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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 17, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-01-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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Draft Takes
Only One
"U' Student
(Continued from Page 1)

'Command Decision' Will Open

Today

* * *

* * *

* * *

-~ /__

"Command Decision," Play Pro-
duction's third major dramatic
presentation, will open its four-
performance run today at 8 p.m.
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
The story of the hit play is pri-
marily concerned with the moral
responsibilities of a hard-boiled,
but basically understanding, com-
manding officer of an American
Air Force division.
* * *

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ed as drafted revealed the errors
in the breakdown figures.
BESIDES THE student who
had not requested a postponement
one had withdrawn "expecting to
be drafted,- one withdrew on the
first day of school and another
received his induction notice be-
fore he had enrolled.
A check on the fifth "draftee"
disclosed that he had enlisted.
The accuracy of the remaining
part of the University's list is
doubtful. In breaking. down the
amount of withdrawals into serv-
ices a rather loose method was
used.
IF THE STUDENT wrote "to
enter military service" he was
called an enlistee. If he wrote
"recalled . to active service" he
was listed under the reserves. One
student mentioned the National
Guard. Those who claimed they
were "drafted" were listed under
that category, without any check
being made.
Actually, it is mandatory un-
der section S1 of the Selective
Service Act of 1948 that the in-
duction of a full time student be
postponed until the end of the
academic year.
A student actually is enrolled
at the University only for a se-
mester. Therefore a statement
saying that he is enrolled for the
second semester should be sent to
his local draft board unless the
student has already received a
postponement until June.
In Ann Arbor all student in-
ductions are being postponed un-
til June.
Speech Assembly
To HearBriggs
University vice-president Ro-
bert P. Briggs will speak on "Edu-
cation is our Business" at the
speech department assembly to-
day at 4 p.m. in Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
Dean Ha'yward Keniston will
open the program by introducing
Briggs who will consider the de-
tails of residence hall operation
and also the University's physical
plant expansion program.
The assembly is open to the
public free of charge.

NOW HEAR THIS-James White, '51, (center) playing Maj. Gen. R. G. Kane tells Ron Soble,
portraying Col. Ted Martin what the word from Washington is. Meanwhile, Al Nadeau, Grad.
who takes the part of the cocky Sgt. Evans displays his disinterest in the proceedings by pouring
himself a cup of coffee.

WRITTEN IN anger against the
meddling of politicians and high-
ranking brass in Washington, ac-
cording to its author, William
Haines, the drama also shows the
confusion and bitterness caused
by the heedless criticising by the
public and the press who are not
acquainted with the reasons for
military decisions made by the of-
ficers.
In view of the current world
situation, the presentation of
"Command Decision" has be-
come more timely than the
speech department had anticipat-
ed, according to Prof. William
P. Halstead, director of the play.
Because the commanders in Ko-
rea are at the present moment
faced with making decisions that
are unceasingly open for blasts of
disapproval, the play will help keep
its audiences to see a different
view of the various aspects in-
volved in wartime problem solving,
he said.
THE ALL MALE cast will in-
clude Wafe Katter, Grad; James
White, '51; Warren Pickett, Grad;
Ted Heusel, Grad; and Albert Na-
deau, Grad.
Tickets for the production will
be on sole at the theatre box of-
fice from 10 a.m. until curtain
time on all four days of the run.
They may be purchased for today
and tomorrow's performances at
the special student rate of 60 cents
for any seat in the house. For
Friday and Saturday they are
priced at $1.20, 90 and 60 cents.

Ann Arbor Atmosphere
Spurs Cerf's Memories

The main effect a day in Ann
Arbor had on Bennett Cerf evi-
dently was to bring back mem-
ories of his college days back at
Columbia.
This was the impression gained
from a late afternoon interview
with the publisher-author-racon-
teur in his room at the Union.
* * *

exchange. It. was one of the best
college magazines then." In his
undergraduate days, Cerf edited
The Jester, Columbia's equivalent
of the Garg.
"You know," he went on, a
memory coming to him, "some-
times these things go a little too
far. One time back at The Jes-
ter we had a copy of the Syra-
cuse Orange Peel which had
gotten that magazine booted off
campus.
"For a few days there, our of-
fice was the most popular spot
on campus. Standing room only.
We charged 50 cents a look and
almost paid off our deficit," Cerf
concluded proudly.

