100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 11, 1951 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-01-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Til

..

GRO UNDKEEPER'S BATTLE:

Trailbreakers Trample Campus

, # *

* * *

S * *

Positions
Plentiful in
Techno logy
Job openings in the technical
fields are so plentiful that one
company is planning to create a
recruiting department for women.
This statement was made by
Mildred Webber, assistant to the
director of the Bureau of Ap-
pointments in charge of general
placement, who asserted that "em-
ployment possibilities are better
than ever."
ACCORDING TO Miss Webber,
government agencies as well as
private companies are increasing
their tempo in tracking down
prospective employes.
Emphasis is being put on the
technical and research phases, she
said.
Except for an increase in the
demand for stenographers, op-
portunities in non - technical
fields havenot shown any ma-.
jor changes.
Miss Webber attributes part of
the brighter job outlook to the
fact that some government units
are now authorized to recruit at
all levels whereas before they were
restricted to PhD's only.
"Also," she said, "there are few-
er graduates this year than last,
companies have been expanding
and the draft is beginning to cut
into the manpower supply."

STUDENT WORKS FEATURED:
Bill of One Act Pla ys WillOpen Today

Life in Michigan of the 1870's
and in San Francisco of today, as
interpreted by two University stu-
dents, will be the subject of two of
the plays on the season's second
bill of one act plays.
The program will open "at 8
p.m. today in the Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre. The two student
written plays are "The Woods Are
Still," by Dan Waldron, '51, and
"Boke's Friends," by Shelton Mur-
phy, '51. "Wurzel-Flummery," by
A. A. Milne and "Aria Da Capo,"
by Edna St. Vincent Millay will
complete the program.
The dramas will receive a sec-
ond performance tomorrow. The
theatre box office will open at
10 a.m. and remain open until
curtain time both today and to-
morrow. Tickets are 30 cents
apiece.
"BORE'S FRIENDS" is the
story of an San Francisco sioe-
shine boy's attempts to gain com-
panionship and the troubles his
quest gets him into. It will be di-
rected by Margaret Paton, 'Grad.
Waldron will direct his own
play, which is set in the central
Michigan woods during the last
century. It tells of a period, Wal-
dron explained, "when civiliza-
tion was coming north and more
than trees were being hewn
down. People were also getting
bruised in the process."
A. A. Milne's whimsical come-
dy "Wurzel-Flummery" is about a
member of parliament, a sudden
inheritance and the name W. F.
Romance. It all adds up, accord-
ing to a spokesman for speech de-
p5artment, to a hilarious play. It
will be directed by Roslyn Men-
dell, 'Grad.
"Aria Da Capo" by Edna St.
Vincent Millay will be performed
by an all-female cast. Since its
first production in the early '50's,
this fantasy with tragic implica-
tions has taken its place has one
of the classic one act plays. It
will be directed by Willard Booth,
Grad.

I

.I

DIRECTOR CALLS THE PLAY-Dan Waldron (right), author
and director of' "The Woods Are Still," tells Patricia Skinner how
to cradle a violin as Warren Bunyan registers the proper wonder.
The scene is from one of four plays which will be given today
and tomorrow on the season's second bill of one act plays.
Prof. Dickinson Recommends
Simplified Personal Budgets

--Daily-Burt Sapowitch
GROUNDKEEPER'S DILEMMA-Coeds trampling feet wear bare a path circling around the League,
while groundkeeper Sam Wiley frowns. The coeds, Janie Topper '51 (left) and Deora Nelson '51
demonstrate the methods of campus trailbreakers as they march through a seeded area and pre-
pare to cross through a hedge onto the sidewalk.

