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November 29, 1950 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-29

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 29, 1950

I I ______________________________________________________________________________ I

ARMOR PLUJS AMOfUR:

Caesar and Cleopatra'To Open Tonight

By WENDY OWEN
Sporting costumes from the ori-
g i n a l Broadway production
the s p e e c h department's of-
offering of "Caesar and Cleopa-
tra" will open at 8 p.m. today in
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Prof. Hugh Z. Norton, who is
directing the Shaw drama, ob-
tained the costumes via a New
York middleman who contacted
the costume house which had
bought them after the New York
production closed.
* * *
INCLUDED IN the gala array
are authentic Roman helmets,
heavily padded breastplates for
the Roman army officers, gold-
embroidered togas and realistic
Roman tunics. Many of the cos-
tumes were taken completely
apart in the play production cos-
tume shop and rebuilt for the
students who will wear them to-
night through Saturday.
The breast-plates and 'bronze'
armor were created by the New
York costumer from heavy duty
muslin and gilded to give them
an authentic metallic sheen. All
the Roman uniforms are heavily
padded, in order to better show
the burly Roman officers who
luxuriated in the Alexandrian
court of Cleopatra, and grew fat
and lazy on the enormous court
banquets.
TO BRIDGE the time between
scenes, Prof. Norton commissioned
William D. Peterson to compose
original music With the proper
Egyptian air. A recorded orches-
tration of this work, directed by
Grant Beglarian, Grad., will be
heard at the show.
Caesar, the famous Roman em-
peror, will be played by John Sar-
gent, Grad. and opposite him, as
the coyly naive Cleopatra will be
Marilyn Begole, Grad.
Sargent is no stranger to Ann
Arbor audiences, having appeared
in such dramas as Dr. Faustus
and King Lear. Miss Begole was
last seen as Cordelia in King Lear.
The two will be assisted by Du-
ane Gotschall, Irene Kelley, Char-
les Olson, Nafe Katter, Jerome
Lepard and Dennis Morley.
Tickets for the Egyptian comedy
will be ont sale at the Mendelssohn
box-office, open daily from 10 a.-
m. to 8 p.m. Special student rates
will be offered today and tomor-
row.

* .:' *

-Daily-Roger Reinke
EMPEROR MEETS EMPRESS-Caesar, played by John Sargent,
Grad. explains a perfectly evident point to young Cleopatra, Mari-
lyn Begole, Grad. as the two rehearse for the speech department
production of George Bernard Shaw's classic comedy, "Caesar and
Cleopatra."
'U' Awarded Grant of $48,®00
By Carnegie Corporation

The University has been award-
ed grant of $48,4000 from the
Carnegie Corporation of New
York City, according to President
Alexander G. Ruthven.
The grant will be used to es-
tablish four post-doctoral re-
search fellowships which will be
offered by the Survey Research
Center, the economics and poli-
tical science departments and the
Institute of Public Administration,
President Ruthven said.
* * *
THE FELLOWSHIPS will be
awarded to furtrer research in
fields of common interest between

economics, political science, psy-
chology, sociology and public ad-
ministration, according to Prof.
Angus Campbell, director of the
Survey Research Center.
They will carry a remuneration
of $5,000 a year with an addition-
al allowance of $1,000 provided to
each fellow for computational
a n d clerical expenses, Prof.
Campbell added.
He noted that two fellowships
in economics have already been
established at the Center as the

U.S. College
Enrollments
Show Drop
By CAL SAMRA
American colleges and universi-
ties in toto have shown a marked
decrease in enrollment this fall,
according to the annual survey of
The New York Times.
According to the figures collect-
ed by The Times from more
than 18,000 institutions of higher
learning in this country, student
enrollment was 2,344,509-a drop
of 187,809 from last year's record
high.
SEVERAL salient factors have
.influenced this decline, according
to Prof. Algo D. Henderson of the
School of Education.
1. The decline in the number of
veterans enrolling in the nation's
colleges and universities.
2. The drafting of an increasing
number of students.
3. The effect of the depression
of the early thirties, in which the
national birthrate dropped. At the
moment this has resulted in a
dearth in the number of high
school students.
"The trend downward will prob-
ably continue for a while," Prof.
Henderson added, but he thought
that the trend would eventually be
reversed.
*, * *
THESE DECREASES have left
their mark on the nation's cam-
puses. This fall one out of every
four college students is a war vete-
ran; two years ago one out of ev-
ery two were ex-service men. The
lack of veterans enrolling in fresh-
man classes gives the tip-off as
to what is to come. A number of
colleges reported that the supply
of new veterans has dwindled to
the vanishing point.
While 80 per cent of the col-
leges and universities declared
that they were prepared to ad-
mit more students this fall if
they had applied, they also re-
ported that they lack sufficient
facilities for their existing stu-
dents.
This is probably the reason why
the colleges put as their foremost
need the construction of new build-.
ings and have embarked upon a
vast expansion program. Seventy-
five per cent of all the colleges and
universities have made plans for
building programs, according to
the report.
.* *
PROBABLY because of the en-
rollment drop, the colleges and un-
iversities reported that they are
now able to get nearly all the qual-
ified faculty members they need.
In all, 86.5 per cent answered "yes"
on the question of whether they
were getting a sufficient number of
professors. This is significant be-
cause only a year ago the colleges
were suffering from an acute
shortage of qualified instructors.
From a fiscal standpoint,
many of the institutions report-
ed that they were in financial
trouble. Actually, The Times re-
ported that 22 per cent of all
the institutions of higher learn-
ing were operating on a deficit.
"One unfortunate effect of the
financial troubles is already tak-
ing place," the report explained.
"Standards are being lowered. Ser-
vices have been cut on a number
of campuses. Faculty members
have not been replaced. Needed
repairs are left undone."
Consequently, it is not surpris-
ing that the annual tuition fee for
the undergraduate student, which
this fall averaged $281, is an in-

crease over the $276 fee for last
year and the $187 in 1941-42. But
most of the colleges and univer-
sities reported that they were not
planning to increase their tuition
fees, but were looking for revenue
elsewhere.
Estep To Speak
Prof. Samuel Estep of the Law
School will speak on "The Consti-
tutionality of the McCarran Act"
at a meeting of Students for Dem-
ocratic Action at 7:30 p.m. today
in Rm. 3B in the Union.

a seven-loot steel. mesn and
barbed-wire fence around the 4,-
000 acre plot 14 miles west of Ann
Arbor.
* * *
THE LAND has been bought up
piecemeal over the past year or so.
Farmers sold their property for
reputedly fantastic sums. When
they moved out their homes were
boarded up or razed and the land
lay idle.
Negotiations were carried on
by the late George Burke, Sr.,
Ann Arbor attorney, and John
H. Hanna, a Detroit real estate
agent. Their client remains a
secret to this day.
It has been reported that Han-
na has spent $750,000 in acquir-
ing the farm land. He has.moved

bought the property for the
Chrysler Corporation to use as a
proving ground. But this is entire-
ly without confirmation.
Other suggestions range from
an auto speedway to a nudist
colony.
These possibilities have kept
Chelsea residents speculating for
months. At ene time they pro-
tested closing of roads in the area
in an attempt to force Hanna and
Burke to bring their client out
into the open.
But Burke would only say that
the persons interested in the pro-
ject are "splendid individuals who
have a definite sense of respon-
sibility to the community."
In the meantime the fence goes
up. And the mystery deepens.

II

CONSTRUCTION CREW-Students of the Finland Institute of
Technology do their own hod-carrying and bricklaying in the con-
struction of their new campus in Helsinki. Lack of housing and
educational facilities prompted the students to undertake the pro-
ject.
* * * *
Finnish Students Tell of
Free Scholastic Sy*s tem

1{

By LEONARD GREENBAUM
Students at the Finland Insti-
tute of Technology don't have to
worry about final exam schedules
or getting to laboratories on time.
According to Institute graduates
Vilkko Virkkala and Yrjo Malkki
who performed with the Polytech
Chorus of Finland at Hill Audi-
torium last night, Finnish stu-
dents enjoy greater scholastic
freedom than American students.
- * * *
WHEN THE CHORUS returns
home next month they will be un-
der no pressure to make up work
lost during their current five
month tour of the United States
and Canada.
The novel situation is due to
the educational requirements of
universities in Finland. Students
are allowed to choose their own
time for both studying and ex-
aminaitons. Their laboratories
are open 12 hours a day and
may be used at the student's
convenience. The four and a
half to five years prescribed for
securing a degree is extendable
without any penalties.
According to Virkkala and Mal-
kki few Finnish students go to
the universities for a liberal arts
education but rather point them-
selves toward some definite pro-
fession.
* **
A LIBERAL ARTS education is
primarily attained in the "learn-
ing school," a cross between the
high school and a junior college.
After completing their gener-
al education in the "learning
school" students take examina-

tions that qualify them for a
student degree and entrance to
any university.
One of the major difficulties
facing Finland's students, Virk-
kala noted, is not academic but
economic. The lack of adequate
housing caused many students to
live in bomb shelters while others,
not able to find even this type of
roof returned to the country and
'postponed their education.
* * *
TO REMEDY the situation stu-
dents at the Finland Institute of
Technology are constructing a
modern university campus with
dormitories, educational and re-
creational facilities. In order to
save expenses the students per-
form a major part of the menial
labor from uprooting trees to car-
rying a hod.
But inadequate housing isn't
the only shortage facing the In-
stitute's students. They are lack-
ing technical facilities for re-
search, and their libraries were
destroyed by fire during the war.
The bird's eye view of Ameri-
can colleges and universities that
they have acquired on their pre-
sent tour drew only envious ad-
miration for the extensive equip-
ment American schools possess.
Ice Rink Closes
A mechanical breakdown in the
Coliseum forced a temporary shut-
down of the ice rink last night.
However, Harry C. Kaseberg,
rink manager, indicated yesterday
that repairs would be completed
today or tomorrow.

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NEW FOUNTAIN
MANAGEMENT
presents an
ICE CREAM
FESTIVAL
Tru Dec. 2nd

Student Builders

i

New Fence To Surround
Chelsea Mystery Project
By BOB KEITH 25 families from the area and torn
Chelsea's mysterious land area down 18 houses and barns.
is being further isolated from cur- * * *
ious townsfolk this week. WHAT THE LAND will be used
Worknien are preparing t efor is unknown. The most persis-
Worme ar pepain toercttant rumor has it than Hanna

I

TWO
SODAS or

SUNDAES
PRICE OF ONE, PLUS

c

result of a previous grant
Carnegie.

from

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//4
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It's
Chirstmas Time
at
J De MILLER'S
Try our BIG
44c Lunch Today!
e
MILLER'S CAFETERIA
211 South State

'Ensian Extends
Proof Deadine
The 'Ensian has extended the
graduate-senior proof deadline in-
definitely, according to Joe Hein-
lein, '53, promotions manager.
"'Indefinitely' means the next
few days," Heinlein said. "400
proofs still remain out."
Office hours in the Student
Publications Bldg. will continue
from'9 to 12 noon, 1 to 5 p.m.

I

i

ii*

{i}:i ; ,:"+: irs} .:::: i

i-

TONIGHT 8:30 P.M.
"THE TRUTH ABOUT THE HYDROGEN BOMB"
LI WHO has known about the Hydrogen Bomb for years, but
only now is he permitted to tell the American people about it.
WHO wants the American people to judge the Hydrogen Bomb
on the facts and make up their own minds about it.
WHO is truly a magnificent speaker, describing the Hydrogen
Bomb with profound clarity in an authoritative, comprehensible
manner.
IWILLIAM LAURENCE
Science Reporter, N.Y. Times
Tickets $1.50 - $1.20 - 60c (tax incl.)
Box Office Open Today, 10:00 A.M. - 8:30 P.M.
1950-51 LECTURE COURSE
H IL L A UDITOR IUM
WILLIAM LAURENCE H

K~4o KvIOare qute,s~the erne~
Northw

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