Kiwanis Club
To Have Sale
A plea for old clothes, books and
other salable items has been is-
sued by the Ann Arbor Kiwanis
Club.
The contributions will be sold
at the annual Kiwanis rummage
sale Jan. 25, 26 and 27 at the Arm-
ory on the corner of Fifth and
Ann Sts. The proceeds from the
sale will go to youth activities in
Ann Arbor.

GLANCING AT the last
The Gargoyle, Cerf said,
member we used to get

copy of
"I re-
this in

'Ensian Meeting
All students interested in sell-
ing the 1951 'Ensian are urged
I hfl Hec.',. Tnp*T~pn-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Sold at The Student Publications Building, Mon.-Fri., 9-12, 2-5

a

by promotion manager oje ne
lein, '53, to come to a meeting at BUT COLLEGE magazines
4:30 p.m. today at the Student aren't what they were in his dsy,
Publications Building. Cerf declared. "The ones in the
There will also be a meeting at east anyway are all too busy imi-
5 p.m. today for those who have tating The New Yorker, to turnI
already signed up. out any good original issues. I

(Continued from Page 3)
Research Club: 8 p.m., Rackham
Amphitheatre. P a p e r s: "The
crossbreeding of Spanish and In-
dian cultures in the colonial art
of Peru," by Prof. Harold E. Wet-

ERCAS ARETiNDFIES OWPRCEICR

WANTEED0m'
TONS and TONS of TEXTBOOKS
whether they are used here again or not
CASH or TRADE
ULRICH'S - Ann Arbor's Busy Bookstore

' .
.,

hey; "Modern ideas concerning the
principal avenues of distribution of
plants in North America," Prof.
Rogers McVaugh.
Graduate Political Science
Round Table: Wed., Jan. 17, 7:45
p.m., Rackham Assembly Hall.
Program: student panel-discus-
sion on "Crisis in Southeast Asia."
All interested persons invited. So-
cial hour following discussion.
Opening tonight: "Command De
cision" a gripping, tense war dra-
ma presented by the Department
of Speech at 8 p.m. at Lydia Men-
delssohn Theater. Special rates for
students available tonight and to-
-morrow night. Tickets for all four
performances on sale at the Men-
delssohn box office, daily 10 a.m.
-8 p.m.
U. of M. Soaring Club: Meet-
ing, 7 p.m., Room 1042, E. Engi-
neering Bldg. A definite decision
on the tow plane will be made;
summer soaring will be discussed.
All members are urged to attend
and all interested are welcome.
Ullr Ski Club: Meeting to dis.
cuss between-semester ski trip. No
movies. Room 3-D, Union, 7:30
p.m.
W.A.B. Square and Folk Dance
Club: Meet in W.A.B., 7:30-9:45
p.m.
Comning Events
Alpha Phi Omega:.Regular
meeting, Thurs., Jan. 18, 7 p.m.,
Room 3-A, Union. All members
who intend to work at registration
are to be present so the time sche-
dule can be set.

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LAST 10

DAYS!

t st longer, lower, wider lk1g.car look!

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4i
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Saturday, January 27

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EVERY GARMENT WE MAKE IS INDIVIDUALLY
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Only ten more days in which to take advantage of these truly amazing
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For Instance .. ..

NEW SHIPMENT
of
Imported Enamel
JEWELRY

Anthropology Club: Meeting,
Thurs., Jan. 18, 7:30 p.m., West
Conference Room, Rackham Bldg.
Speaker: Prof. Mandelbaum.

*

$62.50 Suits . . . . NOW.... ... .... .
$79.50 Suits . . . . NOW. ...........
$9150 Suits . . . . NOW.. ...........
(Quotations are for 2-Piece Suits)

$63(60
-$*7 320

90i At4 4d
330 Maynard
CHICAGO COLLEGE of
OPTOMTRY
National lyAccredited
An Outstanding College in'
a Splendid Profession
Entrance requirement

All other suitings, sport coatings, trouserings, overcoatings,
etc., similarly reduced. Some tropical worsteds and other hot
weather fabrics included, so buy NOW for summer, too.

III

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