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December 15, 1950 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-12-15

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i'O . THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 15, 1950

SNOW, HEATING HEADACHE:
'U' Maintenance Proves Enormous Job

By BOB KEITH
Headaches are nothing new for
Walter M. Roth, superintendent
of the University's vast Plant
Service department.
With its operations spread all
over campus, the plant depart-
ment is entrusted with the steady
tasks of running the University
heating and electrical plant,
maintaining vehicles, keeping
buildings clean and in good re-
pair and shoveling snow and mow-
ing grass.
AND SCATTERED among its
year in-year out assignments are
special services such as building
cabinets or odd-dimension tables
for professors and putting up
lights or building bandstands for
assorted student groups.
International
Center Will Be
Open for Yule
Foreign students remaining in
Ann Arbor during the Christmas
vacation will find the Interna-
tional Center open as usual.
No- special program is planned
for the holiday and regular organ-
ized meetings will cease for the
two week period, but the recrea-
tional facilities and the lounges
will be available for all those who
are left here after the vacation ex-
odus.
And, thanks to the cooperation
of civic and church groups, many
students will partake of Christmas
dinner in the homes of Ann Ar-
bor citizens.
A good many students have al-
ready been placed in homes for
Christmas day, but invitations are
still welcome, according to Charles
Arnade, program director.
The Center also arranged for a
few students to go out of town
for the entire vacation. Two are
going. to Jackson. And a group of
eight students have been invited
to Bedford, 0. where they will
celebrate the holidays in a family
atmosphere.

All told, the task is no small
one for the 600-man force
which Roth heads, and the
Plant Service sometimes finds it
difficult to satisfy completely
the hundreds who call on it
every year for help.
The Plant Superintendent said
he has heard several complaints
about the amount the depart-
ment charges for its services. He
readily acknowledges that the
prices are high, but he doesn't
see much that can be done about
it.
ENGULFED by soaring costs for
labor and materials, the Plant Ser-
vice has no choice but to pass
some of its costs to those it serves,
Roth explained. The department
is annually allotted approximately
two million dollars of the Univer-
sity General Funds appropriation.
But this money, he pointed out, is
only enough to cover regular main-
tenance expenses, operations, and
certain alterations.
Even at that, Roth said, the
department must cut a few cor-
ners. University janitorial ser-
Technic .Issue
Will Feature
PhoenixStory
The December issue of the Tech-
nic, scheduled to go on sale Mon-
day, is devoted entirely to the
Phoenix Project.
Included in the 48 page issue,
a large one by Technic standards,
will be several pictures of the 1946
Bikini explosion of the atomic
bomb which have never before
been released. These pictures come
from the library, of Dean Ralph
Sawyer df the graduate school, who
was technical director for the tests.
Contributing to the issue are
Sen. Homer Ferguson, Marvin Lu-
beck, '51, student chairman of the
project; Dean Erich Walter; Dean
Ivan C. Crawford of the engineer-
ing college; and Gordon Dean,
chairman of the Atomic Energy
Commission. An article on "The
Atom and Economic Research"
and many other features will also
appear.

