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December 19, 1950 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-12-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


TUESDAY, DECEMBER 19, 1950

1 HE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNFLOWER LOVERS:
Proper Menu Attracts
BirdsThroughWinter

The bird who comes to dinner
can be enticed into staying all
winter long, if a proper bill of
fare is prvoided for him according
to Prof. George M. Sutton of the
zoology department.
Discussing the favorite food
items of birds, Prof. Sutton noted
that many birds are very fond of
sunflower seeds. Bird lovers can
usually make arrangements with
a farmer to save complete sun-
flower heads for them, he advised.
*e * *
THE sunflower seeds should be
strung up in such a way that they
will attract downy and hairy
woodpeckers, chickadees and the
tufted titmouse.
The cardinal relishes this
food, too, but for this indolent
bird, the seed should be placed
on the ground, because he dis-
likes flying up to get it, Prof.
Sutton explained.
Other foods which are great
favorites of feathered vertebrates
are cracked nuts, hickory nuts,
peanuts, black walnuts, and of
course, the lump of suet tacked to
the trunk of a tree or placed in a
container of kitchen wire through
which the birds can peck.
* *
OF COURSE, a bird lover must
decide on a sheltered spot, safe

from pouncing cats an dstrong
winds, if he wants birds to come
to his winter feeding station, Prof.
Sutton continued.
No special equipment is needed
for such a station, the zoologist
pointed out. In selecting the spot
for placing the food, a partial roof
or awning above the window is a
good thing, he asserted.
"People who want to attract
birds to the feeding station
should 'take advantage of the
snowfalls. Many birds in need of
shelter from a snow storm seek
out sheltered places," Prof.
Sutton said.
One of the prettiest birds a
bird-lover can have as a "guest"
during the winter is the evening
grosbeak. a black-white-green-
yellow bird about the size of a
robin, according to Prof. Sutton.
Bobwhites may also be seen at
winter feeding stations occasion-
ally.
The brown creeper, another ka-
leidoscope of colors with a slender
curved bill, will often slip in when
the other birds have finished and
will stay as long as the others will
let him, he added.
"The titmouse and chicadee
may get bold enough to eat out of
your hand," he noted.

Squirrel Gives
Flirting Coed
Cold Haunch
By ANN HAGAN
It's not often a squirrel and a
coed chew the rag together.
But it's even less frequent when
a squirrel chews alone.
Such was the case when an ap-
ple-cheeked, eager young coed ap-
proached a squirrel with a flaming
orange tail and began click-click-
clicking.
"WE HAD such a nice time,"
she sighed. "I thrust out a red-
mittened hand, continued to click,
and darned if the little fellow
didn't inch upand begin knawing
on me."
"It was great fun at first, but
after awhile I got a little uncom-
fortable. I edged my hand away
politely and went into a nearby
store for some nuts. I came back
as friendly as ever. The squirrel
looked at me, curled his lip and
marched away with nose in air."
"I was just crushed," she
wept.
The rodent when interviewed
gave his point of view. "I like
nothing better than a pretty coed
-urrumph!-but gad, what a
flirt. Couldn't lose my pride, so ig-
nored her when she returned."
"Of course if I'd known she had
nuts . .."

PART OF U.S. PROGRAM:
Foreign Students Teach English
,,

By HILDA EITEL
Practice teaching is no longer
confined to those studying to be-
come teachers in the American
schools.
Students enrolled in the English
Language Institute's class, Spe-
cial Problems in Teaching the
English Language, take it upon
themselves .to choose a foreign
University student at random and
correct his speech errors in Eng-
lish.
BECAUSE OF their previous
knowledge of languages they are
well qualified to do this sort of
teaching.hFor example. Japanese
students have trouble distinguish-
ing "sch" sounds from "dge"
sounds.
Consequently they say "pled-
ge-ur" instead of "pleasure" and
tredge-ur"' instead of "trea-
sure." It is these pronounciation
difficulties with which the stu-
dents work.
The Institute, under the sup-
ervision of Prof. Charles C. Fries,
presents a four-point program.
The first type of work it offers
is an intensive eight-week train-
ing program which is given six
times a year to foreign students
who wish to familiarize themselves
with the American scene.
* * *
THE SECOND group is known
as the teacher program. Here in-
structors from foreign countries
and the United States are trained
in linguistic analysis of English
and in methods of teaching.
At present the Institute boasts
a large percentage of students
attending under the National
Leaders Program which was

