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November 25, 1950 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


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Big

Ten.

ivalry

Dates

from

1897

By BILL CONNOLLY
Daily Sports Editor
COLUMBUS-The sub-freezing temperatures that followed Wol-
verines across the state of Ohio into this town are penetrating, but
they don't cut so deeply as do the incessant shouts of "Beat Michigan"
that are echoing from every curbstone in Columbus today.
The weatherman predicts bad news for the Michigan team which
will take the field at 2 p.m. for the 47th meeting since 1897 between
the Buckeyes of Ohio and the Wolverines. Twenty-degree tempera-
tures make for difficult ball handling and are a certainty to slow up
the aerial attack with which Coach Bennie Oostrbaan hoped to
change the Buckeyes' plans for their first victory celebration since
1944.
MICHIGAN WILL BE PLAYING with more than an occasional
thought regarding the outcome of the Illinois-Northwestern tussle
taking place this afternoon in Evanston. Should both the Wildcats
and the Wolverines win today, the Maize and Blue will be the Big
Ten's representative in the 1951 Rose Bowl.
The Wolverines will enter the game this afternoon in their
best physical condition of the year. Loss of Pete Palmer, second-
string quarterback who received a fractured jaw playing against
Northwestern last week, weakens the defensive reserve strength
somewhat, but the return of John Hess to active duty at left tackle
and the continued improvement of Leo Koceski more than offset
this.
Koceski, along with 18 other seniors, is making his final appear-
ance in a maize and blue uniform today. He was injured in the Army

How They'll Line Up
At Columbus Today
OFFENSE

MICHIGAN WT.
Harry Allis (88) 195
Bill Ohlenroth (77) 210
Jim Wolter (66) 192
Carl Kreager (56) 205
Pete Kinyon (68) 195
Dick Strozewski (62) 200
Lowell Perry (85) 178
Bill Putich (24) 160
Leo Koceski (18) 170
Don Dufek (30) 185
Charles Ortmann (49) 190
MICHIGAN WT.
Ozzie Clark (86) 200
Al Wahl (72) 217
Al Jackson (64) 195
Tony Momsen (59) 200
Dick McWilliams (69) 238
Tonm Johnson (76) 205
Harry Allis (88) 195
Lowell Perry (85) 178
Don Peterson (46) 175
Rog Zatkoff (70) 208
Don Dufek (30) 185

HT.
6-0
6-1
6-0
6-4
6-0
6-0
6-0
5-9
5-10
5-11
6-0

Po S.
RE
RT
RG
C
LG
LT
LE
QB
RH
FB
LH

OHIO STATE
Bob Grimes (80)
Bill Trautwein (76)
John Biltz (66)
Bob McCullough (5)
Steve Ruzich (60)
John Wittman (67)
Tom Watson (88)
Tony Curcillo (25)
Walt Klevay (16)
Charles Gandee (32)
Vic Janowicz (31)

WT.
194
237
208
193
209
223
212
188
168
210
182
WT.
185
226
218
194
225
223
191
182
174
189
177

HT.
6-1
6-4
6-0'
6-1
6-2
6-1
6-2
6-1
5-10
5-10
5-9
HT.
6-1
6-2
6-3
6-0
5-10
6-1
6-0
5-9
5-8
5-10
6-0

game mid-way ii October and saw his first service since that time
against the Wildcats last Saturday.
IMPRESSIVE IN HIS FOUR ATTEMPTS to advance the ball, last
week the Wolverine wingback showed up effectively on defense as
well. Rugged workouts this week have helped him regain the speed
and timing which enabled him to score Michigan's only touchdown
in last season's 7-7 deadlock with the Buckeyes. -
Along with Leo in the first-string backfield will be two other
departing seniors who will be shootingfor Big Ten individual
records in the season's final game.
Hard-charging fullback Don Dufek is in strong contention
for the rushing crown, while tailback Chuck Ortmann, despite
a slow start this year, is a possibility to become the only player
in Western Conference record books to lead in total offense for
three years.
Dufek is currently ranked second to Iowa's Bill Reichardt, but
the latter has completed his 1950 Big Ten season and rates only 23
yards ahead of the Michigan line-plunger. Even an average day for
Dufek can earn him the crown.
ORTMANN WILL BE 'COMPETING with the Bucks' versatile
junior, Vic Janowicz for individual honors in the offense department.
Janowicz is currently 75 yards ahead of Michigan's stalwart passer,
but the Ohio star has competed in one more Conference contest than
has Ortmann.
The weather would seem to favor Dufek, who will probably be
called on to carry the burden of the running attack, with Koceski
and Wes Bradford alternating from the wingback slot in his assistance.

DEFENSE

HT. Pos.
6-1 RE
6-3 R T
6-0 RG
6-2 C
6-3 LG
6-2 LT
6-0 LE
6-2 Q B
5-10 RH
6-2 FB
5-11 LH

OHIO STATE
Dick Anderson- (82)
Joe Campanella (72)
Bob Momsen (73)
Bob Held (54)
Jerry Manz (62)
Dick Logan (71)
Sherwin Gandee (84)
Vic Janowicz (31)
Dick Widdoes (28)
Dick Ellwood (24)
Ray Hamilton (10)

LEO KOCESKI (18)

E

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Y

IdIttgan

:atY

Latest Deadline in the State
VOL. LXI, No. 52 ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN SATURDAY, NOV. 25, 1950 SIX PAGES

I - - - - .I.

U.S. Proposes

i

DICK MCWILLIAMS (69)

a panes
WASHINGTON -(p)-- The U
its seven point proposal for a Japa
ing Russia avoice in determining t]
At the same time it was disclos
American proposals, particularly w
Formosa and other islands. Thisr
would go along in the writing of an
THE PUBLICATION of the A
their earlier disclosure in Moscow y

e Treaty

Cold Ohioans
Gayly Greet
'M' Rooters

Cold Feet
MILWAUKEE - ( ) - It was
cold enough yesterday to freeze
a duck's feet.
In f act, it did.
An unidentified woman call-
ed police headquarters and re-
ported that a duck had wad-
Maj] n~hn m L~ake Michi

Big UN Offensive
Meets Resistance
Drive To End Korean War Rolls
On Toward Manchurian Border
TOKYO-(P)-The United Nations offensive to end the Korean
war smacked into Red resistance for the first time yesterday but
kept rolling on toward the border of Manchuria.
On every sector of the snowy northwest front but one, UN forces
continued their generally unopposed advance for four to 10 miles.
" s * * s

CARL KREAGER (56)

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Disputed SL
k Position Goes
To BobPerry
The Men's Judiciary Council yes-
terday awarded Bob Perry, '52E,
the contested Student Legislature
seat and finally ended the longest
Student Legislature vote count on
record.
Perry and Bob Steinberg, '53,
had been deadlocked since 4 a.m.
Wednesday, when weary election
workers discovered signs of fraud
on the ballots of both candidates
in a close race for the last open SL
seat. -
Jim Storrie, '51BAd, SL member
m charge of the election, impound-
ed the disputed ballots and threw
the final decision to the Men's
Jucdiciary Council. l
Council members inspected all
the ballots awarded to each candi-
date at their meeting yesterday
afternoon., The fraudulent ballots
were invalidated and a new count
was taken in which Perry won, 221
--otes to 213.
Though ballot irregularities were
discovered on both sides, the Coun-
cil reported that neither candidate
was implicated in the fraud.
"Ballot tampering was very evi-
dent in some cases," Jim 'Smith,
'52L, president of Men's Judic,
' (Continued on Page 2)

I

nited States pulled the wraps off By PAUL BRENTLINGER area r o1u
nese peace treaty, yesterday offer- Daily City Editor gan and got stuck. It's wet
he future of the island of Formosa. COLUMBUS-Hampered by zero Patrolzman Walter Gae th
sed that Russia has challenged the temperatures and icy streets, foot- freed the bird with a pail of
with respect to the disposition of ball mad Columbus last nght ex- hot water. The temperature
raised doubts whether the Soviets tended a warm welcothe to thou- early yesterday was five below
sands of Wolverine fans.
~y early Japanese treaty.,ad fWlvrn as zero.
y yrBut the sudden cold blast which _er_._
gmerican proposals was forced by left many Ohio cities covered with
snow and ice threatened to cut at-i
yesterday. Moscow also published a tendance at today's game from a
note from the Russians to the U.S. capacity 83,000 to 75,000 according'
questioning details of the Ameri- to OSU ticket Director Ed Weaver. , fp rob em
can plan. *To P be
The fact that the Russians de- DOWNTOWN hotels reported On Far East
cided to make public whatbthe room cancellations from fans scar-
U.S. and other nations had been ed away by the frigid tempera-
treating as confidential for tures. And scalpers found it diffi- LAKE SUCCESS - (P) - The
many weeks was taken by offi- cult to get the $25 a ticket they United Nations unexpectedly an-
cials here as a bad sign. They be- expected. nounced last night that the Se-
lieved the Russians may be try- "Most of the brothers would curity Council will meet at 2 p.m.
ing to make propaganda instead have stayed home all weekend if (CST) today to take up both the
of an agreement. ' ' they could have sold- their tic- Formosan and the Korean prob-
The State Department made kets," one OSU fraternity man lems.,
public 'a note which was circulated reported as he returned yester- ' The meeting was called by Coun-
last month by John Foster Dulles, day from a Thanksgiving Day cil President Ales Bebler, of Yugo-
American diplomat at the UN, vacation. slavia. It had previously been re-
among the members of the 13 na- Despite old man weather's an- ported that the Council would not
tion Far Eastern Commission. tics, campus area in Columbus was meet before next Tuesday or Wed-
, * I buzzing with homecoming activity nesday.
AFTER stating t t the U.S. last night. More than 5000 Buck- * * o
seeks a Japanese eaty whichI eye rooters marched through, cam- THE CALLING of the meeting
would end the state!3of war and pus streets behind a loud band in was of special significance o view
l of the fact that a Chinese Commu-
restore Japan's sovereignty as "an a rousing pep rally. After the rally, nist delegation arrived in New
equal in the society of free peo- a homecoming queen was crowned York early yesterday and confer-
ples," the note laid down seven (Continued on Page 2) red with Secretary-General Try-
"principles" for negotiation amongrge Lie th cetaftGernon alsory
the nations which won the war in High Accident Toll Vas signiitcha tha th ConIunclas
.P.iagenda included the Korean Ques-
Three of these principles ap- ISet During Holiday tion along with the Chinese com-
peared to be of special impor- plaint of American Aggression{

