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January 18, 1951 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-01-18

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.195

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TH TCTTTjEj j VAN L7 C)TT.x.

L.LJ 1
sM

SYMBOLISM QUESTIONABLE:

'Ghost of Dadaism' Hangs in Museum

F

By ALICE MENCHER
An ordinary black snow shovel
hangs in stark simplicity on a
wall of the University Museum of
Art.
Intruding upon the colorful in-
tricacies of the cubist art work
surrounding it, this shovel is the
ghost of a bizarre protest move-
ment of the 20's known as "Da-
daism'
AFTER THE CLOSE of World
War I, a group of young writers
in Paris, disillusioned and dis-
gusted by the state of the world,
resolved to stage a protest in a
literature that would "set peo-
ple's teeth on edge."
The way in which they chose
a name for their enterprise was
indicative of the singular pro-
eedures they used in all their
activities. Opening a dictionary,
they chose, at random, a word
on the page and took its first
syllables-so 'Dada' came into
existence.
During its short but chaotic
history the Dadaist movement
presented the public with some
unique spectacles.
It was not unusual for the Da-
daists to give lectures that were
drowned out by the sound of
ringing bells, or to have six mem-
bers of the 'cult' read different
manuscripts to the audience si-
. multaneously. They were busy,
too, electing for the group 391
presidents who were to serve con-
currently.
PUBLIC DSAPPROVAL of the
movement reached a hysterical
New Republic1
Editor To Talk
In Ann Arbor
Michael Straight, editor of the
New Republic, will arrive in Ann
Arbor today for a series of per-
sonal appearances.
First on his agenda will be a
lecture on Asia at 12:15 p.m. today
at a luncheon in the First Method-
ist :Church. Radio station WPAG <
will interview Straight at 2:15 p.m.1
At 4:15 p.m. in the Rackham Au-E
ditorium, he will deliver a lecturec
sponsored by the journalism de-1
partment: "Peace without Ap-
peasement; Can Liberal Journa-
ism Provide an Answer?"
At 6 p.m., Straight, who is
also chairman of the national
American Veterns Committee,
will report on the activities of AVC
at a dinner in the Union The
room number will be posted in the
Union lobby.
The dinner will be sponsored by
the local chapter of AVC. Those
who are interested in attending_
should contact Arthur M. East-
man of the English department
immediately.
In conclusion, Straight will also
speak on the topic, "After Korea,
What?" at 8:15 p.m. in the Archi-
tectural Auditorium. "This lec-
ture is being sponsored by the As-
soiation of Independent Men and
AVC as a campus service to those
who were unable to hear Straight
at the other lectures and to those
who would like to hear him again,"
Dave Belin, '51 BAd, senior ad-
visor of AIM, said yesterday.
WE'RE NOT TRYING
TO SCARE YOU
...DBUT...
PRICES are going up, materials
are getting scarce, we have al-
ready been rationed on base
metals and papers.
ORDER your programs and
favors NOW for your spring
parties and be sure of getting A

what you want at a price with-
in your budget. A phone call
will bring a representative with
ligation.
complete sample lines. No Ob-
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I

WRITES 'LUCRETIA' SCORE:
Student Composer'
By DAVIS CRIPPEN
The young composer who used will be a long score,
to struggle unknown in a freezing all, Chudacoff esti
attic garret, is a thing of the past 45 minutes.
-now he helps earn his keep by Chudacoff seemedc
playing the accompaniment for over the project. Hep
modern dance classes, duct his own score, w
At least if his name is Ed Chau-
dacoff he does. Chudacoff is the
man whom Inter-Arts has picked
to do the elaborate score for its
production of "The Rape of Lucre-
tia." For eight hours a week the
fledgling composer pounds the pi-
ano keys for the dance classes, the
rest of the time he goes to school$
and composes.
* *
CHUDACOFF, WHO is working
for his MA in Music, has become
one of the best known of the cam-
pus' student composers in the lastf
few years. He contributed a num-
ber of songs to the first postwar
Union Opera "Froggy Bottom,"
doubling in brass by also doing the
lyrics for one of these.
In addition he has done the
incidental music for a number of
campus productions, Play Pro-
duction's 1948 staging of "The
Tragical History of Dr. Faus-
tus" by Christopher Marlowe
and Inter-Arts Union's "Murder
in the Cathedral" by T. S. Elliot.
At the present time besides the
score for "Lucretia," Chudacoff is
devoting some time to a song cycle
and an opera. The libretto of the
opera will be by Dan Waldron, '51,
whose "The Woods Are Still" was
produced last week on the one-act HE'S SATISFIED-
play bill. satisfiedly as he ad+
Chud a cof f said that he "The Rape of Lucre
doesn't find working on a number "Tiefrtpeof ur
of projects at once in the least music for the prod
confusing. "I spend a lot of time
considering before I put anything
down on paper. All I need to do isp c dn a e
keep my considering separate" he ,
explained. TechnieoL
Since "The Rape of Lucretia"
will be produced J-Hop week-
end, most of his effort's are now Eight members of
devoted to the music for it. It Bowl football team

s Piano Pays Way
running in for an orchestra of 20, as well as
mated, some a speaking chorus of 12.
"Never before," he said, with a
quite excited glint in his eye, "have I had a
plans to con- chance to tell so many people what
hich will call I to do."
* * * *

