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September 28, 1950 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Louis

Aga in

Retires

after

Uiarles 'Pummelting

*

*

*

*

*

+Ua~

Leaders
By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA - Sam Chap-
man snapped out of a paralyzing.
slump with a dramatic ninth inn-
ing home run with Ferris Fain on
base to beat the New York Yan-
kees 8 to 7 yesterday and extend
the American League pennant race
at least one more day.
Adding insult to injury, Chap-
man's blast into the left field seats
on a three-ball two-strike count
pitch, lowered the boom on the
Yankees' sensational rookie pitch-
er, Ed Ford. The 21-year-old left-
hander had won nine straight
games before yesterday. Ford came
in to pitch In the seventh after
Johnny Hopp batted for starter
Ed Lopat.'
AS A RESULT of the. sudden
Chapman poke, the Yankees still
need two victories or two Detroit
defeats or a combination of the
two, to win their 17th junior cir-
cuit flag.
NEW YORK-The floundering
Philadelphia= Phils dropped a
double header to the New York
Giants yesterday afternoon, 8-7

Fail

to

Clinch

Flags

Age Takes Toll on Louis
Reflexes as Charles Wins

.>

and 5-0, yet managed to move
closer toward the National League
pennant.
* :* *
WITH THE Brooklyn Dodgers
splitting . against the Boston
Braves, any combination of two-
two Philly wins, two Brooklyn de-
feats, or one Philly win and one
Brooklyn defeat--will do the trick
of nailing down the first flag in 35
years for the "Whiz Kids."
The Phils battled from behind
all day against the Giants. In
the opener, they came up with a
five run rally in the eighth ini-
ing to tie the score at 7-all and
send the game into overtime.
CLEVELAND-Bob Feller shut
out the Chicago White Sox, 7-0,
last night as the Cleveland Indians
ended their home season by ex-
tending a winning streak to seven
games, their longest string of the
season.
ST. LOUIS, Harry Brecheen
pitched a three-hit, 1-0 victory
over, the Cincinnati Reds, last
night, but Willard Ramsdell also

held the Cardinals to three hits,
and it was a first-inning error by
first baseman Ted Kluszewski that
let in the winning run.
Panuts Lowrey singled in the
first, and got to'second on an in-
field out. On another infield. out
Kluszewski tried to nail Lowrey at
third but threw low and Lowrey
scored.
' * * *
DETROIT--The Detroit Tigers
found their claws again yester-
day as they outfought the St. Louis
Browns 5-4 to pick up a full game
in the American League race and
keep their .slender pennant hopes
alive.
DETROIT bunched four hits, in-
MAJOR LEAGUE
STANDINGS
AMERICAN LEAGUE

cluding Pat Mullin's fourth homer,
in a four-run sixth inning to take
a 4-1 lead which Art Houtteman
could not hold as he yielded a run
in the seventh.
Former Tiger Stubby Over-
mire, who had won his last three
games, took over St. Louis'
pitching duties in the ninth and
was greeted by a booming triple
off Johnny Groth's bat.
BROOKLYN - The Brooklyn
Dodgers blew an opportunity to.
close in on the Philadelphia Phil-
lies yesterday by splitting a dou-
ble-header w i t h the Boston
Braves.
Brookyn took the opener, 9-6,
but lost the nightcap, 4-2. The
split moved the Dodgers to within
four games of the Phils.
BOSTON - The troublesome
Washington Senators knocked
Boston's Red Sox out of any
chance for the American League
pennant yesterday by taking both
ends of a doubleheader, 2-0 and
6-3.
CHICAGO-The Chicago Cubs
got away to a four run lead in
the first inning yesterday, but.
the Pittsburgh Pirates tied the
score in the second inning and
went on to win, 7 to 4.

v-

(Continued from Page 1)

New York 96
Detroit 93
Boston 91
Cleveland 90
Washington 67
Chicago 58
St. Louis 57
Philadelphia 51

55
57
59
61
84
93
93,
101.

.636
.620
.607
.596'
.444
.384
.380
.336

r
_ _.w it fieom PtaY deny

in the
tticol scores?