vice, for example, can at present
be no more than one-third as
thorough as in most modern of-
fice buildings, he noted.
And while the Plant Service
is burdened by heavy regular
expenses, its special jobs for
students and faculty result in an
additional financial load.
Some of these jobs, such as
construction of special wooden or
steel, classroom apparatus, are
taken care of in the large shop
in the rear of the Plant Service
headquarters on N. University.
The cost of such work is higher
than it would be if it were on a
mass basis, Roth remarked. '"Each
order requires individual planning
and. workmanship," he explained.
"If we were producing every item
in quantity it would be much
cheaper," he said.
* * *
OTHER special jobs, such as
helping students prepare for pep
rallies or dances, of course, re-
quire workmen at various parts of
the campus at specific times.
"Unless the students are far-
sighted and careful in their,
,planning, such work is likely to
run into costly overtime hours,"
Roth asserted.
When asked what he thought of
a permanent, portable band-stand
to help student groups reduce
costs, the plant chief replied that
it would actually cost more than
the present system under which
a new stand is constructed for
each dance. "The storage charges
and labor in setting up and mak-
ing alterations' in a permanent
stand would probably run higher'
than the $100 or so it now costs to
build a new stand, he said.
* * *
AS FOR overall efficiency, Roth
readily conceded that there is al-
ways room fo'r improvement in a
maintenance department such as
his. On several occasions students
have taken some digs at the de-
partment's efficiency, but after a
little retrospection they admitted
that part of the fault is theirs.
Most camp~us groups,- in fact,
have more than a toleranit attitude
toward the Plant Service. Of
course, they may not particularly
like the charges, but they seem to
realize that they are necessary.
'UI' Professor, 70,
Dies After Illness
Dr. John Sundwall, professor
emeritus of hygiene and public
health and a founder of the Uni-
versity's School of Public Health
died Wednesday night after a
short illness.
He was 70 years ol1.
Dr. Sundwall was on the Uni-
versity faculty from 1921 until
last June when he was made pro-
fessor emeritus.

J
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-Daily-Jack Bergstrom
/ROUND AND ROUND-Mrs. Dorothy Legg seems hypnotized
by the revolving of the small angels on her angel-abra as most
passers-by have been. Mrs. Legg put the gimmick on her re-
ceptionist's desk in the lobby of the General Administration
Building to serve as a seasonal decoration.
Original Display Gives Holiday
Air to Administration Building

Conference
To Consider
Peace Aids,
Consideration of possible activi-
ties within the University com-
munity that can help the cause of
world peace will be the main pur-
pose of the student sponsored
peace conference to be held tomor-
row at Lane Hall.
The conference, which is being
sponsored by the .Student Reli-
gious Association, will concentrate
on the philosophical, religious and,
social approaches to the achieve-
ment of lasting world peace.
. * * *
ORIGINATED BY a group of
students who felt that a virtual
Communist monopoly in activities
for peace should be broken, the
conference will hear four differ-
ent approaches to the problem at
its opening session at 10 a.m.
Prof. Preston Slo'sson of the
history department will speak on
"Peace, the Internationalist's
Solution"; Edward G. Voss,
Grad will discuss "Christian Pa-
cificism"; Prof. Claude Eggers-
ton of the education school will
talk on the approach of UNESCO
to the problem; and Ghandi's
method of passive resistance will.
be presented by Sohon Lah
Sharma, Grad.
After these addresses, the con-
ference will break up into discus-
sion groups, each of which will
discuss a particular approach to
the problem.
The conference will continue all
day except for breaks for lunch
and tea which will be provided by
Lane Hall for a one dollar charge.

The cold facts of the Medical
School admission requirements ap-
pear to be the prime consideration
of almost all of the University's.
pre-medical - students when they
set about planning their days in
college.
The fear of not being admitted
to Medical School is the motivat-
ing force behind their schedule
planning, their participation in ex-
tra-curricular activities and their
over-all outlook on campus life.
+t . *

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M(edical School,'the students with
the highest grades would be the
ones satisfied and that the only
way to get higher grades was to
devote oneself completely to his
pre-medical studies.
One student went so far as to
point out these inconsistencies of
the faculty and to "appeal" to
those in power to employ broader
criteria.
Prof. Bruno Meinecke, of the
Latin dept., apparently sensing
a sort of forced inadequacy exist-
ing in some pre-meds and med
students, threw out a hint that
perhaps the philosophy of the ad-
missions committee ought to be
changed. He quoted Dr. William
Rappleye .of Columbia University
as saying that there should be no
such thing as a pre-med educa-

:

THESE FACTS were pointeda
out at the Conference on Pre-med-
ical Education which met earliers
this week. Staffed by experts, pre-
pared with sheafs of specific ques-.n
tions and prodded by anxious stu-
dents, the panel waded through
the essentials of the problems thata
now confront the serious mindeds
pre-medical student.
In the early part of the discus-
sions the pre-meds were assured
of the values of extra-curricular
activities and well-rounded curri-
cular activities and well-rounded
curriculums.
Each member of the panel
showed that the doctor is not a
complete individual, nor s he a
competent doctor unless he has
done more in college than study
medicine. They went on to as-
sure the audience that through
participation in extra-curricular
activities and a smattering of
non-technical subjects in their
programs, they' would more fully
qualify for the profession.
But the students in the audience
didn't seem satisfied. Some felt
that all of the suggestions of the
panel were fine but when it got,
down to deciding who shall and
who shall not gain entrance to the

ALL WORK, NO PLAY?
Conference Discusses
Medical Requirements

Lion.

