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January 09, 1951 - Image 12

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-01-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

VO EASY TIME FOR 'M':
Illini Scouts Call California Tough'

olverines Trample Dartmouth, 27-7;

By BOB ROSENMAN
"Michigan is not going to have
an easy time ,against California
in the Rose Bowl New Year's Day."
This, in essence, is the opinion
of two University of Illinois scouts
who got a good look at Lynn Wal-
dorf's Pacific Coast Conference
di mpions.
THIESE GENTLEMEN, Chuck
Purvis and Mel Brewer, bothlook-
ed on as underdog Stanford tied
the Bears, 7-7.

Brewer also watched a fine
University of Washington team
blow their chances for a Rose
Bowl sojourn with a fumble on
Cal's 4-yard line which eventu-
ally helped bring the Bears a
narrow 14-7 triumph.
Purvis and Brewer also got an
opportunity to watch the Wolver-
ines in action and both agree that
Chuck Ortmann is a fine passer.
But from their reports, Michigan's
star tailback will have plenty of

Good Luck
WOLVERINES
in your Return Visitp
to the Rose Bowl
.. p
c
Q 1 p
S00 EAST LIBERTY TELEPHONE 3-8781 o
C Yey<) .. U 'lUmt0OsO-OL)OUOm

trouble hitting the mark against
California.
STANFORD AND Washington
admittedly had a degree of suc-
cess through the airways against
the Bears, and they had two pretty
fair passers named Gary Kerkor-
ian and Don Heinrich, respective-
ly.
Because of this- evidence,
many Wolverine enthusiasts will
jump to the hasty conclusion
that "if Stanfordand Washing-
ton passed against California so
easily, just think of what will
happen when Ortmann starts
throwing"
But Brewer, who revealed that
he never expected his Illini to miss
the Pasadena trip, holds a con-
trary view. "UCLA has a better
passing attack than Stanford,"
he declared, "and they couldn't
do anything.
"THE DIFFERENCE was that
CarlVan Heitt, Waldorf's safety
man, was out of the Stanford
game with injuries. He's the best
safety man I saw all season."
(Brewer also looked over Ohio
State before the Buckeyes met
Illinois, and kept a wary eye on
the Ohioan's safety man, a fel-
low by the name'of Vic Jano-
wicz, and a pretty fair defensive
ballplayer in his own right, not
to mention offense.)
After 'Purvis and Brewer had
spent a total of twelve hours with
Bennie Oosterbaan and his staff
early in December, there was evi-
dence on the faces of Michigan's
coaches that their words had made
a deep impression.
"CALIFORNIA is a hard-going
team that is easily the best the
Big Ten has faced in the Rose
Bowl," asserted Brewer. Even Wal-
dorf chimes in with the remark
that "this is the best team I've
ever had at California."
That includes a 1948 squad
boasting such stellar perform-
ers as Jackie Jensen, Bob Cel-
eri, Jack Swaner, and Rod Franz,
and a 1949 aggregation with
backfield talent including Billy
Montagne, Frank Brunk, Billy
Main, and many others, both of
whom rolled through regular
season play without a loss or
tie.
Getting back to the scouts' re-
ports, Brewer had this to say about
Cal's running power: "I don't
think our Conference had a run-
ning team to match it. We had
good running at Illinois, but not
the slashing, bruising kind that
California has shown."
* * *
THAT'S SOME admission from
an Illinois man who's team boast-
ed such fine ball carriers as John-
ny Karras, Dick Raklovits, Don
Stevens, and Ronnie Clark!

