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January 12, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-01-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

"AGE tSi

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRAY, JANUARY 12, 1951

.. ..

Students, Teachers Here
For Music Conference
More than 1,000 music teachers end Sunday following the A
and students will flock into Ann nual Midwinter Concert of t
Arbor this weekend to take part University Symphony Band.
in the Sixth Annual Midwestern *
Conference on School Vocal and EARL R. SIFERT, chairman
the Commission on Seconda
Instrumental Music. Schools, of the North Central A
The conference will begin with sociation, will be the featur
registration at 8 a.m. today and speaker at a banquet to be h
* * * at 5:45 p.m. today in the ballroc
T' T Sym ony of the League.
A proposed recommendatio
B n ToPB dthat music contests be discox
tinued will be considered as
part of today's activities.
Sunday at Hill symposium, headed by L.
Fisher, Chairman of the Nort
Central Association of Colleg
The University S y m p h o n y and Secondary Schools, will di
Band, conducted by Prof. William cuss the proposal at 8:30 p.
D. Revelli, will present its first in Ann Arbor High School.
formal concert of the school year , * *
at 4:15 p.m. Sunday in Hill Au- DON GILLIS, composer a
ditorium as a part of the Sixth NBC program director will tE
Annual Midwestern Conference part in a discussion of "Radio
on school music. Television-Their Place in Mu
Two soloists are scheduled to Education," at 4:30 p.m. today
appear on the program with the the Union.
Symphony Band. Keig Garvin, a
featured trombonist with the U.- The all-state high scho
S. Army Band, will play "Mor- band,bchorusrand orchest
ceau Symphonique" by Guilmant. will be featured in concer
ceauSymhonque y Gilmnt.starting at 3:30 p.m. tomorr4
V i n c e n t Melidon, principal in Hill Auditorium.t
clarinetist with the Symphonyi
Band, will be featured in a fan- One of the all-state conce
tasy on themes from the * opera highlights will -be the first p
"Rigoletto" by Verdi. formance of "George Washing
Among the concert offerings Bridge," a work by William Sc
will be a scenario from "South man, president of the Jul1t
Pacific," the current musical hit School of Music, who will cond
by Richard Rodgers. the playing of his own comp
tion.
The arrangement to be played He was commissioned to do
is the work of Floyd Werle, who work by the Michigan Sc
scored the work last spring. Vocal Association, the Univer
Admission to the concert is Extension Service and the U
complimentary. versity's School of Music.

'HANDLEBARS' MENACED:
Wax Shortage Hits Mustache-Wearers

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By ZANDER HOLLANDER VOICING THE feelings of
Already decimated, ranks of determined few, Pete Hall,
mustache-wearing students were twisted his "handlebars" as
hit hard this week by a growing made his stand.
shortage of mustache wax. "It took me over six weeks
To meet the problem beeswax, get the mustache wax I ha
vaseline and even lipstick were now and until then I used an
pressed into use by die-hard ex- thing I could get - even li
ponents of the lip-foliage. But stick. That was the worst.
less-stubborn mustache - owners smelled."
trimmed their "bushes" to man- * * *
ageable size and some even con- OTHER mustachioed studi
sidered getting rid of them en- were surrendering to the short
tirely. however.
* * * Don McHenry, '51, form

the
'52,
he
to
ave
ny-
ip-
It
ents
age,
ier

the concoction is developing,
primarily because whaling -op-
erations, which provide a prin-
cipal ingredient in most of the
preparations, are being curtail-
ed by current mobilization ef-
forts.
To at least one coed though,
the effects of the shortage were
welcome.
"Now maybe they'll get rid of
those things," Donna Mayer, '53,
said. "Students with mustaches
just don't belong in college."
* * *

t
1
i
t
1
r

possessor of a Stalinesque
adornment had trimmed his to
a modest growth which no
longer required wax.
And heartened by the wide-
spread trimming and cutting of
the hirsute adornments, Jorge
Barros, Grad., from Argentina,
was reconsidering removing his
mustache completely.
"Mustaches are stylish among
Argentine students," Barros ex-
plained. "But here it feels out
of place on my lip."
A CHECK of local cosmetic
counters revealed that the short-
age is largely the result of the
few calls dealers have for the
wax. Thus few of them stock it
at all.
But a national shortage of

