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December 10, 1950 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-12-10

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SUNDAY DECEMBER 10, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Conference
Wilson Granted Power
Over Athletes, Schools

Sharpens

Teeth

for

n

I
a

Ban of Live Television Upheld by
Rose Bowl Pact, Sanity Code on

Big Ten;
Agenda

CHICAGO -(P)- The Big Ten
commissioner, who formerly only
policed Conference athletic prac-
tices, yesterday was handed au-
thority also to punish violations of
recruiting and subsidization bans.
The Conference athletic direc-
tors and faculty representatives
voted to vest Commissioner K. L.
(Tug) Wilson with power not only
to ferret out, but also crack down
on individual athletes or schools
involved in proselyting.
* * *
THE CONFERENCE also voted
to support a motion to ban live
television of Big Ten football
games in 1951 if such sentiment
develops at the N.C.A.A. national
convention at Dallas, Tex., Jan.'
12-13. Live video was barred by
the Big Ten this football sea-
son.

v/

The TV action by faculty re-
presentatives and athletic di-I
rectors followed their meeting
with presidents of six member
schools who were said to be
"sympathetic and understand-
ing" of problems on TV con-
fronting athletic directors.
There was no discussion of re-
newal of the Rose Bowl contract
with the Pacific Coast Conference
or of the N.C.A.A. sanity code, but
those subjects may be taken up
when the annual winter meeting
concludes today.
PREVIOUSLY, THE cWmmis-
sioner could only investigate such
cases after a formal complaint
was filed by another party and
submit his findings for -action by
the faculty representatives and
athletic directors.
Now, he can initiate investi-
gation on his own authority'
and mete out punishment rang-
ing from an official reprimand
to schedule banning in' the
affected sport for violating
schools, and ruling a year's in-
eligibility for each year an ath-
lete receives illegal financial aid.
For flagrant violations, the

Commissioner can recommend to1
the faculty representatives, the
league's policy-making group, that
the guilty school be dropped from
Conference membership.
4. * * -
IN ADOPTING a report by a
six-man committee recommend-
ing the change in commissioner
duties, the faculty representative-
athletic director group also spe-
cified that the Commissioner can
fix an immediate 10-day suspen-
sion of the affected athlete or
school.
If within this period, the vio-
lator does not appeal for a hear-
ing before the faculty represen-
tatives, the suspension becomes
automatic. If an appeal is made,
but no hearing is arranged
within the 10=day period, the
cited school or athlete will be
restored to eligibility until the
case is heard.
The change of Commissioner
authority, it was explained, was
made because the former investi-
gative process was weighty and
slow, with the Commissioner often
handicapped by lack of formal
outside charges and long delays
in hearings.
*, * *
AN ATHLETE, rather than a
school, can be guilty of violating
the subsidization ban by accept-
ing "under the table" 'gratuities
from outside sources, unknown to
the school.
Under the new set-up Wilson
can slap down over-ambitious
coaching staff members. If any
such staff member is found guilty
of illegal recruiting,. Wilson can
deny him and all other staff mem-
bers in the same sport the privil-
ege to contact prospective stu-
dents, through campus visits or
other legal manner, for a one-year
period.I
The athletic directors, in the
third day of the winter meeting,
also awarded the 1951 conference
tennis meet to Northwestern Uni-
versity May 24-25-26.

Gymnastic
Maize Squad
Downs Blue
The second intrasquad gymnas-
tics meet of the season, held Fri-
day in the small gymnasium of
the Intramural Building, clearly
indicated that the Michigan gym-
nasts need a great deal of prac-
tice before the regular season be-
gins in February.
Although misses and broken
routines were the rule rather than
the exception, several individuals
performed well. The Maize team
easily defeated their Blue rivals
by a 572 to 361/2 score.
ED BUCHANAN, captain of the
gymnastics team, worked well on
the trampoline, capturing an un-
disputed first place in that event.
Other repeat winners from
last week's meet were Duncan
Erley in the tumbling contest,
Pete Barthell on the parallel
bars and Mary Johnson] high
bar. Barthell also won the side
horse event, and John Mills
took first place honors on the
flying rings.
Top honors of the day again
went to Barthell.

By JIM-PARKER
In about two and a half hours
at the Coliseum Fridayh night, the
future of the Michigan hockey
squad toojk on a considerably
brighter outlook. '
One of the main factors in this
optimistic appraisal was the per-
formances turned in by sophomores
starting their first game in a
Maize and Blue uniform.
,, * * *
PARTICULARLY impressive was
John McKennell, a red-headed
speedster from Toronto, Ontario.
If ever there was a case of
putting the "old college try" in-
to a hockey game, McKennel was
a perfect example. On Michigan
ice he fought with the ferocity
of a caged Wolverine to keep the
Detroit forwards from getting an
open shot on goal, even to the
point of hurling himself on the
puck to stop a shot.
Offensively, McKennell display-
ed an effective passing and play-
'making style, but the big honors
in that department go to Sopho-
more John Matchefts who flashed
the red light twice during the
evening.

HIS FIRST GOAL came when
the Wolverine offense needed a
boost in the worst way. Detroit
had poured out to an early 2-0
lead and it wasn't until 12:32 .of
the first period that Matchefts
rung the bell for Michgan.
That started the puck rolling
and the Wolverines finished the
stanza with a lead (3-2) that
they never gave up.
Matcheft's second goal was a
well executed bit of coniivery be-
tween Neil Celley who passed from
behind the goal to Matchefts and
Michigan's sixth goal.
*. * *
THE OTHER first year man to
figure in the scoring was Alex Mc-
Clellan who netted Michigan's
eighth and final goal after takng
a pass from Earl Keyes and fin-
ishing off on a solo sortie.
Keyes incidentally came up
with what was probably the
scoring gem of the evening when
he intercepted an Auto Club pass
and, deflecting the puck off the
boards onto center ice, pounced
upon it and waltzed off on a
breakaway that produced the
Maize and Blue's fqurth goal.
Another major factor in the suc-
cess of the Wolverines' 1950-51
debut was the way Hal Downes re-
sponded to the task of keeising
the Michigan goal.
Before the game, Downes was
very obviously a worried young
man.
And then the despair that he
must have felt when the first two
Detroit shots on him went through
for goals; but it didn't make
Downes give up.
Instead he rose to the occasion,
making a comeback that instilled
a feeling of respect for the sandy
haired senior in his first starting
role.

sophomores Brighten ,
'M's' Hockey Outlook

i

NO TROUBLE
FINDING THE RIGHT GIFT
' AT STAEB &, DAY
Just cast your eyes over this list and see how easy it is to
make a gift selection at Staeb and Day's. Gifts which bear
the Staeb and Day hallmark of quality and distinction.
Suits Sweaters
Sport Coats Hanson Gloves
Overcoats Wool and Silk Scarves
Topcoats Van Heusen Shirts and
Raincoats Pajamas
Mallory Hats Stradivari Sport Shirts
McGregor Sportswear in Gabardine, Rayon,
Ripon Slipper Sax and Cord
Tip e cks Belts and Suspenders
Trouser Racks Wembley Neckwear
oosandRao sInterwoven Hosiery
WoolHand Rayon Robes Hickok Jewelry
H andkerchiefs and Billfolds
OPEN WEDNESDAY NITE,. DEC. 20 TILL 9:00
ALL GIFTS APPROPRIATELY BOXED
THE DOWNTOWN STORE FOR MICHIGAN. MEN
"W21e Serve to Serve Again,
309 SOUTH MAIN STREET

DAILY;
OFFICIAL '
BULLETIN '
(Continued on Page 2)3
Exhibitions
Museum of Art, Alumni Memori-
al Hall. Double Exhibition:. Work
in Progress in Michigan; Water
Colors and Drawings from the
Newberry collection; through De-
cember 31. Galleries open to the
public, weekdays 9-5, Sundays 2-5.
Events Today
Canterbury Club: 9 a.m., Holy
Communion followed by Student
Breakfast. 5 p.m., Evening Prayer
followed by supper and meeting;
the GreekbOrthodox student group
will be our guests.
Roger Williams Guild: 10 a.m.,
Bible Study Class meets in Guild
House. 2 p.m., Meet at Guild House
to attend "Messiah" as a group.
We will return to the Guild House
following this for supper and fel-
lowship.
Congregational, Disciple, Evan-
gelical and Reformed Guild: 6 p.m.,
Supper at Memorial Christian
Church, followed by an address by
Rev. Joseph M. Smith, Minister of
Memorial Christian Church, and
former missionary to China, on
Communism in present-day China.
Gamma Delta, Lutherans Student
Club: 5:30 p.m., Supper program;
sound colored movie: "Beyond Our
Own."
Lutheran Student Asosciation:
5:30 p.m., meeting at Zion Parish
Hall. Speaker: Theodore Mark-
wood, Toledo, Ohio. "A Layman's
Responsibility to the Church."
Michigan Christian Fellowship:
4 p.m., Lane Hall (Fireside Room).
Rev. William Swets, Pastor of the
Olivet Reformed Church, Grand
Rapids, will speak on the'subject:
"The Messiah."
Wesleyan Fellowship: 9:30 a.m.,
Seminar and Breakfast in the Pine
Room. 5:30 p.m., Supper; 6:30 p.
m., Program. Subject: "A Christ-
ian Student Faces Campus Life,"
by Rev. H. L. Pickerill.
Hillel: Beginning of Construc-

V. V 1X. aV u ~ aa a v j
Live Jam Session, 8 p.m., League.
No admission charge.
Alpha Chapter of Sigma Alpha
Iota, Professional Music Frater-
nity for Women, will present its
annual Christmas Candlelight
Service at the First Presbyterian
Church at 8 p.m. The public is
invited.
Inter-Arts Union: Meeting, 2
p.m., League. Everyone invited.
Graduate Outing Club: Hiking
or Tobogganing. Meet, 2:15 p.m.,
Outing Club room, Rackham. New-
comers welcome.
Marching Band Members: First
rehearsal, 2:30-5:30 p.m., at the
Intramural Building, without in-
struments.
Phi Iota Alpha, Latin-American
Fraternity: Movies: "Peru, Land of
the Incas." Informative discussign.
2 p.m., Room 3A, Union. Public
invited.
eoming Events
Canterbury Club meets at Lane
Hall, 7:30 p.m., Mon., Dec. 11.
Michigan Actuarial Club: Or-
ganizational meetings Tues., Dec.
(Continued on Page 4)

I

A FINE

90

11.1

tion ceremony for the new Hillel
Foundation, 3 p.m., Lane Hall.
Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld, National
Director of Hillel, will make the
dedicatory address. Following the
Lane Hall ceremony, an inspection
of progress. and special outdoor
Chanukah dedication at the site of
the new building, 1429 Hill, 5 p.m.
Everyone is invited.
Gilbert & Sullivan: Dress re-
hearsal, 6:30 p.m., Pattengill Audi-
tcrium. All men meet in the base-
ment of the Journalism Building
6 p.m.
U. of M Hot Record Society:

AT A NEW LOW PRICE
:o
Only
.$ /5'for This Trustworthy
New 17-Jewel
CLINTOIN
Stainless steel case
-/- black figure
/dial. 17 jewels.
HALLERS
JEWELERS
717 North University

a~J

MICHIGAN
CALENDAR

111

and

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MICHIGAN

AT THE CAMPUS BO

OTERY

DATE
BOOK

.THE VERY FINEST IN SHOES
AND SLIPPERS FOR MEN
AND WOMEN AT FORMER PRICES

THE MICHIGAN CALENDAR
including 12 magnificent photographs of
the Campus which will serve as fine re-
membrances in your scrap book....$1.50
THE MICHIGAN DATE BOOK
including a complete calendar of events
for 1951 and room for notes for each

I

I

l

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1111

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