E

Ground
Indians Falter
Before Strong
PassingGame
Ortmann-to-Perry
Duo Provides Punch
By BOB SANDELL
Michigan's gridiron machine be-
gan rolling in high gear yesterday
afternoon, using a long range
ground and aerial attack to whip
the Dartmouth Indians, 27-7.
Seventy-four thousand, nine
hundred and three fans in the
Michigan Stadium saw the scrappy
Indians grab an early 7-0 lead in
the first period and then succumb
to a relentless Wolverine attack
that threatened to turn the contest
into a rout in the final stanza.
* * *
A SLIM WOLVERINE sopho-
more, Lowell Perry, stole the show
from everybody with three great
interceptions of passes by the tal-
ented Johnny Clayton. For good
measure he took a Bill Putich pass
for a touchdown in the second
quarter.
The Wolverines hit pay dirt on
two pass plays that covered 47
yards and two more on running
efforts that went for 34 and 3
yards. Harry Allis was on the
receiving end of one of the pay-
dirt heaves with halfback Leo
Koceski and reserve fullback
Ralph Straffon tallying the other
two.
The Easterners were far from
a pushover, though. Clayton was
every bit the threat he was ex-
pected to be and fullback Bill Rob-
erts did a tremendous job of bulling
his way through the Michigan line
until he was injured in the second
quarter. His loss and an injury
to Charlie Curtis early in the game
were both costly to Tugg McLaug-
hry's Big Green.
* * *
DARTMOUTH'S LONE score
came early in the first per-
iod. Michigan kicked off and
after t h r e e punt exchanges,
the Indians r e c o v e r e d a fum-
ble in the Wolverine backfield
on the 22. Roberts carried the pig-
skin down to the 11 and then Clay-
ton found end John McDonald in
the end zone with a perfect pitch.
McDonald was covered by two men
and made a leaping catch of the
ball. Charlie Dey kicked the extra
point to make it 7-0 for the In-
dians.
On the kickoff the Maize and
Blue started from their own 36
and eight play's later Koceski
raced around left end on a re-
verse to go : over standing up.
The play started from the 34
with the fleet Wolverine right

-Daily-Carlyle Marshall

Attack

DARTMOUTH'S JOHN CLAYTON MOMENTARILY ELUDES 'M'S' DICK McWIL'LIAMS
** *

Trips

Badgers, 26-13

CONGRATULATIONS
and

IF

BEST WISHES

to the

half simply outrunning the slow-
er Dartmouth defense. Allis' kick
was wide.
Perry grabbed a Clayton passon
the Michigan 21 to halt the next
drive by the visitors. Dartmouth
had penetrated deep into Wolver-
ine territory, mostly on the
strength of a long pass from Clay-
ton to Bob Tyler, the Indian left
halfback.
THE WOLVERINES then mess-
ed up two great scoring chances
when two of Putich's passes were
dropped with practically a clear
field in front of the receivers.
Halfway through the second
period Dartmouth started mov-
ing again. With Clayton and
Roberts leading the way they
drove down to the Michigan 30
before Perry again thwarted the
Indian advance with an inter-
ception on the five.
Michigan couldn't get anywhere,
though, and Koceski booted to the
Dartmouth 45. After three plays
failed for the Indians, Michigan
got its big break of the game. Bob
McCraney's punt skidded off the
edge of his foot and traveled for
a net gain of one yard to the 47.
' * *

Capable Coaching Staff Backed
Wolverines' 50 Grid Success

1950 WESTERN CONFERENCE

CHAMPS

v
A football coach's fortunes are
known to sway back and forth ac-
cording to victories his team ac-1
complishes and the defeats it ab-
sorbs.
Michigan's Bennie Oosterbaanj
had to weather plenty of abusei
during the season's early stages
as his Wolverine machine ground
to an awkward halt against Michi-
gan State, Army, Illinois and Min-
nesota.
WHEN HIS BOYS delivered a'
third consecutive Western Confer-
ence crown to the genial mentor's.
doorstep, all the storm clouds were1
swept away and Bennie silentlyt
and graciously accepted the usual
plaudits.
Oosterbaan himself carries a
brilliant record as a player at
Michigan. He was an All-Ameri-
can end in 1925-26-27 and re-
ceived similar acclaim in basket-
ball as a senior.
The job he did in his first year
as head coach earned him the dis-
tinction of Coach of the Year.
That came as a result of an unde-
feated and untied season in which
Chuck Ortmann and Leo Koceski
emerged as sophomore stars.
* * *
OOSTERBAAN is surrounded
with an able group of assistants.