Campus
Calendar,
Petitions-Campus groups have
only until 5 p.m. today to turn in
petitions for co-sponsorship of
movies with the Student Legisla-
ture's Cinema Guild, according to
Irv Stenn, '52, chairman of the
Cinema Guild board.
" Monday will be the final day
in which applications for three
positions on the Men's Judiciary
Council may be submitted, Dave
Brown, '53, SL public relations
chairman has announced.
* * *
Lectures-Prof. A. C. Krey, of
the history department at the
University of Minnesota will speak
on "Who Teaches American His-
tory" at 4:15 p.m. today in Rack-
ham Amphitheatre.
Prof. A. J. Eardley, of the ge-
ology department, will give an
illustrated lecture on the "Tec-
tonic Framework of North Amer-
ica" at 8 p.m. today in the Nat-
ural Science Auditorium.
Movie-The second University
Museums program offering for
the new year will be "Crafts and
Customs Around the World," fea-
turing a movie entitled "Here Is
the Gold Coast" to be shown at
7:30 p.m. today in the Kellogg
Institute Auditorium.
Read Daily Classifieds

An exhibition of the abstract,
conceptual artwork of Prof. Ger-
ome Kamrowski, a group of pic-
tures from the Yale University
collection and items from the
"Michigan Water Color Society"
will be the features for January
in the galleries of the Rackham
Building and the University Mu-
seum of Art.'
Included in Prof. Kamrowski's
exhibit are examples of his ex-
periments in new painting tech-
niques,

Well-known throughout the
world for his original expression,
Prof. Kamrowski's present display
is in great part a pictorial report
of the results of the research he
did in Paris under a grant award-
ed by the Rackham trustees for
work abroad.
The exhibition "Michigan Wa-
ter Color Society" includes the
paintings of two faculty members
of the College of Architecture and
Design, Prof. Jean Paul Slusser,
and Prof. Donald B. Gooch.

New Art Exhibit Features
'U' Professors' Paintings

,I

-£;

Start the New Year
RIGHT
at the
Open: 8 A.M. to 8 P.M. weekdays
7:20 A.M. to 4:40 P.M. Saturday
510 E. WILLIAMS PHONE 5540

i

RESOLUTE MUSTACHE-
OWNER-Pete Hall, '52, twists
his lipstick-impregnated "han-
dlebars."

WAIVERING "REEXAMINER"
-Jorge Barros, Grad., Argen-
tine s t u d 6 nt, contemplates
shearing off his mustache.

LOST LETTERS:
Incomplete Addresses Cause
Headaches for 'U' Workers,

"Betty, U. of Michigan, USA"
was the only address the letter
bore.
This letter with a South Amer-
lcan post mark was typical of
hundreds received by the Office
of Student Affairs monthly which
defy identification of the ad-
dressee.
OWHENEVER the post office
can't locate a student by the ad-
dress on a letter they unload it
on us," sighed Miss Dorothea
Leonard, receptionist, "and we
get some funny ones."
The letter that had the most
people guessing, she recalled,
was one addressed to a co-ed
five feet two, with blue eyes
anid blond hair. No further in-
formation was given.
* * *
MANY LETTERS from foreign
nations must be sent to the In-
ternational Center to be translat-
ed before any disposition can be
made of them.
After being deciphered, many
of the letters have turned out
to be appeals to University of-
ficials for financial andl other
aid from people the officials
have never heard of.
Miss Leonard related that the
average volume of such mail is!
10 to 20 letters a day, with the
load heaviest at Christmas and

at the beginning of the semester.
The staff has become expert at
tracing down students with only
the barest of clues to work with,
so most of the mail is finally de-
livered.
Student Affairs clerks are gear-
ed to expect anything in the day's
mail. There is one letter that ar-
rives monthly that stumps every-
one: a warning to the dean's of-
fice of "dire things to come." It
is post-marked New York and
signed "The Vigilantes."
One Act Plays
To End Today
The season's second bill of one
act plays will receive its second
and last performance at 8 p.m.
today on the stage of the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
Sale of the remaining tickets
will go on from 10 a.m. to curtain
time at the Mendelssohn box of-
fice. They are 30 cents apiece.
The four plays on the bill are
"The Woods Are Still," by Dan
Waldron, '51, "Boke's Friends,"
by Shelton Murphy, '51, "Aria
Da Capo," by Edna St. Vincent
Millay and "Wurzel-Flummery,"
by A. A. Milne.

'U' Professors
Hit Proposed
Sales Tax Plan
Economics professors concur-
red yesterday that the $10 billion
federal sales tax suggested by
various senators was out of the
question for a number ofureasons.
Prof. J. Phillip Wernette of
the business administration
school pointed out that to collect
a sum as large as $10 billion by
means of a sales tax would in-
volve a levy of at least 10% on
each purchase. This is a huge cut
to take out of retail sales, he said.
PROF. WERNETTE, agreeing
that the defense effort must be
paid for in taxes or inflation, felt
however that there would be bet-
ter ways of collecting the money.
Personal income taxes could be
raised, as could corporation and
excise taxes, he declared.
Prof. Richard Musgrave of
the economics department em-
phasized that such a tax would
discriminate against lowest in-
come groups. "Although taxes
on the lower and middle, as
well as higher income groups
must be raised to cut down the
inflationary pressures caused
by high consumer demand,
these taxes must strive for
equity."

U' Chess Team Places Fifth
In Intercollegiate Tournament

U

r

i1

While the eyes of all loyal Wol-I
verine rooters were focused ont
the Pasadena pageant, the un-1
heralded University chess team1
was at the other end of the
country quietly giving an excel-t
lent account of themselves at fant
intercollegiate chess tournament7
in New York.
The four-man squad, compos-
ed of Mark Eucher, '53, Tom
Straus, '52, Steve Smale, '52, and
Russ Church, '52, wound up fifth
in a field of 16. This was actu-
ally a better showing than it
would appear, for Michigan is
usually considered a small-time
power in the chess world.1
METROPOLITAN New York, a
traditional c h ess stronghold,
swept the meet. Columbia finished
on top, while CCNY, Notre Dame
of the chess board, was a close sec-
ond and NYU placed fourth. A
suntanned Miami crew slipped
into third.
Michigan had a record for
the meet of 4 wins, 2 losses, and
a draw with champion Colum-
bia.
ALTHOUGH THE squad could-
n't match the laurels won by the

more publicized football team,
they didn't come away empty-
handed. Michigan, the East's re-
presentative in the Tournament
of Roses, was presented with the
prize for being the Westernmost
team in, the Tournament of
Knights, Kings, and Queens.
The prize was a chess book
written in Spanish for each
member of the team. The choice
of language baffled the play-
ers, who felt that the New
Yorkers might have thought
that Michigan was a foreign
country.
The team made the New York
trip on their own, with no fan-
fare, no Wolverine Specials, and
no University funds.
Philosopher Will
Talk on 'Thinking
Prof. Gilbert Ryle, of the philo-
sophy department at Magdalen
College, University of Oxford, will
give a. lecture, "Thinking," at 8
p.m. today in Rm. 1025 Angell
Hall.
The lecture is sponsored by the
philosophy department.

HE SUGGESTED instead that
an expenditure tax be used. Such
a levy was suggested by the Ad-
ministration in 1942, but received
little consideration from Congress.
This tax would be based on the
total spending by the family unit
for a certain period. Thus people
would be encouraged to save, as
savings would not be touched by
this tax. Also, it would hit direct-
ly the source of the inflation,
consumer spending, he asserted.

0

- I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

evening program: "Crafts and
Customs Around the World."
Film: "Here is the Gold Coast,"
7:30 p.m., Kellogg Auditorium.
Exhibition halls in the Museums

(Continued from Page 5)
C minor (First Movement) by
Williams, Morceau Symphonique
by Guilmant, Gould's Rhapsody
Jericho; the Finale "The Pines of
Rome" by Respighi, and Scenario
from "South Pacific," by Rodgers.
Open to the public without
charge.

