100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 09, 1951 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-01-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


ROSE BOWL
EXTRA

4ft

Dattp

ROSE BOWL
EXTRA

Latest Deadline in the State
VOL. LXI, No. 76 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN TUESDAY, JANUARY 9, 1951

EIGHT PAGES

i1

*7

*

*

*

* *

*

* *

Bennie, Players Celebrate Con quest

Sportswriters, Fans Invade
Michigan Dressing Rooms

* * * *

# * * «

Wolverines Bowl
Kings ,Again, 1-
By BILL CONNOLLY
Special to The Daily
PASADENA, Calif.--Michigan's die-hard gridiron greats earned
13 first-downs and 14 points in the second half of the 1951 Rose Bowl
game to hand the Big Ten its fifth successive victory and the Paci-
fic Coast Conference its sixth straight loss in the classic contest, by
beating California, 14-6, last New Year's day.
Contrary to its expectations, a nerve-shattered crowd of over
100,000 saw the Golden Bears pounded into submission by the Wol-
verine defenders' vicious tackling, Don Dufek's devastating running--
which netted the two TD's-and Chuck Ortmann's accurate aerial
attack.
Dufek, who carried the ball 23 times from scrimmage-better
than half of his team's running plays-netted 113 yards, for almost
a five-yard average.

By BOB SANDELL
Associate Sports Editor
PASADENA, Cal. - Even the
wildest New Year's celebration
wouldn't compare with the din of
the Michigan dressing room just
after the Wolverines had staged
one of the most amazing come-
backs of all times in the 37th an-
nual Rose Bowl classic.
Hordes of reporters, photogra-
phers, and well-wishers jammed
the tiny room to congratulate
Bennie Oosterbaan and his coura-
geous Blue-shirted gridders. The
bedlam after the Ohio State game
was nothing compared to this.
* * *
OOSTERBAAN was herded off
into a separate room to meet the
newspapermen. As after the Ohio
game, however, Bennie appeared
calm and would merely say that
he was "as happy as a man could
be and was proud of his boys."
The greatest thrill of his life?
"No," was his answer, "I have
had quite a few of them in my
day."
He said Don Dufek had played
as good a game as he has' ever
seen a fullback play, and that the
team turned in its best game of
the season.
* * *
THE REPORTERS wanted to
know what happened at half time,
and what had caused the Wolver-
Ines to explode in the final 30
minutes. Bennie replied by say-
Ing that the "boys fired them-
selves. Several of them talked a
little, including Al Wahl."
He praised the California
team as a hard-driving, well-
coached outfit and had a lot of
praise for the trio of California
backs that made things miser.
able for the visitors in the first
half.
Somebody asked him about the
California touchdown play that
might have made Dufek a goat.
Said Bennie, "Don runs better
forward than backwards."
* * *
DUFEK, however, emerged the
star of the contest. He was voted
the most valuable by the West
Coast writers.
All of the Wolverines had
praise for the Bear backfield
and compared them favorably
with those of Illinois and Army.
Some thought they were thej
best they had faced all year.t
Ozzie Clark had this to say for
the Los Angeles Herald and Ex-
press: "California was a substan-
tial team but on occasions they1
committed defensive mistakes1
which we deftly converted intoi
scoring opportunities." The papert

promptly labeled Ozzie as the
clown of the squad.
* .~,*,^
DUFEK and Ortmann got the
big headlines, but as always there<
were the unsung heroes. Tom '
Johnson played another whale of
a gme ndwas prominent on
many key tackles. Another lne- -. -.: :;
man, Pete Kinyon, came in for .
son. from a teammate, Al Jack- >N < . 4'
Jackson claims Kinyon was .. .. . .>.,.}}
largely responsible for the huge
holes that Dufek repeatedly .
found in the right side of the ,;,:
line. "He was knocking All- :.:'
American Les Richter all over :;::..
the place," Al adds. Jackson's.
own role in the victory, howevr, ,?.
was nothing to be sneezed at. '<:"
The age old screen pass and a
slick defense played a big role in 'N"\<;,t.
the victory. When the Wolverines ,.
had to make yardage, the Ort- . -> . .
mann to Dufek heave always \f-
worked and that included a vitalf
third and seven play on the first
touchdown march.
Michigan used a tight 6-2-2-1\
most of the time, but shifted *' +.
along the line after Cal came out
of the huddle. They were fooled a N
few times in the first half, but
the Wolverines learned from their -courtesy The Los Angeles Times
mistakes and improved. The Bears-
didn't. MICHIGAN FULLBACK DON DUFEK (30) HITS CAL GOAL-LINE TO KNOT THE SCORE 6-ALL IN THE 1951 ROSE BOWL GAME