Last year it was a gumdrop tree,
this year it's an "angel-abra"
which is.spreading Christmas spi-
rit in the lobby of the General Ad-
ministration Building.
The three-foot high angel-abra
can best be described as a Rube
Goldberg. More specifically, it is
made up of three candles, the
warm air from which causes an
umbrella like arrangement of three
angels above the candles to re-
volve. As they move, the angels
in turn strike two bells.
* * *
MRS. DORTHY LEGG, the re-
ceptionist, has added her own mo-
dernistic interpretation of a
Christmas tree to the angel-abra.
This consists of a limb from a
thornapple tree and some metal
pom-poms.
The history of the contraption
is less complicated. The person
behind its appearance, Mrs.
Legg, explained that she had
purchased the gimmick from a
mail-order house.
But that wasn't where the an-
gel-abra originated.
It seems, Mrs. Legg quoted the
company's catalogue-"many years.
ago in the kingdom of Bavaria
a devoted troubadour fashioned
the first angel-abra. Presented to
a beautiful Princess Anna, it cap-
tured her fancy and became her
most prized possession."
* * *.
LAST YEAR, when she had the
gumdrop tree, Mrs. Legg had
spread Christmas cheer by giving,
appropriately enough, gumdrops.
This year, though there is no can-

I~w.

SAVINGS
INSURED TO
by Federal Savings and'
Loan Insurance Corpora.
tion. Open an account
with any amount. Earn
2% current rate.

Unpopular'!

dy, there will still be at least one
gift given away.
Stealing a trick from the give-
away programs,/ Mrs. Legg has
decided on a magic word. If this
word is brought up in conversa-
tion with the receptionist, the
person who. does so will receive,
as Mrs. Legg put it, "a small
package which it is hoped that4
they will not open until Christ-1
mas."
What is in the package, or what
the word is, she would give no
hint, except to say that the word'
hasn't been mentioned at all so
far during this Christmas season.
* * *
THOUGH NO ONE has men-
tioned the magic word, comments
on the angel-abra have been com-
ing in thicle and fast since it was
put up on Monday.
Most attention has centered, on
the bells, which some people hear
and some people don't. It all de-
pends on air currents whether the
bells ring or not, Mrs. Legg ad-
mitted privately, but publicly she
tells people that literary college
students are best adapted to hear
the heavenly tinkle.
"You see," she explains for the
benefit of reporters and others
slow of intellect, "the headquarters
of the literary college are in An-
gell Hall."
Operetta Will
Continue Run
Twin boatmen will ascend the
Baratarian throne again tonight in
the second performance of the Gil-
Bert and Sullivan Society's produc-
tion of "Gondoliers," at 8 p.m. in
Pattengill Auditorium of Ann Ar-
bor High School.
Followed by their loving ladies,
the 'two gondoliers abandon their
native Venice and their singing
trade to split the rule of the is-
lajid kingdom. Their lazy but ef-
ficient management of its affairs
wins back their wives who had
been afraid that their exalted sta-
tion would make them scornful
of lowly Venetian women.
Witboa mixture of gaily dressed
red-herrings and sparkling tunes
the two pairs get reunited, and all
cast members .break into a fan-
dango to celebrate.
Tickets for today and tomor-
row's performances are on sale at
the Administration Bldg., from 9
a.m. to 4:30 p.m. today and from
9 a.m. to noon tomorrow and at
Pattengill Auditorium from 7 to
8 p.m. Prices are 90 cents and $1.20.
Tickets for the Detroit perform-
ance which will be held Monday
in Racliham Auditorium are also
available at the Administration
Bldg.