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i{

THEIR THRUSTS carried to Chongju and put them within 51
to 60 miles of the Yalu River boundary and the Reds' most prized
hydroelectric plants.
The Republic of Korea First Division ran into trouble on its
way north to the big Suiho power dam on the Yalu. It was
hit by a counter-attacking Red "
regiment-about 3,000 men.
The South Korean First Division Daily To Greet
was knocked back a half mile in
cold, early morning darkness. Fan Ohio
Then the Reds struck again. The sin
South Koreans fell back another
mile. A touch of home will greet Uni-
BUT THE Korean First had its versity students as they trudge to
own counter-thrust rolling by early the Ohio Stadium in Columbus to-
morning when other UN forces d
jumped off to resume the advance,Eday.
a First Corps spokesman said. Eighteen hundred copies of The
Before the Red counterblow Daily will be distributed from noon
General MacArthur issued a until game time in front of the
morning war summary for. the Ohio State Union and the Stadium.
first time in months to announce The Dailies were taken to Co-
that the UN 100,000-man offen- lumbus at 5:30 a.m. today by the
sive was advancing against light Wolverine Club and will be handed
opposition. out by 14 Daily staff members and
MacArthur 's summary coveredithrassan.
action yesterday when the U.S.thiassan.
24th Division paced the attack by Not only will the Dailies bring
gaining 10 miles and reaching the campus news to University
Chongju, highway hub near the students and an anticipated crowd
west coast. of 15,000 alumni attending the

ALJACKSON (64)

s
l
r
t
i

tance and perhaps significant
sources of controversy.
They are:
1. The treaty would be written
by "any or all" of the victor na-
tions which were willing to co-
operate. That apparently leaves
the way open for the U.S. and oth-
er non-Communist nations to go
ahead with the treaty if the Rus-
sians balk.
2. Responsibility for Japan's se-f
(Continued on Page 2)

v BILL OHLENROTH (77) above
HARRY ALLIS (88) below

By The Associated Press
At least 200 persons-an all time
record high-died in accidents over
the Thanksgiving holiday.
The previous high of 181 Y
set last year.
The crash of New York coma.
er trains on the Long Island ri
road was the chief factor in the
high 1950 death toll. Seventy seven
died in that collision.
But the death toll also was high
f for other types of accidents.
JH H (*
JOHN HESS (79)

against Formosa.V
* *
T H E ASSEMBLY'S Political
Committee, meanwhile, is begin-
ning discussion on similar charges,
)rought by the Soviet Union but
:irst raised by Peiping. The Com-

mittee decided yesterday afternoon latest model built by Russia.
to invite the Chinese Communists There were signs of more pos-
to take part in its discussion, but sible trouble for UN troops. Air
UN officials said new credentials observers reported a Communist
would be needed if this delega- division - about 8,000 men --
tion entered the committee debate. (continued from Page 1)

-I

ON THE ADVANCE the 24th de-
stroyed a Joseph Stalin III tank
=the first of these encountered in
the Korean war. The Stalin III is
believed to be the heaviest and

crucial Michigan-Ohio State con-
flict, but they will give Ohio State
rooters a glimpse of the game from
the Wolverine point of view.
This is the first time The Daily
has followed the team since Janu-
ary, 1948, when a special 16 page
Tournament of Roses edition was
sped by air express to Pasadena
for the Michigan-Southern Cali-
fornia Rose Bowl classic.

TONY MOMSEN (59) above
DON DUFEK (30) below -

* * *
JOHN POWERS (60)

* *

* * *

DICK FARRAR (55)

RALPH STRAFFON (32)

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