SCOTS SEEK SELF-GOVERNMENT:
Professor Tells Scone Stone History

By HARLAND BRITZ
If the Scots are guilty of run-
ning off with the Stone of Scone,
the act is an outward manifesta-
tion of the agitation for Scottish
self - government, according to
Prof. William Leslie of the his-
tory department.
Though they currently have lo-
cal self-government and are rep-
resented in the British parliament,

they are very desirous of having
a national parliament of their
own, he explained.
* * *
HOWEVER, Prof. Leslie said
that since the present British king
is a descendant of a onetime Scot-
tish king, who became England's
James I, and the present British
queen is a Scotswoman, perhaps
the British claim to the stone is

Noted Humorist Bennett Cerf
Will Lecture Here Tuesday

more than just one of possession.
The Stone of Scone incident
is not the first recent evidence
of Scottish nationalism. Histor-
ical documents that were wres-
ted from the Scots in 1291, the
same time that the British cap-
tured the Stone, were only re-
cently returned to Scotland. Ag-
itation had caused Parliament to
decide to return them in 1937
but the government just got
around to acting ontheir recom-
mendation.
Prof. Leslie feels that only time
will tell the whereabouts of the
historical relic. He hinted that
perhaps the police know more
about it than the news they have
released implies.
He also said that the incident
has little real importance in a
political sense, but that it never-
theless is very interesting.
* * *
THE STONE was stolen on
Christmas day from its 655 year
resti g place in Westminster Ab-
bey. he 336 lb. rectangle of yellow
sandstone was seized by Edward
I during an invasion of Scotland
and was installed in the abbey in
1296.

Ensian Sales
To Open Again
With a complete coverage of the
Rose Bowl added to the 'Ensian,
sales will open again for the '51
issue.
The book, priced at $5 now, will
go to $6 Feb. 28, according to
Publicity Manager Joe Heinlein,
'53.
Book subscriptions are obtain-
able in the 'Ensian office, at regis-
tration or from the various house
and dormitory representatives.
"Also," Heinlein warned, "groups
must have paid for their picture
b, Monday in order to obtain the
$10 discount."
Pictures of the Rose Bowl game
and festivities taken by the 'En-
sian will be on display in the win-
dow of a local barber shop soon.
A-Bomb Movies
To Be RunToday
Dean Ralph A. Sawyer of the
graduate School will 'speak and
show color movies on the Bikini
atomic bomb tests at 7:30 pan.
today in Rm. 1400, Chemistry
Bldg.
The program is sponsored by
the Student Science Society. All
interested persons are invited to
attend, according to Dave Shap-
pirio, '51, society president.

If you're trying to account for
every penny in your household or
personal budget, you're on the
wrong track, according to Prof. Z.
Clark Dickinson of*'the economics
department.
A BUDGET should be a plan
rather than a strait-jacket,pthe
economist asserted. "No great
weight should be given the guides
which list percentages to be spent
for food, clothing, rents, and other
specific items, as these may have
no application in your individual
situation."
Prof. Dickinson suggested
three kinds of records to make
budgeting simple but complete
enough to see where your money
is going and to know Just where
you stand.

Bennett Cerf, a campus comic
who made his humor pay off will
give the fifth in this year's lec-
ture series at 8:30 p.m. Tuesday
in Hill Auditorium.
In his undergraduate days at
Columbia, Cerf, now head of one
of the nation's largest publishing
houses, served as the editor of
"The Jester," Columbia counter-
part of the Gargoyle.
THIS POST, was good back-
ground for Cerf, who of late years
has become the nation's top joke
Adams' Funeral
Services Held
Services for Randolph G Ad-
ams, former director of the Cle-
ments Library who died in the
University Hospital on Jan. 4,
were held at 4:30 p.m. yesterday
at the St. Andrews Episcopal
Church.
Adams will be buried Saturday
at the Laural Hill Cemetery near
Philadelphia, Pa.
Members of a faculty organi-
zation called Catholeps are serv-
ing as honorary pall-bearers.
'U' Composer Dies
Roy D. Welch, chairman of the
music department at Princeton
University and author 'of the mu-
sic for the first two Union Operas
died Monday at Princeton, N. J.
Prof. Welch was an instructor
here at the University from 1907
to 1914. His best known Union
Opera song probably is "When
Night Falls, Dear." He was 65
years old.

