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September 29, 1950 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-29

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'' FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 29; 1950

PAGE THREE

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

c:.......y{4v4t";=I N A' ar.'vl LLA Mr'fk tn:al'

-11-11

JUST RECEIVED!
New Shipment of Those Popular

f,
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BLACK

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with Red or White Rubber

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2 j
f "'

Tuttle S-ays
Education To
Meet Crisis
}c
Education should fare better
during the current international
crisis than it did during World
War II, Edward M. Tuttle, execu-
tive secretary of National School
Board Association, said last night.
Tuttle, who also is a member of
the National Committee for Mo-
bilization of Education, spoke be-
fore a dinner meeting at the Un-
ion which wound up a one-day
conference of school board mem-
bers, school officials and others
interested in education.
AT A MORNING session in the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre the
conferees heard speeches by State
Senator Don VanderWerp, chair-
man of the Senate Committee on
Education, and Lee Thurston,
state superintendent of public in-
struction.
Education now has a top pri-
ority second only to national
defense, Tuttle asserted.
"We are involved," Tuttle de-
clared, "in a war of ideas and this
war may be won in the classroom
rather than on the battlefield."
IN HIS SPEECH VanderWerp
struck out at the state support re-
cently given to school busses for
parochial students.
"The cost per pupil is $40 a
year," VanderWerp said, "and
6,289 non public school pupils
were given transportation to
school at public expense during
the laws first year. Thus the
total cost is about $251,000 at
the moment," he continued.
VanderWerp objects to the law
because he feels it furnishes a
threat to public schools' appropri-
ations in the future, he said. The
public may ultimately be paying
for everything in the parochial
schools except expenses directly
connected with the teacher-pupil
relationship, VanderWerp warned.
Soph Satire
Calls Tiryouts
The last period of tryouts for
Soph Satire will be held from 4 to
6 p.m. today in Rm. 3G of the Un-
ion.
The Satire, open to both men
and women, will be one of the fea-
tured events of Tug Week, in -ad-
dition to the sophomore and
freshman class rallies and the an-
nual tug of war.
Sponsored by the Student Legis-
lature, the activities are sched-
uled for October 27 and 28.

ALL IN THE LINE OF DUTY-A military policeman with the
U.s. 24th division on the southern front in Korea searches a
woman refugee for possible hidden weapons.
MEr0 0 T B AL L
by JOE HARRIS

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