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Owh~ic l knocked out o i'
*..whwie dr fortO ehad a hit wee tnorhrin
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"ot by l 9a od your chokeO
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Phila
Broom
Bost
New
St. b
Cinci
Chica
Pitts

NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pet.
delphia 90 60 .600
iklyn 85 63 .574'
on 82 66 .554
York 82 68 .547
.ouis 74 74 .500
innati 64 85 .429
ago 63 86 .423
burgh 56 94 .373

2'
4x/
6
29
38
38%/
451/2
GB
. .. *
7
8
15'
251 /x
261/
34

the crown he wore for nearly 12
years before he retired In March
of '49, was completely unable to
cope with the slender, relent-
less slasher from Cincionnati.
Toward the end, Charles, who
conceded 331/2 pounds to the old
bomber, was trying for a knock-
out. Louis at times looked as
though he might weather the
storm, though he never ceased to
try to fight back.
* * *
IT WAS A SAD finish for the
once great champion in the eyes
of the thousands who had seen
him at the height of his ring glory.
His left eye was pounded shut and
blood poured from his nose as, in
the 14th round, he held momen-
tarily to the top rope and appear-
ed uncertain whether he could
continue.
Charles, holder of the National
Boxing Association version of the
World Championship since he de-
feated Jersey Joe Walcott last
summer, proved his claim to uni-
versal recognition. The confidence
he gained last night will make him
a tough man to deprive of the
bauble at any near future date.
' * * *
Twice Ezzard was in trouble,
in the fourth and tenth rounds.
In the fourth Joe caught him
flush with a left-right to the
head and buckled his knees in
the first 30 seconds, but Charles
survived the ensuing onslaught
and was fighting back fiercely
before the bell.
Joe had his second and last
chance in the 10th, which he won
by a wide margin. He staggered
the champion with a short right
to the face at the outset of the
round and dealt him a mrutal beat-
ing from there until the bell as
the crowd yelled madly for a
knockout.
Referee Mark Conn voted it 10-

WahiSparks Wolverine Defense
ahl Spark

CAPTAIN AL WAHL
* * * * * *

is

You'll find the answers
to these and many other
sport facts in the new
1950-51 Sports Show
Book.
Send for your
copy today
IT'S FREE!

TODAY'S GAMES
AMERICAN LEAGUE
St. Louis at Detroit--Pillette
(3-4) vs. Hutchinson (17-8).
New York at Philadelphia-
Raschi (21-8) vs. Wyse (9-14)
or Hooper (15-10).
Boston at Washington -
Stobbs (11-7) vs. Pascual (1-0).
(Only games scheduled.)
NATIONAL LEAGUE
Philadelphia at New York
(2) -Johnson (4-1) and Meyer
(9-11) vs. Jansen (18-13) and
Kramer (3-6).
Boston at Brooklyn (2) -
Chipman (6-7) and Haefner
(17) vs. Roe (19-11) and Hat-
ten (2-2).
Cincinnati at St. Louis
(night)-Raffensberger (14-18)
vs. Pollet (13-13) or Boyer
(7-8).
(Only games scheduled.)
REMAINING GAMES:
American League
New York at home (0); away
(3) Philadelphia 1, Boston 2.
Detroit at home (4) St.
Louis 1, Cleveland 3.
National League
Philadelphia at home (0);
away (4) New York (2), Brook-
lyn 2.
Brooklyn at home (6); Bos-
ton 4, Philadelphia 2.

0

R R
e
A. G. Spalding & Bros., Dept. NC e
161 Sixth Avenue
New York 13, N. Y.
Please send me a free copy of the.1950-51 Spalding 1
Sports Show Book by return mail.
Sx
Name _
Address UN
R - 1r
a Y
R x
t e
N x
R
TAKmm auNwut umxuaRJLRJ 1 11R[1 .R uwunwutm ull 11Mmum

Cat-like Al Wahl, 220-pound
senior from Oak Park, Illinois,
will lead the Michigan football
team as it takes the field Satur-
day afternoon to open the 1950
season.
A defensive standout at tackle
for two years, the Wolverine cap-
tain is the keystone in Coach
Bennie Oosterbaan's forward wall,
and may see double duty as the
Maize and Blue seek their fourth
straight Big Ten title.
* * *
WAHL. who learned quickness
and fodtwork as a boxing champ
in the U.S. Army of Occupation
in Germany, teamed with last
year's captain, Al Wistert, to make
the '49 squad the strongest defens-
ive machine in the Big Ten.
Back in the days of the
"freshman wonder" team of
1945, Wahl was rated as a great
prospect.
A standout lineman in high
school, he was expected to take
his place alongside the yearling
crew which included Dom Tomasi,
Walt Teninga, Howard Yerges, and
Jack Weisenburger. But an in-
jury sidelined Wahl and he didn't
get a chance to prove his mettle
until two years later.
* * *
IT WAS in the interim that the
Michigan captain served in the
armed forces occupation of Ger-
many. In the Army, he took up
boxing to keep in shape and won
17 bouts, 14 by knockouts.
In 1948 Wahl returned to
Michigan and football. As a
sophomore he was a defensive
cyclone. After repeatedly nailing
enemy ball-carriersduring goal-
Anyone except golf letter
winners is invited to sign up for
the " annual Trueblood Cup
Tournament at the University
course. N mes must be entered
at the clubhouse before qualify-
ing begins on Sunday, October
1.
-Bert Katzenmeyer