{

112 TO 6!
Michigan Makes It Three for Three

Rose Bowl Champs
OFFENSE

ORTMANN'S PASSING was
equally brilliant.
He set up the Michigan
touch-downs by completing 15
of 19 passes, 13 of the comple-
tions coming in the Michigan-
dominated second half.
The Wolverine wingback's
passes were rifled into the hands
of ends Lowell Perry, Harry Allis
and Fred Pickard, quarterback
Bill Putich and the dependable
Dufek, to rattle the California
defense which yielded 146 yards
to Ortmann's right arm.
* * *
A TALLY of first downs tells
the story.
In the first half, it was Cali-
fornia-10, Michigan two. But in
that period, the Wolverines ran
only 11 plays from scrimmage,
and were in possession of the ball
for little more than five of the
thirty minutes.
* * *
ALL OF THIS ran completely
in reverse of the experts' pre-
game predictions; for it was writ-
ten that Michigan's only hopes
for victory rested on an early
game offensive spree, California's
reserve strength being expected
to tell the tale in the last quarter.
It was late in the second
quarter, however, that the
Golden Bears began to tarnish,
when the brutal tackling of
the Wolverines, sparked by Al
Wahl and Tom Johnson, began
to weaken the power of the ef-
fective Cal running attack.
The three Bears heretofore
known as the "Terrible Trio"-
Johnny Olszewski, Jim Monachi-
no and Pete Schabarum-gained
123 yards in' the first half as the
P C C representatives decidedly
outdistanced the Wolverines.
THEY SCORED early in the
second period.
With the Bears in possession
of the ball on the Michigan 39,
following the only interception
of one of Ortmann's 19 passes,
quarterback John Marinos fak-
ed a handoff 4nd dropped back
to pass. He lofted the ball down
to the Michigan 10, into the

hands of end Bob Cummings,
who was tackled in the end
zone by Dufek, putting Cal
ahead, 6-0.
All-American Linebacker Les
Richter's conversion attempt was
wide, ending the afternoon's scor-
ing for the Bears.
* * *
MICHIGAN scored the game-
winning touchdown on an 80.
yard march which began when
the Wolverines took possession of
the ball on their own 20, with
just 12 minutes and 21 seconds
left in the ball game.
Six minutes and six first
downs later, Dufek drove for
four yards on four plays to tie
up the score.
Allis booted home the winning
point with a perfect conversion,
as the public address system re-
ported that 5:30 playing time
remained in the contest.
MICHIGAN--and Dufek again
-put the game on ice later in
the final act when Cal gambled
on a fourth-down pass and- lost
the ball on their own 10-yard
stripe.
The Wolverines' crashing
fullback picked up three yards
through the right side, and
then neatly outraced the flank-
.er on that same side for the
final touchdown of the game.
Allis again booted home the
extra point,

By JIM PARKER
Three Rose Bowl gamesr-Mich-
igan 112, opponents 6!
It's an impressive record that
the Wolverines have posted in the
annual New Year's Day classic,
a record that now includes a vic-
tory in the first game of the Rose
Bowl series, a spectacular triumph
in the most recent Pasadena ex-
travaganza, with another great
win in 1948 sandwiched in be-
tween.
Back in 1902 Fielding H. Yost,
in his first year as coach at Mich-
igan, took a Maize and Blue team
-an iron-man crew twelve strong
-to the innaugural game of what
is now the Rose Bowl post season
classic series. *
THAT 1901 Michigan squad was
a gridiron gollath-a team that
had run roughshod over ten op-
ponents during the season, piling
up an amazing total of 501 points
to its opponents 0!