" By CRAWFORD YOUNG
Daily Nostalgia Expert
One hundred years ago, Santa
C) tus arrived in the provincial
v derness outpost of Ann Arbor
'by way of fashionable New York
and Boston, a search through the
files of the old Ann Arbor Argus
revealed.
Department stores of that day
were offering fabulous Yuletide
bargains on goods imported from
the East. One advertised that ten
dozen lamb's wool men's drawers,
guaranteed to be right off Fifth
Avenue, were available for record
low prices.
BEAVEIC HATS were the height

LANGUAGE INSTITUTE-Prof. Robert Lado (center) looks on
as Eiichi Hayashi, Grad. (left) instructs Kenzo Mraumo, Grad., in
English pronunciation.
* * * <a* * *

We Can End Your
CHR ISTMAS APPLIANCE
Worries with our
FLOOR LAMPS, BED LAMPS, STUDY LAMPS
SILEX COFFEE-MAKERS, HOT PLATES
EELECTRIC MIXERS, IRONS, TOASTERS

established by the Department
of Defense this summer.
Through this plan the United
States government sends a small,
select group of foreign students
to our schools for specialized
training, according to Prof. Fries.

'-""-

THIS YEAR the University re-
ceived twenty-four Japanese stu-
dents, all of whom are English
teachers attending under this
plan. These trainees, who will be
permitted to spend a year in
America, are participating in the
activities of the Institute.
The third part of the program
involves providing material, such
as tests, for both the students
enrolled in the Institute and
those enrolled in schools abroad.
Lastly the Institute does re-
search work in the realm of lang-
uage and methods of teaching it.
.Regular credits are given for
courses taken at the Institute, al-
though no fixed number of hours
is required. Among the subjects
now offered to this group are
Linguistic Science, Modern Eng-
lish Grammar, Phonetics and
Phonemics-the sciences of the
sound of vowels and consonants-
and Problems in Teaching.
Nor is their program confined
entirely to academic subjects. The
group frequently has dances, pic-
nics and trips. They also have a
social evening every Friday nigrt
in Rackham Assembly Hall which
is open to all students attending
the Institute. The program for
this occasion often varies.
It may be a musical, a lecture, or
even a round table discussion.
However, no matter what type of
program is presented, the Insti-
tute urges student participation.
They feel that by getting stu-
dents to take part, they can ac-
quaint them more readily with
the English language and its use-
age.

By MOHAMMED ABUSAM
Several decades have passed
since Sigmund Freud, the founder
of modern psychology, first ex-
pounded his famous sex theories;
since then, nothing has escaped
the Freudian sex label-not even
Christmas.
The possibility that many of
our yuletide customs are rooted
in the "omnipotent" sex drive, or
libido as Freud called it, has been
reasserted by a University psy-
chologist.
For one, the psychologist, who
preferred to remain unidentified,
suggested that a child's belief in
Santa Claus might stem from the
Freudian Oedipus Complex.
TO PSYCHOLOGISTS, the Oe-
dipus Complex is a Freudian label
for a child's love for his mother
and his rivalry with his father for
her affection. In other words, at
an early age, the child considers
his father an intruder.
"As a result of this father-son
friction, the child feels more in-
secure at home and desires more
affection," the psychologist as-
serted. "It is noteworthy that
Santa. makes his debut about
this time."
The child easily accepts St.
Nick, he explained, and his con-
ception of him would naturally be
that of 'a kind, good-natured, gen-
erous man.
FREUD, THE psychologist also
pointed out, linked the sex drive
to the origin of religion itself-
including Christianity.
"Freud traced the development
of religion in his "Totem and Ta-.
boo," he continued, "and his the-
ory went all the way back to the
time man was a primitive crea-
ture."
At that time, according to
Freud's theory, there existed one
male, the stronger of the lot
and the leader, who exercised
his authority over the entire
tribe and denied the young
males access to the women.
Finally, the angry young males
rose in rebellion, killed their lead-
er, and devoured him.
But they were then possessed
(Continued on Page 13)

Y
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