Daily Staff
Changes Made
Several appointments for the
business staff of the Michigan
Daily were made at the last meet-
ing of the Board in Control of
Publications.
These include: Robert Miller,
'52E, circulation manager; Char-
les Cuson, '52 BAd, local advertis-
ing manager; Gene Kuthy, '52,
promotion manager; Ina Suss-
man, '52, classified manager;
Sally Fish, '52, and Harvy Gor-
dan, '52 BAd, accounts, managers;
Eva Stern, '52, layout; and Lucy
Goldstone, '52, national advertis-
ing manager.

W--

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'DADAIST' DEVICE--The mild quizzical interest displayed by
Judy Lager, '54, is typical of the student attitude to this unusual
"work of art," and is in marked contrast to the wave of shocked
disapproval that met its appearance in 1921.
* * *
pitch, and for the first time in
world history audiences were
roused to tossing real beeksteaksCa p sH onor
along with the usual collection of
rotten eggs and tomatoes. G o p l c
Undaunted by this, the Da-
daists proclaimed triumphant-
ly that "all true Dadaists were New O fficers
against Dada."
Not confining their infiltration
to one field, however, the Dada- Three honor societies have re-
ists formed a religion, and in a cently installed officers for the
deliberate attempt to offend art spring semester.
lovers, Marcel Ducham, a leader Calvert Shuptrine, '51E, has
in the movement, placed a store. been installed as president of Chi
purchased snow shovel in a New Epsilon, honorary civil engineer-
York art exhibit, titled it "In Ad- ing fraternity.
vance of a Broken Arm" and Other new officers are George
signed his name to it. Marek, '52E, vice-president; Ed-
It is a replica of this mutely win Krysinski, '51, secretary; Wil-
'eloquent' shovel that hangs to- lam Dykstra, '51E, treasurer; Alan
day in the University gallery. Knoll, '52E, local associate editor
Prof. Jean Paul Slusser of the of the fraternity publication,
school of architecture and design "Transit"; and Reuben Tyali, '51E,
said, in commenting on the in- Engineering Council representa-
:lusion of the shovel in the ex- tive.
hibit, that its presence has caus- New Triangle officers are War-
ed none of the "scandal and fur' ren Gast, '52E, president; Dean
or it excited in New York in ear- Lind, '52E, secretary, and Dave
lier years." Barrett, '52E, treasurer.
Phi Eta Sigma, freshmen man's
Correctionhonorary, elected Harold Herman.
president; Carl Brunsting, vice
Contrary tp a story which president; Lyle Carr, secretary;
appeared in The Daily yester fHascell Cohen, treasurer and Jack
day, Curt Sachs, music.gon" Fontaine, historian.
sultant for the New York Pub'
lie Library, will lecture on
"Music and the Eighteenth Read and Use
Century" at 4:15 p.m. today In Dail. Classiieds
Rackham Amphitheatre.!

Student composer Ed Chudacoff, Grad., smiles
ads another touch to a part of his score for,
etia." Chudacoff is composing the incidental
iction which will be given Feb. 9, 10 and 12.
rs To Help Narrate
or Rose Bowl Filma

THE DOWNTOWN STORE FOR MICHIGAN MEN

i_.

" w} serve to Serve dqcgun
309. SOUTH MAIN STREET

the Rose
iand two

Four Day Stand
Drama Continues
"Command Decision" continues
its four-day run with the second
performance at 8 p.m., today, in
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Tickets are on sale for the pre-
sentation at the special student
rate of 60 cents for any seat in
the house. Prices for tomorrow
and Saturday are $1.20, 90 and.
60 cents, and the theatre box of-
fice will be open from 10 a.m.
until curtain time.
The play deals with the diffi-
culties military officers have in
making important decisions when
they are entangled in political
red tape and hindered by interfer-
ences of the press.

coaches have been lined up so far
to help Bob Morgan, of the Uni-
versity Alumni Association, nar-
rate the Ann Arbor premier show-
ing of the 1951 Rose Bowl movies
on Saturday and Sunday, M Club
President Bill Stapp announced
last night.
Chuck Ortmann, Larry LeClair,
Pete Kinyon, Fred Pickard, Ralph
Stribe, Leo Koceski, Roger Zat-
koff, and Tom Kelsey will chip.
in their services during the six
showings, as will Cliff Keen,
coach of the University wrestling
team and Don Robinson, assistant
football coach.
The technicolor movies will be
free to everyone. There will be a
silver collection taken, the pro-
ceeds to be split between the
March of Dimes and the World
Student's Service Fund.

The film will be shown in Hill
Auditorium at 2 and 4 p.m. on
Saturday, and 2, 4, 7, and 9 p.m.
on Sunday. It is sponsored by the
Student Legislature, the M Club,
and the University.
It

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