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November 28, 1950 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-28

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E six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 28: 1950

SIX TUESDAY, NOVEMBER ~8, 1950

REPORTER SPEAKS:
Laurence To Deliver Talk
On Hydrogen Bomb at Hill

William Laurence, the only
newspaper man in history to re-
ceive the Pulitzer Prize twice for
reporting, will deliver a lecture en-
titled "The Truth About the Hy-
drogen Bomb' at 8 p.m., tomorrow
in Hill Auditorium.
His address will be the fourth
in the current Oratorical Lecture
Series.
* * *
AS SCIENCE Reporter of the
New York Times since 1930, Lau-
rence's career reached its peak in
1945 when the War Department
chose him to prepare the atomic
bomb story for the public.
In order to get a complete and
accurate account of the secret,
he was a visitor at the Los Ala-

fullIbacks

mos, New Mexico bomb labora-
tory and witnessed the test
bombing on July 16 in the New
Mexico desert.
Before returning to the Times
office, Laurence flew with the air-
men who dropped the world shak-
ing bomb on Nagasaki and then
was present when the dangers of
radio-activity were tested at the
New Mexico testing ground.
AFTER FINISHING this assign-
ment, Laurence began a series of
articles on the development and
use of the atomic bomb. He then
turned to a study of the hydrogen
bomb and has now a wealth of ma-
terial on the subject.
In 1949 Laurence received the
award for the best newspaper re-
porting on medical science and
public health for his articles on
the development of cortisone and
ACTH.
Oddly enough it took a job with
a florist to start Laurence off in
college and then go on to become
a world famous reporter. While
delivering a funeral wreath in
Cambridge, Mass., he passed Har-
vard University and was determin-
ed to study there. After earning
money for the tuition he enrolled
as a full time student.
Upon graduation Laurence was
awarded the distinction of cum
laude in philosophy. After school
he turned to free lance writing
and then reporting.
Tickets for the lecture are on
sale at the Hill Auditorium box of-
fice. They are priced at $1.50, $1.20
and $.60.
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

Conference
WillDiscuss
Union Plans
The quest for closer cooperation
between the Union and campus ac-
tivities will get a new push this
week with Saturday's Regional
Conference of College Unions.
The problem of the Union's re-
juvenation has currently been re-
ceiving close attention from the
Union's newly-established Liason
Committee, composed of a nurmber
of campus leaders.
* * *
THE CONFERENCE, according
to Dade Connell, '53, of the Union's
publicity staff, may produce some
pertinent advice on the extension
of certain Union privileges to co-
eds. This proposal aroused con-
siderable controversy when it was
recently brought up before the
Liason Committee.
Many of the schools partici-
pating in the conference, Con-
nell pointed out, have coeduca-
tional student centers. But these,
he added, usually have no coun-
terpart of our League.
Top priority on the conference
agenda, according to John Kathe,
'52, Union conference host,"will be
given to a discussion of better in-
tegration of campus groups with
college union facilities.
3 * '*,
"WHAT WE WANT to find out,"
Kathe said, "is how other cam-
puses are handling our common
problems and whether we can
make good use of their solutions to
them."
The conference is the second
such regional meeting. The first,
held at Michigan State last year,
was very successful, he said.
Attending the conference will be
representatives from Michigan
State, Western Michigan, Univer-
sity of Detroit, and Michigan State
Normal College.
MARCH ON, MARCH OP

EGYPTIAN ROMANCE:
Department of Speech
To Give Shaw Comedy

PIPE
2$ TOBACC
,m c
fu. ble fo
H c: .1 0 .v0

-Daily-Roger Reinixe
YOU REALLY COULD, TOO-A hero 'once more after his team's upset victory over Ohio State,
Head Coach Bennie Oosterbaan addresses a few calm words of appreciation to a crowd of 500
students which gathered at the Union to show Mi chigan's Big Ten champions and Rose Bowl nomi-
nees just what, they thought of them. On his right, three members of the team wait their turns at
the microphone: Fullback Don Dufek, who sus pects his turn is next, gazes modestly at the
ground; Tackle Bill Ohlenroth smiles at the thou ght of warm California weather; and halfback
Chuck Ortmann bites his tongue trying to reme mber his speech.
R* * * * * * '*
Wolveries Receie Rosy Welcome

By DAVE THOMAS
Daily Feature Editor
Yesterday was a big day for the
lads who brought back a surprise
Big Ten championship and Rose
Bowl invitation from snow-bound
Columbus.
All day long the players received
smiles on the diag and congratula-
tions in their classes.
* * *
THE STUDENT Legislature and
Wolverine Club even threw them
an "appreciation" rally with roses,

HAYES HAS LEARNED A LOT OF NEW HOLDS
SINCE HE STARTED USING VITALIS!)
You'll find gals easy to hold on to -if you use your head -
and "Live-Action" Vitalis care. Tackle that mop of yours with
the famous "60-Second Workout." 50 seconds' scalp massage (feel
the difference!).. . 10 seconds to comb (and will the gals see the
difference!) ...You'll look neat and natural. Bye-bye loose flaky
dandruff and dryness, too. So get a hold on Vitalis - buy it at
any drufstore or barber shop.
and the
A PRODU CT o "60-Second Workout"
BRISTOL-MYERS

loud speakers and- all the trim-
mings.
Cheer leaders and an off-key
band worked hard to drum up a
crowd. By noon they had suc-
ceeded in luring about 500 stu-
dents to the steps of the Union
where a group of coeds rushed
forward to pin roses on the,
heroes of the hour.
Then followed some speeches
and a bit of cheering. After which
a chant went up for the coaches
who were suspected of having
something to do with the victory.
On a tip from Mrs. Oosterbaan
across the street, they were all
discovered lurking behind a Union
lamp post and brought forward to
crys of "We Want Bennie."
. . *
BENNIE and the rest said a few
good words for the team.
That is, all except line coach J.
T. White, who for once was struck
speechless.. As the crowd applaud-
ed the silent performance, Bennie
was heard to murmur, "Wonder-
ful, J. T., wonderful." The other

coaches smiled and nudged each
other. They had already spoken.
The players said a few good
words for the coaches.
They said some other things
also: ,
Don Peterson came out in favor,
of more holidays, revealing that he
had perhaps cut his morning
classes.
-Tom Johnson, who played a
full 60 minutes against OSU and
is fond of understatement, ad-
mitted that "everything had
turned out all right."
Bill Ohlenroth made the mis-
take of admitting that he was a
speech major and then dragged
out a weary but timely metaphor
to prove it: "I guess Bennie found
the right mortar with which to
patch the crumbling empire."
Everyone seemed to enjoy them-
selves. One transfer student had
a' complaint, however. "This sure
isn't like old MSC," he said.
"You're right, it isn't," someone
agreed.

"Although I was 44 or there-
abouts when I wrote the play, I
think I was a trifle young for the
job; but it was not bad for a ju-
venile effort."
So said George Bernard Shaw
when he once criticized his come-
dy "Caesar and Cleopatra."
FOR ITS third production of the
season, the Speech Department
will present this Shaw comedy at
8 p.m., tomorrow through - ur-
day at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre. ,
Directed by Prof. Hygh Nor-
ton, the play depicts Caesar's
love for Cleopatra from his ar-
rival in Egypt until his depart-
ure for Rome.
In one of his best character por-
trayals, Shaw presents Cleopatra in
a manner completely different
than Shakespeare's "Anthony and
Cleopatra." He treats her at first,
as a young and innocent sovereign
and then shows how, through Cae-
sar's teaching, she became the
great and merciless queen she is
believed to have been,
The first presentation of the
play was given in the United
States in 1906, but Shaw did not
attend. Last year the play was
done on Broadway with Cedric
Harwicke and Lilli Palmer-in the
title roles. It was .a critical and
box office success. After the run
of the play, Harwicke appeared
here for the 1950 Ann Arbor
Drama Season. He played in an-
other Shaw comedy, "Getting
Married."
Tickets for the production are
now on sale at the box office of
the Lydia Mendelssohn. They are
Galen Drive
BeginsFriday.
Galens will assume their tradi-
tional, strategic positions around
the campus Friday and Saturday
when they swing into their 24th
annual Tag Day Drive.
The goal for the two day drive
by the medical honorary and ser-
vice group has been set at $5,000
according to Don Griffith, '51M,
chairman.
All money collected will be used
for th~e annual Christmnas Party
for the children in the University
Hospital and to support the Ga-
len Shop. The Shop, which oper-
ates the year around, provides a
chance for the hospitalized child-
ren to spend time working with
wood, leather, weaving looms and
other activities.
Traditional buckets and posters
will be manned during the drive
by the 24 members of Galens.