208 Michigan T
Ph. 2-2

Cheater Bldg.
072

) CIlSKM4$.
lo
On
RCA VICTOR RECORDS
We Recommend an All-Time Favorite
CHRISTMAS HYMNS AND CAROLS
RCA VICTOR CHORALE
ROBERT SHAW, Conductor
Also Available on LP ($5.45) and 45 RPM ($4.51)
OTHER RECORDINGS by the Shaw Chorale include: The Bach B Minor Mass;
Bach Cantatas, Nos. 131, 140; Poulenc's Mass In G; Britten's Ceremony of Carols .
Hear them at the
Operated by Musicians for Music Lovers
FREE DELIVERY, OF COURSE

PORTRAIT
Photography
FRAMES
for Photographs
a &u ko

A

INEXPENSIVE DATE:
Museum Holds Open Houses

Benito the First didn't last. And nobody
lasts long socially who runs the risk of
bad breath. Always carry BREATH-
O-LATOR-the amazing little mouth
inhaler that neutralizes breath odors
instantly, completely. BREATH-O-
LATOR contains Neutragen (each'
wafer good for two weeks; refills
3 for 250).You just breathe in-deeply,
twice. Odors are neutralized at source:
mouth, nose, throat. Harmless. "Keep
a fresh breath in your pocket." Get
BREATH-O-LATOR today, at all
good drug counters. (A Bing Crosby
Research Foundation project.)

116 North Fourth Ave.
Opposite Court House
Phone 2-25491
Assets Over $15,000,000

The problem of where to go on
a Friday night date can be com-
pletely and cheaply solved.
In contrast to the more expen-
sive regular weekend events, for
no charge at all, the University
Museums provide a weekly open-
house from 7-9 p.m. with a
glimpse of everything from the
sex-life of the lowest animals to
the development of the human
embryo.
FOR A VIEW of what is going
on at the bottom of the warm
tropical waters, George March-

and, visiting artist to the Muse-
ums, has dreamed up an exhibit
he calls "Bermuda Coral Reef
Fauna."
He has reproduced fish and
other sea life from original
molds owned by the Buffalo Art
Museum.
To get the original molds, Mar-
chand, protected by a sea-diver's
helmet, descended to the bottom
of the ocean of f the shores of
Bermudaecomplete with zinc
plates and oil paints to capture
the beauty of under-the-sea life.
ANOTHER INTERESTING dis-
play, planned by Irving Reimann,
prefect of exhibits, is called
"Adaptations for Flight." In col-
orful reproductions are the bones
used by certain vertabrae which
make them particularly equipped
for flying and gliding.
The Museums present a regular
program every Friday evening
along with the open house in the
hopes of acquainting more people
on campus with museums' activi-
ties.

PHONE 2-0675

205 EAST LIBERTY

HAVE YOU MADE YOUR RESERVATIONS
ON THE
HOLIDAY SPECIALS'
Greyhound Lines - THROUGH BUSES - Short Way Lines

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Wolverine Club offers

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ANN ARBOR TO:

FARES
One Way Round Trip*
5.25' 9:45

CHIICAGO, 'LL.

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Leaving Time
3:30 P.M.

CLEVELAND, OHIO . . 4.40 7.95 3:30 P.M.
GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 3.35 6.05 3:30 P.M.
PITTSBURGH, PA. . . . 6.85 12.35 3:30 P.M.
Connections for New York, Washington and Points East.

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The mosnt unusual]
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For Hichi~an
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X56 Saving on Pullman Fare
Reserved Leg-Rest Coaches
Complete Club Car and Diner Service
SAME AS "EL CAPITAIN"
MANY OPTIONAL FEATURES

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8.65 15.60

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Connections for All Points in Upper Peninsula.
Plus 15% Federal Tdx
BUSES LEAVE MICHIGAN UNION FRIDAY, DECEMBER 22
D A a.:.. -.c . A -a A i n a d. .- LlA a 1rsa nnr. 1..aRise

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