These are: (1) a budget to fore-",-
cast income and outlay forra
period of time-preferably on a
monthly basis, (2) a receipts and
expenditure statement of thedac-
tual financial transactions dur-
ing the budget period, (3) peri-
odic balance sheets, which act as,
"snapshots" of the fai nily's net
worth.
Bowl Trip Refunds
Students who did not use por-
tions of their Wolverine Club
Rose Bowl trip ticket may obtain
refunds from 1 to 4:30 p.m. to-
day and tomorrow at the Admin-
istration Bldg., according to Cor-
ky Gibbon, Wolverine Club mem-
ber.

anthologist. To his credit he has
such bestsellers as "Shake Well
Before Using" and "Try and Stop
Me."
But all was not laughter for
Cerf at Columbia. While earn-
ing a degree in the School of
Journalism, he was also elected
to membership in Phi Beta
Kappa.
After graduation the perpipa-
tetic key-bearer became a reporter
on the New York Herald Tribune
and a clerk on the stock exchange,
at the same time.
. Soon, however, he turned to
publishing and helped found the
company which he now heads. At
the present time,,besides publish-
ing and compiling books, Cerf
finds time to write columns for a
national syndicate and a weekly
literary magazine.
Tickets for his lecture will go
on sale Monday in the Hill Audi-
torium box office, at $1.50, $1.20
and 60 cents.
The box office will be open from
10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 p.m. to
5 p.m. on- Monday. On Tuesday
the hours will be the same except
the box office will remain open
until lecture time.
Loan Prints Due
The Student-Loan Print Office
has announced that all pictures
rented by students at the begin-
ning of the semester, must be re-
turned by Jan. 20 to Rm. 510 in
the basement of the Administra-
tion Bldg.

T
t/9
J
-J
F-
-J
Va-

PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S * PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S *
Prices Effective Thursdo,
ROY REID Friday, Saturday
Proprietor We Reserve the Right To Limit
// M rnr--GSIQuantities.

i

Breaker Ball Operations Cause
TremorsThrough Angell Hall
Students stiffened in their seats the origin of the tremors ran
yesterday astremors induced by from minor earthquakes to near-
nearby construction operations by bombing raids.
ran through Angell Hall. However Leonard A. Perry, pro-
The shocks began at 10:40 a.m. ject manager of the construction
and continued at five-second in- work, offered a more factual and
tervals for fifteen minutes send- less terrifying explanation:
ing jarring vibrations through the "This land is sandy gravel and
building and rattling fluorescent transmits the shocks just as if
fixtures and window panes, it were on springs," Perry said.
* * And Howard R. Hansen, director
SOURCE OF THE shocks: the of the breaker's operations, was
operation of a 4400 pound breaker quick to point out that there was
ball apparatus, engaged in loosen- no danger of dislodging anything
ing earth and old concrete near in nearby buildings.
the partially-exposed foundation "We even dynamited near the
of Angell Hall. same place during the vacation
But student conjectures as to and Angell Hall was barely shaken.

Cigarettes
POPULAR BRANDS
Carton
S75
Plus Tax

RUBBING'
ALCOHOL
PINT

FABULOUS
FAB
SOAP FLAKES

0

25c
Val.

9c

Large
Size

27c

LIMIT ONE

75c Val.
MOLLE
SHAVE CREAM

Cleansing
Tissues
Box of 300
c

Three
25c
Tubes

49f

WHISK
BROOM.
MAGNETIC BROOM
Whisks Dirt, Lint Away
Like Magic
39C
Palmolive

I-A
I
-
I
s
r
d I
m
CA
'0
Iv
I-
*
r-
mn
rf
r
'0

i
41

, . "

PIPES
WIMBERLEY
Reg. 2.50
$129

GLOVES
$2.00 value
All Wool for
Dress or Driving
93 C

BAR SOAP

t.

Reg. l0c

j~c
3 for19

;+ss

4atiky

SPECIAL
Aquamarine
LOTION & SOAP

f

SPECIAL
Listerine
Two 45c Tubes
TOOTH PASTE
59C

SPECIAL
DOUBLE

Danderine

Two 35c Bottles

Call 2-4477
VETERANS

e

Music by
Frank Tinker and His Orchestra
11 t% r% 1,A

47
SHAMPOO

CAMPUS-VARSITY

INHISTON

Wrisleys
WATFR

I

I

11111

114-

I

.I

I

li

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan