset a power-laden invasion by Min-
nesota forces.
Blasting the Wolverines as "wilted," "riding on their reputations,"
and "demoralized," Devine was for a week the most mentioned man
in the shadows of Angell Hall and the Engine Arch.
The entire student body was incensed as his criticism which
was based the Wolverines' showing as they bowed before Army and
Northwestern on successive weekends.
This feeling was reflected in the spirited support of students
and homecoming alumni alike, as they cheered the inspired Maize
and Blue eleven to a 14-7 upset over the invaders.
And how speaks Mr. Devine this season?
Pointing out in Street and Smith's football annual that: "Illinois
won the Big Ten crown in 1946 and was the first team to represent
the Western Conference under a five-year agreement with the Pacific
Coast Conference for a "closed-door" Rose Bowl policy," he adds,
"now the arrangement is in its final year and Coach Eliot's out-
fit is favored to make a return visit to Pasadena."
Inconsistant with the latest prognostications is his comment that:
"For the first time in four years Michigan goes into a Big Ten race
without the favorite's crown."
UT IF MICHIGAN fans lost any sleep over that one, that had only
a few nights to do so, for later in that August week, Stanley
Woodward's 1950 version of his annual publication directly entitled
FOOTBALL hit the stands.
This authorities' authority wasn't content to hand the Wolverines
the Big Ten crown.
He picked them "Best in the Midwest" and gave captain
Al Wahl and offensive cog Charlie Ortmann All-American men-
tion to boot.
Cautiously citing the fact that: "The Western Conference race
will be as rugged and uncertain as ever," he continues with: "The
best bet to win it . . . is Michigan, where Coach Bennie Oosterbaan
has much of his 1949 strength and a helpful sophomore delegation."
And that turned on the pressure. The epidemic broke.
Grantland Rice crawled out on a limb in LOOK magazine and
picked the Wolverines as the fourth best team in the nation.
Fred Russell, writing in THE SATURDAY EVENING POST,
repeated Rice's prediction by naming Notre Dame, Army, Tennessee
and Michigan in that order.
The United Press' poll of major coaches-latest and probably
last to be released-pushed the Wolverines up to the third rung and
dropped Tennessee to the fourth slot.
. . . .

I-MA
Fraternities
Set for -1
TitleRace,
Sig Eps Seek Fourth
ConsecutiveTrophy
By KEITH MILLER
"Break up the Yanks!" What old
died in the wool baseball fan
doesn't recall that famous quota-
tion?
This fall a similar cry is being'
heard down on Fraternity lane and
that is "Break up Sigma Phi Epsi.
lon!"
For two consecutive years Sigma
Phi Epsilon has won the Intra-
mural fraternity sports trophy,
symbolic of athletic supremacy on
campus.
Under John Branaman, athletic
director, the Sig' Ep's won six
titles in handball, volleyball, pad-
dleball, bowling, cross country and
softball. They also tied for the foul
throwing contest.,
Last year's second place squad
was Sigma Chi.
Bob Ohlheiser, this year's ath-
letic chairman at Sigma Phi Epsi-
lon, says, "We have lost a lot of.
men, but we will be in there fight-
ing."
Competition in football begins
next week with track and cross
country soon to follow.
The following are the final
standings for competition last

Ltivities

O

TO

--aily-lan Reid
FLYING HIGH-The parallel bars and trampoline pictured
above are just a small part of the equipment available to all men
students in the gym room of the Intra-Mural building.

I~rtt
Unique Rules.
overn I-M
. The Intra-Mural football season
which starts next week, has a set
of rules all its own.
The teams are composed of sev-
en men; a center, two ends and
four backfield men, all of which
are eligible to receive passes.
No tackling is permitted.' The
ball is declared dead when a de-
fensive player touches the runner
between his head and knees with
both hands simultaneously.
The, field itself is marked off
differently having four twenty
yard zones instead of the usual
ten yard stripes. To earn a first
down, the offensive team must ad-
vance the ball from one zone into
the next within four downs.
A fumble or pass is dead at the
spot of the fumble. A backward
or lateral pass is dead where it
touches the ground. A kick be-
comes dead and is a touchback if
it touches anything behind the'
receiver's goal line.,
Blocking is permitted but must
be done without the use of hands
or extended arms. The blocker
must remain in an upright posi-
tion. Running over or battering
down an opponent is penalized for
unnecessary roughness.
In the event that the game ends
in a tie after regulation time (two
15 minute halves), each time will
play a series of four downs and
the } team with the greatest plus
yardage will be awarded a touch-
down.
LACROSSE
Lacrosse has been added to this
year's program after a very suc-
cessflul beginning last fall. This
year, however, it is hoped that
enough people will turn out to
make possible regular league com-
petition. Anyone who would care.
to take part should sign up at
the Sports building.

Next

,;
a..i
W ../ J

' .Announces
All A Students
(Continued from Page 2)
Alice Lee Platt, George M. Porters
Marcia Rabinowitz, Dorothy Jean
Rapp.
Virginia Florence Reese, Jasper
Braley Reid, Jr., Daniel Edward
Riley, Robert L. Roensch, Richard
George Roland, Ella Kathryn
Ross, Edna Alberta Russell, Mar-
shal David Sahlins, Charlotte Sar-
kowski, La Verne Marie Schmit-
kons, Nigel Phileda Schnauder.
Richard P. Schulze, Robert
Lynn Shaffer, Carl Wilson Sig-
nor, Jean Harriet Silvers, Lee
James Silverthorn, Jr., Nary
Patricia Simmons, James R.
Simonsen, Raymond J. Smit,
Pamela Stamp, Mary Louise
Stone, David Hessig Strack,
Norma Kay Streaker, Bailey T.
Strain.
Joseph William Streidl, Roy
Richard Swift, James M. Thorne,
Frederick Donald Truesdell, Rod-
ney L. Veenstra, Richard John
Wall, Richard Kress Werr, Robert
E. Wester, Ralph Harding White,
William Dean Wilkins, John Ken.
neth Wilkinson, John Edward Wil-
liams, Richard Lawrence Wood-
hams, Rollin Harry Yale.

Pro gram
Notes
STANDINGS
* * *
INDEPENDENTS
1. Mich. Christian Fell.«.
2. Newman Club .........
3. Forestry .......
4. Hawaians'..........
5. Robert Owen Coop.....
6. Big Reds ......... ....
7. Lutherns........
8. Michigan Coop.......

Residence Halls Prepare
For Football Competition

By JERRY BALBUS
With the opening of the I-M
sports program slated for next
week, the residence halls are hard
at work getting their teams in
shape for the first competition in
football.
Last year's race for the top hon-
ors in over-all activity went to
Hayden House as they garnered a
record breaking total of 1542
points.
The Haydenites pushed their
victory home with championships
in five individual sports and run-
ner-ups in four others. They fin-
ished ahead of the pack in hand.
ball, paddleball, 'A' bowling, re-
lays and indoor track and will be
looking for repeats in these events
this season.
In the second slot in the trophy
race was Williams House which
compiled a total of 1417 points
during the year. It was Hayden's
ability, however, to beat"Williams
on the playing field which told
the tale in the end.
The East Quadders won six of
the nine contests they had with
their rivals from the West.
Williams House took champion-
ships in both football and wres-
tling and placed two of their men
on the All I-M eleven. Backfield
stars Bob Fancett and Al Leavitt
were the ones chosen. Neither of
these men will be back this year,
however, to try and keep the
title for the third straight year.
Football was one of the few
times Williams took the measure
of Hayden but they had to go into
overtime in the final round be-
fore finally doing it, the game
being tied at 0-0 after the regula-
tion time was up.
The following are the final
standings for residence hall com-
petition last year:
1. Hayden ............. 1542
2. Williams ............ 1417

947
904
845
606
520
420
400
370

year:
1. Sigma Phi Epsilon ...
2. Phi Delta Theta.
3. Beta Theta Pi.
4. Chi Psi.
5. Sigma Chi ...
6. Theta Chi..........
7. Sigma Alpha Epsilon .
8. Delta Upsilon .....
9. Kappa Sigma ........
10. Zeta Psi........

1519
1373
1315
1305
1241
1217
1170
1160
1136
1096

PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITIES
1. Nu SigmaNu.........947
2. Law Club 'A' ......... 817
3. Delta Sigma Pi ........ 792
4. Phi Delta Phi........ 791
5. Delta. Sigma Delta .... 724
ALL-CAMPUS
The first of the All-Campus
Tournaments to be held this year
will be Fall Tennis. All men in-
terested should contact the Intra-
Mural Department before next
Wednesday, October 4. These
events are open to all male stu-
dents on campus, graduate or un-
dergraduate.

3. Tyler ................ 1291
4. Michigan.......... 1229
5. W~inchell ........ 1200
6. Wenley .............. .1173
7. Lloyd ............... 1152
8. Adams .............. 1116
9. Prescott ............. 1106
10. Cooley .............. 1087
11-Greene, 1049; 12-Anderson,
908; 13-Hinsdale, 839; 14 -
Pravs, 827; 15-Chicago, 823;
16-Allen-Rumsey, 738; 1 -
v augnn, 735; 18-Fletcher, 587;
BAD.
-}
Because you lose valuable
time waiting for
haircuts?
Next time Phone 2-7647
THOMPSON & STRUBLE
BARBERS BY
APPOINTMENT
Standard Prices
304 SOUTH STATE
alt
mI
WHI AT STYLE

11-Phi Sigma Kappa, 1077; 12
-Theta Xi, 1037; 13-Alpha Tau
Omegas 1036; 14- Sigma Alpha
Mu, 1029; 15-Alpha Sigma Phi,
995; 16-Phi Kappa Psi, 987; 17-
Phi Sigma Delta, 966;, 18-Zeta
Beta Tau, 941; 19 - Acacia; 933;
20-Phi Gamma Delta, 922.

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