ERNIE MCCOY, who is currently
embroiled. in a basketball cam-
paign as Michigan hardwood
coach, was chief scout for the
gridiron team. He failed to secure
necessary data on California dur-
ing the season since a possible
Wolverine Rose Bowl appearance
was so remote.
His work was done by Illinois'
scouts who were quite confident
that the Illini were headed for
Pasadena: Their reports were la-
ter made available to Ooster-
baan.i
Dominic Tomasi and D i c k
Kempthorn are making their sec-
ond trip to California in three
years,
1

Homecoming
Crowd Sees
Ortmann Star
Belated Wisconsin
Bid Falls Far Short
By BOB SANDELL
The passing and running bril-
liance of the great Charlie Ort-
mann and a bounce-back gang of
Michigan Wolverines made it a
happy Homecoming Day in the
Michigan Stadium yesterday with
a convincing 26-13 conquest of
the Wisconsin Badgers.
With the talented blonde half-
back putting on a sensational first
half show for the 91,202 fans, the
Wolverines completely dominated
the Badgers for three periods in
taking their first big step in de-
fense of their Conference crown.
ONLY TWO LATE scores in the
fourth period against the Wolver-
ine reserves marred an otherwise
completely one-sided affair for
the revitalized Maize and Blue.
Ortmann had one of the
greatest days of his collegiate
career although he retired early
in the third quarter with a slight
leg injury. He rambled 14 yards
f or the first Wolverine marker
and then heaved a long pass to
Bill Putich for another.
In all he accounted for 185 yards
on the ground and through the
air. In the first half alone he com-
pleted 10 of 14 passes for an amaz-
ing percentage against the sup-
posedly defensively alert Badgers.
THE MICHIGAN defensive pla-
toon, led by Roger Zatkoff, Tony
Momsen, and Tom Johnson com-
pletely throttled every Badger of-
fensive attempt until the Maize
and Blue had piled up a 26-0
lead.
The Wolverines made it a sad
return for Ivy Williamson and
must have left him wondering
if they had heard of the word
"letdown."
Hard hitting Don Dufek had
another good day as he personally
accounted for the third and the
fourth Michigan tallies on plunges
from the three and one. He rolled
for 74 yards through the stunned
Badger defenders, averaging near-
ly four yards a play.
* * *
ENDS LOWELL Perry and Fred
Pickard and quarterback Bill Pu-
tich each caught three of Ort-
mann's accurate tosses. Putich
scored the second touchdown on
a brilliantly executed pass play
that covered 28 yards.
Michigan jumped into a 7-0
lead just before the period end-
ed. The other first period Wol-
verine touchdown was a re-
sult of superb ball-handling and
a fine Ortmann-Putich pass.
The bal came back to Dufek.
He handed it to Putich who in
turn pitched out to Ortmann who
ran wide to his right. The blonde
flash sped toward the sidelines,
paused, then threw across field to
Putich who was waiting alone with
open arms in the end zone.
Michigan's third marker climax-
ed the first drive of the second
half, Dufek crashing over from the
one. Minutes later Dufek ended
Michigan's scoring with a two-
yard plunge.
The Badgers came to life late
in the final period. With two min-
utes left, John Coatta flipped a
pass to Bob Manfield in the end
zone. After recovering an "M"
fumble on the 25, they scored
again with seconds remaining.
WIsC. MIC.
First Downs ii 1
Rushing Yardage 15 4
Passing Yardage 1:7

Passes Intercepted -
Punting Average 41.3 4i ,'
Puntsi+ 4
Fumbles Lost 1 1
Yards Penalized 5 49

,, I

FOLLKTT'

MICHIGAN BOOKSTORE
State Street at North University

MI

First Downs

I

Yards Rushing7
Yards Forwards ]
Forwards Attempted
Forwards Completed
Forwards
Intercepted By
Punts, number
Punts, average distance
Fumbles, balls lost
Yards Penalized

CH. DART.
12 15
168 148
178 127
19 30
8 9

5
7
32.6
5
9

0
9
29.2
0
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authority of the Board in Control of
Student Publications.
ROSE BOWL EXTRA
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wish Michigan Good

Luck

Col9~a ta/ ta, h4

at the Rose Bowl

to the

UNIVERSITY FOOTBALL TEAM
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