Michigan Christian Fellowship:
Meet at Lane Hall to go to the
hockey game. Also Open House
upstairs at Lane Hall.
Canterbury Club: 4-6 p.m., Tea
and Open House.
Wesleyan Foundation: Informal
Open House at the Guild. Square
and Social Dancing.

building hold many illustrations
of crafts and customs of strange
peoples, from the Eskimos to the
Polynesians. These exhibits are
lighted and open to the public
from 7-9 p.m., Friday.
Coming Events
Graduate Mixer: Sat., Jan. 13,
8:30-12 midnight, Rackham As-
sembly Hall. Dancing and cards
available. All graduate students
are invited.

Have you bought
your 1951 Ensian,
"The Rose Bowl
Special"?
BUY NOW!
$5.DO
'iiI February 28

i

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A MAJOR MUSICAL EVENT
PRADES BACH FESTIVAL
PABLO CASALS
DIRECTOR
TEN MAGNIFICENT LONG-PLAYING
RECORDS AVAILABLE INDIVIDUALLY
ON
COLUMBIA RECORtDS
1. BRANDENBURG CONCERTOS NOS. 1, 2 and 3
Soloists and Orchestra under Casals
ML 4345.................. ........... ........ ............ $5.45
2. BRANDENBURG CONCERTOS NOS. 4 and 5
Szigeti, Istomin, Wummer, etc.
ML 4346............. . ...*.......... $5.45
3. BRANDENBURG CONCERTO NO. 6
MUSICAL OFFERING (EXCERPTS)
ML 4347............... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . ............$5.45
4. SUITE NO. 1 FOR ORCHESTRA
SUITE NO. 2 FOR FLUTE AND ORCHESTRA
-L 4348--.........................-.- - ..........* ... .$5.45
5. SONATAS NO. 1 and 2 FOR CELLO AND PIANO
Casals, Cello and Baumgartner, Piano
ML 4349........................................... .$5.45
6. SONATA NO. 3 FOR CELLO AND PIANO
CHROMATIC FANTASY AND FUGUE; ITALIAN CONCERTO
ML 4350.....................................x.........$5.45
7. CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND OBOE
Stern, Violin and Tabuteau, Oboe with Orchestra
CONCERTO FOR TWO VIOLINS
Stern and Schneider, Violins with Orchestra
ML 4351......................$5.45
8. CONCERTO FOR PIANO, VIOLIN AND FLUTE
Horszowski, Schneider, Wummer with Orchestra
CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN IN D MINOR
Szigeti with Orchestra
ML 4352...........................e...................$5.45
9. CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN IN A MINOR
TOCCATA AND FUGUE IN E MINOR
CONCERTO FOR PIANO IN F MINOR
TRIO SONATA FOR VIOLIN, PIANO AND FLUTE
ML 4353...............................................$5.45
10. ENGLISH SUITE; SONATA FOR FLUTE AND PIANO
PRELUDE AND FUGUE IN E MINOR
ML 4354.......................,......... ...............$5.5
Every record in this memorable series is a gem. We particularly recommend
Nos. 5 and 6 (the cello sonatas by Casals) as a "must"
in the library of every collector.
HEAR THEM AT THE

,t .,

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Student Recital: Joyce 'Heeney Hillel: Services, 7:45 p.m., Lane
Beglarian, Organist, will play a
program at 8:30 Sunday evening, Hall. Saturday morning services,m.
Jan. 14, in Hill Auditorium, in 9:0a
partial fulfillment of the require- Ht M n w bet I-M
ments for the Bachelor of Music Hostel Meetings wil be at -fh
degree. A pupil of Marilyn Mason vr oth rid(hursteadfmeeting
Brown, Mrs. Beglarian has chosen until Spring Semester. Be at Lea-
works by Sweelinck, Bach, Ef- gue at 7:30 to wak to I-M Bldg-
finger, Messiaen, and Alain, for for sports and swimming. New
itedprogram. The pubc is in- members welcome.
Hawaii Club: Business meeting,
Events Today Room 3B, Union. 7:30 p.m. Elec-
Today tion of officers for the spring.

11

Nort...

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SAVINGS
INSURED TO
by Federal Savings and
Loan Insurance Corpora-
tion. Open an account
with any amount. Earn
2% current rate.

Roger Williams Guild: Open i
House, 8:30-12 midnight. M

University Museums

Friday

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FRIDAY NIGHT DANCES
Join the fun from 9 to 1
Sleepy Head Ted's Record Dance

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ANON." Am

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