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January 01, 1951 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1951-01-01

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MONDAY, JANUARY 1, 1951

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WAGE Tl

MONDAY, JANUARY 1, 1951 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE TI

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Snarling

Wolverines

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4rmy

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* * :.

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* * *

RCadet Reserve Strength
Provides 27-6_Victory
Ortmann's Passing Leads Maize and Blue
In Tremendous First Half Offensive Show
By BOB SANDELL
(Associate Sports Editor)
NEW YORK-A brilliant second half rally and a couple of reserve
halfbacks gave mighty Army its 23rd straight triumph yesterday and
fourth win without loss over Michigan's Wolverines.
The two backs, Al Pollard and Vic Pollock, sparked third and
fourth period drives that brought the Cadets a smashing 27-6 victory
before 67,076 fans in Yankee Stadium.
THE WOLVERINES, led by Charlie Ortmann, put on a tremen-
dous first half show for the huge crowd, and narrowly missed run-
ning the Cadets right off the field before intermission.
But beginning late' in the third quarter the Cadets could
do no wrong and they took advantage of the breaks to score
three quick touchdowns and doom the Michiganders to their
second setback in three games.
Michigan lost the services of their right halfback, Leo Koceski,
early in the second quarter and the Wolverines sorely missed his
running and kicking.

R+

U

-Daily-Ed Kozma
DUFEK CRASHES THROUGH THE CADET FORWARD WALL TO GIVE WOLVERINES 6-0 LEAD IN'ARMY GAME

MICHIGAN SOUVENIRS
SHEAFFER FINELINE PENCILS with a Michigan seal......$1.50
ASH TRAYS with Michigan seal .................19c and up
BOOK ENDS.................... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.75
SCRAP BOOKS.................. ................. .$2.00
STUFFED ANIMALS..........................$1.25 and up
PENNANTS and PILLOWS.......................all prices
MICHIGAN BLANKETS
$10
All Wool - Full Size
Michigan Playing Cards......... .$1.75 double deck
MUSICAL CIGARETTE BOX ... $10.95
It plays "The Victors" - Swiss mechanism

THE INVADING Maize and Blue
scored with little more than eight
minutes gone in the first period,
and narrowly missed tallying sev-
eral other times before the Cadets
tied the count just before the half
ended.
Fullback Don Dufek plunged
forthe lone Wolverine score
while Pollock scored twice and
Pollard and JackrMartin once
each for the Cadets.
Michigan received the kickoff
and on the third play nearly lost
the ball to Army deep in their own
territory. Pete Kinyon finally re-
covered Ortmann's fumble on the
13-yard line.
MICHIGAN THEN recovered two
successive Army fumbles and the
second one was costly for the
Cadets. Jim Cain, the Army .left
half, lost the pigskin on the 34-
yard line and Tony Momsen hop-
ped on it for the Wolverines.
It took the Wolverines just
six plays to score from that
point. Ortmann pitched to Bill
Putich for two first downs to
the Army ten. Dufek then took
over and hit right guard twice,
the second time going into the
end zone. The try for extra
point was fumbled.
Army could get nowhere after
the kickoff and the ball changed
hands several times before Mich-
igan began moving again shortly
before the second quarter opened.
* * *
THEY RECOVERED another
Cain fumble on the Army 48 and
weren't stopped until they reach-
ed the one-yard line.
Putich and Ortmann both
passed for good gains and for
the second time in the contest
the Wolverines were on the
Army ten with first down. Du-
fek went down to the three in
two plays, but then Frank How-
ell, substituting for the injured
Koceski, was caught on the five
for a loss.
With fourth down Putich went
back to pass. He could find no
receivers and started off to his
right with practically a clear field
in front of him. He was brought
down with less than a yard to go

TWO COACHES, CAPTAIN WAHL IN RANKS:
'M' Grid radition, Boasts 33 All-Americans

Heston First

Y

Of 5 .To Play
In Rose Bowl
By JOE EPSTEIN
Four of Michigan's thirty-three
All-American grid stars have per-
formed in the annual Rose Bowl
classic, and a fifth, Al Wahl, will
see action in today's' game.
Willie Heston, sensational half-
back on Fielding H. Yost's famous
"point-a-minute" teams, was a
member of the 1902 Wolverine ele-
ven which soundly trounced Stan-
ford in the New Year's Day con-
test by a 49-0 score.
* * *
HESTON was nominated for an
All-American slot by Walter Camp
in 1903 when Camp began his long
reign as Dean of the All-Ameri=
can team selectors, and was chosen
by Camp on the 1904 squad as well.
The 1948 team relied heavily on
the services of three All-Americans
-halfbacks Bob Chappuis and
Bump Eiliott and end Dick Rifen-
burg. Chappius had one of the
best days of his very successful
career, establishing a new Rose
Bowl record for total offense.
Michigan's first All-American,
selected in 1898 by Casper Whit-
ney of HARPER'S WEEKLY,
was the great Wolverine center
of that year, W. R. Cunningham.
s * "
IN 1907, Adolph "Germany"
Schultz, acclaimed by many as the
greatest center ever to wear the
Maize and Blue, was selected as
Michigan's third All-American. Al-
bert Benbrook, Michigan's huge 6'
6" guard, was named to both the
1909 and 1910 teams.
The first Wolverine end to be
honored as a Camp All-Ameri-
can was Stanfield Wells, another
member of the 1910 team.
After a three year lapse,/James
Craig became the sixth Michigan
All-American. Craig was followed
by another halfback, John Maul-
betsch, who was named on the
1914 team.
* * .
TWO OF THE members of the
1917 team earned berths in foot-
ball's most exclusive club; they