So it was on New Years Day
1902 that this mighty Wolverine
eleven, playing without the sub-
stitution of its only reserve,
blasted Stanford University's
Indians all over the gridiron
until the Stanford captain ap-
proached Michigan's H. S.'
Weeks in the fourth quarter,
asking that the game be called
off at that point.
Weeks was agreeable and the
yame ended Michigan 49, Stan-
ford 0-and with nine minutes
yet to play in the regulation con-
test.
* * * ,
45 YEARS LATER Michigan
had another great football team.
Fritz Crisler was at the reigns of
the Wolverine 1947 team that had
amazed the football world with a
spectacular offense that had
claimed nine straight victims over
the season and had won the West-

ern Conference title as well as the
right to represent the Big Ten in
'the 34th Rose Bowl game.
Not to be outdone by their
1902 predecessors, the 1947 Wol-
verines- made New Year's Day,
1948, a black one for Southern
California Trojans, dumping the
Californians by the same 49-0
score.
Michigan's "Mad Magicians"
all but rewrote the record book in
that rout of the Trojans' Pacific
Coast Conference Champions, set-
ting nine modern Rose Bowl rec-
ords in the process. The defeat
was the worst that Southern Cal
had suffered in 60 years.
So impressive was the Wolver-
ines' victory that a post season
poll by the Associated Press rated
Michigan the top team ii) the
land, supplanting the poll results
at the end of the regular season
which had placed Notre Dame in
the first position.

PLAYER
Lowell Perry (85)
Al Wahl (72)
Al Jackson (64)
Carl Kreager (56)
Tom Kelsey (65)
John Hess (79)
Fred Pickard (89)
Bill Putich (24)
Leo Koceski (18)
Charles Ortmann (49)
'Don Dufek (30)
PLAYER
Harrly Allis (88)
Tom Johnson (76)
Pete Kinyon (68)
Tony Momsen (59)
Dick McWilliams (69)
Dick Strozewski (62)'
Ozzie Clark (86)
Ted Topor (27)
Don Oldham (14)
Tom Witherspoon (16)
Roger Zatkoff (70)

WI'T.
178
217
195
220
190
195
180
165
165
190
185
WT.
190
205
195
200
248
200
200
215
166
178
208

6-0
6-3
6-0
6-4
6-2
6-2
5-11
5-9
5-10
6-11
5-11

RE
RT
RG
C
LG
LT
LE
QB
RH
LH
FB

Leslie Popp (83)
Robert Timm (67)
Ralph Stribe (75)
John Padjen (58)
Jim Wolter (66)
Bill Ohlenroth (77)
Russ Osterman (80)
Pete Palmer (28)
Wes Bradford (19)
Don Peterson (46)
Russ Rescorla (35)

HT. Pos. PLAYER

WT.
180
185
198
180
190
205
170
190
155
175
180

HT.
6-1
5-11
6-0
5-9
6-0
6-1
5-11
5-11
5-6
5-10
6-0

DEFENSE

HT.
6-0
6-2
6-0
6-2
6-3
6-0
6-1
6-0
5-8
5-11
6-5

Pos.
RE
RT
RG
C
LG
LT
LE
QB
RH
LH
FB

PLAYER
Bud Reeme (82)
B. Bartholomew (73)
Don Dugger (61)
Dick Farrer (55)
John Powers (60)
Ben Pederson (78)
Merritt Green (84)
Jerry Burns (25)
Ralph Straffon (32)
Dave Tinkham (37)
Laurence LeClaire (39)

WT. HT
195 6-2
198 6-3
174 5-10
195 6-0
175 5-11
215 6-2
175 6-0
155 5-8
188 5-8
170 5-10
190 6-0

TEAM STATISTICS:
(first half in
parentheses) MI
Net Yardage from
Rushing (60
145
Yards Gained from
Forward Passes (5
146
Total Net Yardage (65
29.
Number Penalties
Against (
Yards Lost from
Penalties (20
20
Total First Downs . (
15

5)
16
5)
31
2)
I)
?)

(69)
69
(192)
244
(2)
6
(10)
50
(10)
12
4
35.75
2

CH CALIF.
0) (123)
5 175

Number of Punts 2
Average Length of
Punts 32.
Number of Fumbles 2
Number of own
Fumbles Recovered 0

5

0

, w _ ~x x s=. :..: _' i ':'. =, .-m,,..e '°'. ,,_ _ ^ "'. ,._..... u? ' w,>. ,.x,. ,o,. ,: ,. .. , .. fi t ~"" "';'' ,.: a,..., .*-°N <,: x .. _ a x- ..';" .'_; ? : :r x , ? .

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan