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December 03, 1950 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGNETGIrlr

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 3,

CAUSTIC CONDUCTOR: ta, x,:vk
Personal Legend Built3\
Around Thomas Beecham ,jC-

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By LEONARD GREENBAUM
Sir Thomas Beecham, knight,
owner of one of England's largest
medicinal industries and conduc-
tor of the Royal Philharmonic Or-
chestra of London, will make his
Ann Arbor debut at 8:30 p.m. to-
day.
The caustic wit of the conductor,
his unorthodox personality and his,
disdain for social propriety have
built up a wealth of personal le-
gend around the 71 year old Beec-
ham.
BEECHAM thinks little of star-
ing at a late arrival coming down
the aisle and focusing the atten-
tion of both the orchestra and the
audience on the hapless individual.
And numerous times he has asked
people conversing during a per-
formance to "Shut up."
Noted for violent gestures
'U' Alaskans
Disagree on
Statehood
Two Alaskan citizens at the Un-
iversity expressed divergent views
on the fate of the Alaskan State-
hood bill yesterday.
{ Constance Davis, Spec., of Ju-
neau, feels that statehood would
be beneficial at this time.
"THE SUDDEN change from
federal to state governmental of-j
fices might cause some trouble for
a while," she said, "but in the long
run it would do more good than
damage."
"Alaska could develop faster .
as a state," she maintained.
"Most people in the territory are
willing to work hard to develop
the country," she said.
An opposite viewpoint was put
forth by Mrs. Fred'Niemann, also
of Juneau, who is a secretary in
the Institute for Social Research.
* s *
"ALASKA has to grow up a good
deal more before we can be sure
what status is best for it," she
argued.
"For one thing, there is
a large transient population. It
would leave the comparatively
few stable settlers with the bur-
den of taxes."
Poor communications also worry
Mrs. Niemann. "Communications
are very bad now," she said. "They
have to be improved a great deal
before Alaska will be able to com-
pete equally with the states."

I I

while conducting, Sir Thomas
has occassionally fallen off the
podium. "Podiums," he remark-
ed after one fall, "are expressly
designed as part of a conspiracy
against conductors."
And at a Carnegie Hall conceri
several years ago he reached such
a pitch of artistic exuberance
that he broke his suspenders and
had to leave the stage holding ur
his pants with his hands.
Part of Beecham's air of inde-
pendence stems from his being one
of England's richest men. The
$150,000,000 fortune amassed by
his ancestors through the inven-
tion and sale of England's mosi
p o p u 1 a r laxative, "Beecham's
Pills," has placed him in a unique
position among musicians.
HIS FATHER, Sir Joseph, whc
had a genius for advertising and
a flair for music issued the famous
hymn book which contained the
quartrain:
"Hark the heraldaangels sing
Beecham's Pills are Just the
thing
Peace on Earth and mercy
mild
Two for man and one for
child."
And when Sir Thomas organized
his first symphony orchestra at
the age of 20, it was dubbed by
friends the "Pilharmonic."
BEECHAM, however, has no ac-
tive interest in the pill company,
though he does receive part of hi
income from it.
The serious side 'of Beecham
should not be deemphasized. He
has organized, financed, con-
s t r u c t e d and propagandized
more orchestras, opera houses
and other musical activities than
almost any individual alive to-
day.
He also introduced to England
the works of such contemporar3
composers as Delius, Richard
Strauss and Sibelius.
But his lighter side keeps crop-
ping up into the news. When at a
party someone remarked that Si-
belius had once called him the
greatest living conductor, Sir Tho-
mas chimed in with "Hear!. Hear!"
As to his retorts to audiences
Beecham remarked. "There is
something about a large gathering
that brings out my basest in-
stincts. Before a crowd of 1,000,
I am malicious. Before 5,000, I
am positively evil, and, facing a
crowd of 10,000, I am compelled
to say the most abominable
things."
What he will say to the capa-
city audience at Hill Auditorium
tonight remains to be seen.

t
I2
e
T
er

DIRECTOR MERRILL MCCLATCHEY FLAGS "STAND B!"
This is one of the many cues that the radio director uses as he
signals in the actors, sound effects, and music. Acting as a "con-
ductor" he waves to the actors telling them to talk louder or softer
and to the sound effects man telling him to regulate his effect.
The running of the entire show rests on his shoulders. Instruc-
tor in the speech department, McClatchey teaches radio direct-
ing and writing. He directs all the Angell Hall Playhouse shos.

FULL PRODUCTION LINE-UP OF CAST IN ACTION

*

*

*

AglalPlayhouse ired .Weekly
Speech Department's Rad how ers
Chance for Broadcasting Experience

Angell Hall Playhouse Script
Tuesday, Nov. 28, 1950
"Two Cowgirls from Boston"
By Gene Fromherz
Director: Merrill McClatchey
Casting Director: Betty Fuller

n

h

Ju~tWhat 9SZWonhted!
Gifts from "KESSEL'S" are designed to please.
Lots of pretty things, luxury things, heavenly things
- at prices you want to pay.

>3 A
-I -
4

BLOUSES
AFTER-5 BLOUSE of lame
satin or crepe.
TAILORED blouses in 'light,
dark shades and white.
VERSATILE wool jerseys in
plain, striped or heather
shades.
LINGERIE
SLIPS-tailored or dressy-"
strapless of rayon, crepe, or
nylon.
GOWNS-of rayon, crepe,
sheer white-black colors.
ROBES-of corduroy, wool
flannel, quilted, rayon, cot-
ton.
BED JACKETS-PAJAMAS.
SWEATERS
In luxurious pohtels and de-
finite colors of cashmere,
zeplyn botany, wool and ny.
lon, slipover or cardigan.
SCARFS
Head and neck scarfs of
wool or pure silk.
(and many other items
to choose from)

SOUND: GUN SHOTS
IN DISTANCE
LYDIA: (Excitedly) What in the
world is'that? Your own private
rodeo?
BEN: (Thick Western accent)
Tha's Joe's voice. He must a'-
caught thet guy outside. What'd
ah do with mah gun?
LYDIA: Over there leaning on the
sofa. Got an extra one for me?
BEN: No, you use thet poker near
th' fireplace.
LYDIA: Swell . . . . Now this is
more like the West!
MUSIC: SHORT WESTERN
BRIDGE
ANNCR: It's Angell Hall Play-
house time. In tonight's drama-
tic presentation we take you out
west with Two Cowgirls From
Boston !
MUSIC: WESTERN TYPE
UP AND UNDER
ANNCR: Years ago Horace Greeley
said "Go west young man." To-
night the Angell Hall Playhouse
follows his advice and takes you
out to the wild and woolly west
with the Campbells of Boston in
an original radio farce by Gene
Fromherz.
This is another in a series of
radio dramas on the Angell Hall
Playhouse presented every week
at this time by the University
of Michigan speech department.
Listen now as the Angell Hall
Playhouse brings you ... .
TWO COWGIRLS
FROM BOSTON
MUSIC: UP AND OUT
AT CURTAIN
* * *
THE ANGELL HALL Playhouse
is a half-hour dramatic pro-
gram written, acted and produced
by the radio students in the
speech department.
It is heard at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday
over WUOM and is rebroadcast at
8:30 p.m. Thursday over WHRV.
Originated in 1948 by Prof. Gar-
net R. Garrison, it is designed to
give radio students an opportunity
to hear their work performed. In
addition it presents outstanding
literary works contributed by oth-
er campus writers.
Rehearsal begins for the
broadcast on Friday one week
before the show is to be aired.
Two hours on Friday and anoth-
er full dress rehearsal on Tues-
day of the broadcast day com-
pletes the schedule.
The entire company then re-
mains to hear the show rebroad-
cast in order to study the final
results, make comments and cri-
ticisms on the performances and
take notes for future productions.
"The music for the Playhouse
is selected from mood music bridg-
es and classics in our library,"
Prof. Garrison explained. "Some-
times we do use original music,
though."
*a S
THE SOUND EFFECTS used on

DOREEN CAMPBELL AND BETTY FULLER CHECK NOTES

are later played back, Prof.
Garrison said.
"The control room where the
tape recorder is located, is the
nerve center of our studios and is
the master control on which our
very broadcasting existence de-
pends," he said.
* * *
"THE ANGELL HALL Play-
house is considered our top radio
dramatic show, but we have stu-
dents from every school on the
campus contributing their work.
Hopwood winners Al Slote, Vance
Simonds, Josh Greenfeld, and SOl
Gottlieb have all added their writ-
ings and we encourage all quali-
fied juniors and seniors to sign up

for radio writing classes," Prof.
Garrison added.
Because the Angell Hall Play-
house presents an opportunity
for students to learn actual
writing and broadcasting, it is
invaluable experience for those
who are interested in the radio
dramatics field, he said.
"We make sure that students
gain a well-rounded experience in
all phases of producing a radio
show. Every weke they are assign-
ed different jobs. One week a stu-
dent may handle sound effects
and the next week, the musical
bridges. In this way, they are
made aware of the need for split-
second cooperation."

DIANE FAULK ADDS INCHES

FRED REMLEY ADJUSTS TAPE RECORDER

A
DAILY'
PHOTO
FEATURE
Story by
Mary Letsis
Photographs by
Jack Bergstrom

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