priced at $1.20, $.90, and $.60. Spe-
cial student rates at $.60 are avail-
able for tomorrow's and Thursday's
performances.
1 01
Opportunity
nimtdI
For men of high caliber and
university training, Douglas
offers limitless opportunity.
Today, as for the past thirty
years, our future depends on
men who can continue to
help pioneer in the field of
aeronautics.
University and college gradu.
I ates have made important con-
tributions to our progress, and
have found Douglas a good
I place to work.
I As we push forward the
C development of aircraft,
' guided missiles, and special
classified projects for the
Government, we shall always
be interested in men trained
as aeronautical, mechani-
cal, electrical and civil
engineers ... physicists...
and mathematicians.
DOUCLAS AIRCRAFT
COMPANY, INC.
SANTA MONICA,
CALIFORNIA

Michigan and 'Pushes'
Through Ohio lizzard
A broken-down bus, freezing With no other choice open to
temperatures, and treacherous them, about 50 bandsmen yen-
roads last Saturday transformed tured out into the storm, planted
Michigan's nationally famous their spats-covered feet into the
Marching Band into a pushing frozen ground behind the bus as
band, firmly as was possible, and heaved,
When 'the 140 members began tugged, and pushed for an hour
until the greyhound slid back on
their return trip Saturday evening the highway and traffic began to
from Columbus in six buses, a 30-t
mile an hour gale and drifting ciaw again.
snow gave warning of trouble1
ahead. FIVE HOURSlater-a distance

League Changes Complement
CampusConstruction Scene

i
t

* * *
ABOUT 20 miles out of Colum-
bus, the troubles began when one
bus broke down. Since the blind-
ing blizzard had reduced visibility
to practically zero, the five .other
buses continued on their sliding.
way, unaware of the stranded
bandsmen. It wasn't until an
hour later thdt one of the buses
returned, and passengers were
transferred.
Five miles further the slow-
moving buses found their way
blocked by a Greyhound bus, its
rear end having slipped off the
highway. The opposite lane
south was already blocked by
three-foot snow drifts, bringing
traffic in both directions to a
standstill.

of 35 miles having been travelled
in that time-the. rescuing bus
pulled into Marion, Ohio, where
bandsmen were told to find sleep-
ing ,quarters wherever they could.
With all hotel, tourist homes,
and rooms already filled up,
some members slept on mats in
the local YMCA, others stayed
on the five buses, and some
sacked down ih a theatre, where
the manager put on a special
midnight show for them.
Some Marion residents still up
opened their homes to. a-strand-
ed musicians while a restaurant
served free sandwiches and coffee.
The following morning, the
bandsmen continued on their way,
arriving in Ann Arbor-13 hours
late.

Major changes on the first floor
of the Michigan League have lent
more confusion to the atmosphere
of construction and renovation
which was ushered in last June.
Women accustomed to having
"that new coiffure" in the League
beauty shop will find a modern
conference room in the salon's
stead. And .students garbed for
winter weather have discovered a
new cloak room at the south end
of the building.
THE CHANGES are part of a
thorough remodeling and building
program undertaken shortly after
Spring commencemnt.'

The business office is now
situated next to the new con-
ference room and the main desk
and accounting office have been
combined and relocated in the
main lobby.
On the east side of the League,
an extension is underway which
will contain a dishroom, refrigera-
tion unit, refuse rooms and a load-
ing dock.
In the basement, the "Round-
up Room" will replace the first
floor snack bar which will be used
only'for regular meals. Also in the
basement, construction continues
on a new recreation room.

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