line stands, he was given the
nickname "Brick" Wahl by fans
and players.
He came into his own with a
vengeance last season, and earned
a place on Grantland Rice's All-
American team.
* * *
AS THE fifth straight lineman
to be named captain of the Wol-
STUDENT TICKETS
Today is the last day before
Saturday's opening game with
Michigan State that season
tickets will be available for
distribution to students.
All students must secure'
their ticketsat Barbour Gym by
next Tuesday, October 3rd.
--Don Weir
verines, Coach Oosterbaan ex-
pects big things from the fiery
tackle.
Leadership of Michigan grid
squads isn't new in Wahl's fami-
ly. Herb ,Steger, Al's uncle, cap-
tained the 1924 Wolverines.
- With such defensive standouts
as Al Wistert, Dick Kempthorn,
and Lloyd Heneveld gone, Wahl's
experience should act as a steady-
ing influence for a partially green
Wolverine line.
WAHL WILL also see some ser-
vice on, the offense, where his
speed and weight shouldberneed-
ed as the Maize and Blue tangles
with such vaunted opponents as
Army, Illinois, and Minnesota.
It was his work against the last-
named team which stood out in
the comeback defeat of Bernie
Bierman's Rose Bowl-hungry Go-
phers. A large part of the credit
for bottling up the huge Minneso-
ta line must be awarded to the
"Brick" Wahl.
This year the Wolverines will
count on the big tackle to repeat
his fine '49 performance and carry
on his double responsibility as cap-
tain in capable fashion.
Already this year Al Wahl has
been picked on the All-Amert-

can first team at tackle by vir-
tually every sports writer and
pool. His chances of being pick-
ed for the All-American team
this year are almost certain by
the fact that he may play both
defensive and offensive tackle.
Many sports writers have pre-
ferred to pick men who play both
offense and defense, and so Wahl
will have this possible advantage
on his side when he sees double
duty.

Campus Interviews on Cigarette Tests
Number 1...THE PUFFIN BIRD

1 :$f' r:' ,
A. :4 i
I~ 'e , -A'
VC h.
S .. 1 ,r

Designed for Men of Michigan
SOTU DERI EAD LE
'ALL CLOTHING LAUNDERED, FLUFF DRIED, AND NEATLY FOLDED.

J. Paul Sheedy* Switched to Wildroot Cream-Oil
Because He Flunked The Finger-Nail Test

4 pounds minimum..
Each additional pound

. . . . . . . . 50c
. . . . . . . . 12c

I

The following articles are finished at a low extra, cost:

SHIRTS, each additional

17c

. . . . .

HANDKERCHIEFS, each additional

. . 3c

SOCKS,- pair,

each additional

3c

"What's all the huffn' and puffin' about?
I've been a Puffin all my life!",
You may think this "bird" is funny - but he's no
odder than many of the cigarette tests you're asked to make these days.
One puff of this brand - one sniff of that. A quick inhale - a fast exhale -
and you're supposed to know what cigarette to smoke from then on. The sensible
test doesn't have to rely on tricks and short cuts. It's a day-after-
day, pack-after-pack tryout -for 30 days. That's the.
test Camel asks you to make! Smoke Camels regularly for
30 days. Your "T-Zone" (T for Throat, T for Taste)
is the best possible proving ground for any cigarette.
After you've made the Camel 30-Day Mildness Test,

0 0 .

10%/

Discount on
Laundry and Dry Cleaning
Cash and Carry

SHEEDY WAS NEEDYI He was the worst neck on campus,
and everybody looked down on him the minute they spotted
his messy hair. Poor Paul was gonna zoo somebody until he
herd about Wildroot Cream-Oil. Now, he's head and shoulder's
above every guy at school I Non-alcoholic Wildroot with Lan-
olin keeps hair neat and well-groomed all day long. Relieves

U A tL i T s .

I

i

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ma

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