were fullback Cedric Smith, and'
Ernest Allmendinger, a guard. In
1918, Wolverine halfback Frank
Steketee inherited Smith's posi-
tion.
Michigan, after another three
year lapse, again began produc-
ing All-American gridders. Er-
nie Vick, in 1921, began a Wol-
verine domination of the center
slot which was to produce some
of the greatest pivot men in the.!
history of football.
Tn 499WarvKinr k 7hn 1af t

Harry Newman, was selected as
an All-American.
CHARLES BERNARD was the
sixth Michigan center thus honor-
ed. Also chosen to the All-Ameri-
can squad was Francis Wisert, the
first of three brothers who were to
keep the nafnes of Wistert and
Michigan continually in the foot-
ball headlines.
Ralph Heikkeneri, performing at
the guard slot, started the Michi-
gan football Renaissance when he
was chosen to the 1938 All-Ameri-I

enviable gridiron history, and a
man named by many as the great-
est back of all time. He was, of
course, Thomas Harmon,. who led
the Wolverines to two highly suc-
cessful seasons. Selected along
with Harmon in 1940 was end Ed-
ward Frutig.
Harmon's running mate, full-
back "Bullet Bob" Westfall, suc-
ceeded Harmon to the All-Amer-
ican team in 1941.
In 1942, the Wolverines again

berculosis, and Alb'ert Wistert,i
brother of Francis; and of Alvin,
All-American tackle in 1948 and
1949.
ONCE AGAIN, in 1943, Michigan
produced two All-Americans. These
1943 grid immortals were. tackle;
Melvin Pregulman, one of the f a-
mous line known as the Seven Oak
Posts, and hard-plunging fullback,
William Daley.

MAILED ANYWHERE

ULR1CH'S BOOK STORE
549 E. Univ. Ave., Ani Arbor, Michigan

In 1922, Harry ~p e, wn olater
coache th ichigan footl0l can team. had the services of two All-Amer-
coached the Mieohigan football * * * ican linemen - Julius Franks,
team, was named to the halfback THEN, IN 1939 and 1940, came whose great football career was
position. , , the greatest back in Michigan's cut short when he contracted tu-
JACK BLOTT. present Wolver- i

. I

.7AV17. LlIV.L i., V UUA A
ine line coach, was the next Maize
and Blue All-American center.
Blott played on the untied and
undefeated 1923 squad.
Then, in 1924, Blott was fol-
lowed by E. R. Slaughter, steady
Wolverine guard of that year.
* *
BENNIE OOSTERBAAN, one of
the few men ever to be chosen on
three All-American teams, was
probably the greatest end 'ever
produced at Michigan.
The present Wolverine grid
mentor was honored on the
1925, 1926 and 1927 teams; in
1926 he was joined by the pass-
ing half of the renowned combi-
nation, Benny Friedman.
* * *
THEN, IN 1928, Ot.- Pomme-
rening became the first tackle and
the seventh Michigan man in a
short seven year span to be chosen
on the official All-American team.
But, in the succeeding years, the
Wolverines were to place sixteen
more men on the mythical cham-
pionship team.'
In 1931, Wolverine center
Maynard Morrison was given a
place on the fabulous eleven,
and, in 1932, after guiding Mich-
igan to another undefeated sea-
son and another Big Ten crown,
t h e memorable quarterback,
ilb

FIEGELS
Wishes you
GOOD LUCK
MICHIGAN
Knew youd get to
the RoeBw!
Q MEN'S AND BOYS' CLOTHING
FEATURING HART SCHAFFNER & MARX
SUITS AND OVERCOATS
Q

flail to, the Uic tv'4
Congratulations to a Great Team
and Best Wishes
for. their continuing success
Ann Arbor Federal Savings Co.
Resources $15,000,000 - Reserve $1,000,000

'a

ow

i

for a touchdown.
* *
First Downs
Rushing Yardage
Passing Yardage
Passes Attempted
Passes Completed
Passes Intercepted
Punts
Punting Average
Fumbles Lost
Yards Penalized

MICH.
17
64
166
33
13
0
7
35
3
30

ARMY
8
223
74
6
3
4
6
46
5
46

SAVE

-,i

El1

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To a Great Michigan Team -
OUR CONGRA TULA TIONS
and Best Wishes!
ALLENEL HOTEL
for fine food
126 EAST HURON

iii

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III

11

FOR BETTER QUALITY,

7'Is'4

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III

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1111

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