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November 22, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THMSDAYNOVEMBER 23, 1950

SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 23, 1950

S

'THE GREAT ZIMPANO':
Caricaturist on Campus
Relates Tales, of Trade

Though he has spent almost all
of his time on college campuses
during the last 16 years, "The
Great Zimpano" has never seen a
football game.
"I never have any time," Zimpa-
no explained. The reason for Zim-
pano's lack of time is his full sche-
dule of drawing caricatures of col-
lege students all over the country.
AT THE present time, Zim-
pano- is engaged in carticaturing
local campus characters. By the
time he finishes here at the end
of the month, he expects to have
drawn the faces of members of
Catholics Start
BuildingDrive
As part of the campaign to ex-
pand the building and facilities of
St. Mary's Chapel, Catholic stu-
dents on campus are being asked
this week to contribute to the Fa-
ther Richard Building Fund, ac-
cording to Rev. John F. Bradley.
Student s'olicitation has been
started by an organization of more
than 180 members.
The building program calls for
a new student center to be erect-
ed next to the St. Mary's Chapel
on Thompson St.
The drive was begun by Catho-
lic alumni of the University, and
the bulk of the source of revenue
foe theproject is expected to come
from them, Father Bradley said.
The amount expected from the
student contributions is $25,000,
he continued. Contributions to the
fund may be made in monthly
payments over a two-year period.

more than 20 fraternities and so-
rorities.
Zimpano, w h o s e Christian
name is August, returns to a
campus every two and a half
years. At each of these campuses
he visits the houses of those fra-
ternities and sororities that have
given him good business in the
past. He often draws the carica-
tures of more than 40 people at
one house.
Zimpano, in drawing carica-
tures, centers his attention on
heads. After drawing a head and
emphasizing all of 'the irregular
features, the subject is asked to
leave the room.
* * *
THE ARTIST then confers with
the "kibitizers" that are watching
him. They tell him of the sub-
ject's idiosycrasies and from this
information, he fills in the draw-
ing, putting the subject into a f a-
miliar pose. Zimpano says that the
most popular "idiosyncracy" when
drawing fraternitly men, is women.
Zimpano, a native of Portches-
ter, N. Y., got his art education
at the County Center, White
Plains, N. Y. After studying there
for three years, he decided to
concentrate on caricature draw-
ing.
He concentrates his work on
fraternities and sororities. At col-
leges that have none, he sets up
shop at the Union buildings.
Averaging about 40 colleges a
year, he makes long distance jumps
from campus to campus.
His years of travel have given
Zimpano a unique way of judging
what kind of spirit a house has. He
tells by the amount of caricatures
that are ordered there. He claims
that most salesmen think along
similar lines.
Michigan Technic'
Sales WillBegin
The November issue of "The Mi-
chigan Technic" will go on sale
Monday and Tuesday, according
to Ken Chase, '52E, Publicity
Manager.
The "Technic" will be sold in
the Engineering Arch and inside
the South exit of the East Engi-
neering Bldg., he said.
Chase also urged University
students to be on the look out for
the December issue, which will be
entirely devoted to the Phoenix
Project. The December issue is
slated to appear just before the
Christmas vacation.
Gets J-Hop Funds
Profits of $456 from last year's
J-Hop have been given to the Uni-
versity Fresh Air Camp, according
to Ned Hess, '51E, chairman of the
dance.
The decision of what to do with
the profits was made by the J-Hop
committee, Hess said.

First Group
Of One-Act
Plays Today
The season's first bill of one-
act plays will be presented at 8 p.m.'
today and tomorrow in Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre.
On the program, sponsored by
the speech department, will be the
works of modern and classical
playwrights.
* * *
INCLUDED are "The Boor," by
Anton Chekhov; the tea party
scene from "The Madwomen of
Chaillot," by Jean Giradoux; "Rid-
ers to the Sea," by John Synge;
and "Pullman Car Hiawatha," by
Thornton Wilder.
"The Boor" is a farce dealing
with the love of a young widow
and a soldier of fortune.
The tea party scene from "The
Madwomen of Chaillot" displays
the mixture of comic and tragic
elements of human nature.
The evil of money and the de-
struction of those who worship it
are the tragic themes that are
contrasted with the comedy relief
of invisible friends and an equally'
invisible dog.
* * *
THE PATTERN of Thornton
Wilder's "Pullman Car Hiawatha"
is reminiscent of his style in "Our
Town."
"Riders to the Sea" is the tragic
story of man's battle against na-
ture, and is considered by many
critics to be one of the greatest
modern tragedies.
Tickets for the plays will be on
sale from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. today,
and from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. tomor-
row at Lydia Mendelssohn box of-
fice. Tickets are 30 cents each.

To help keep notices on Univer-
sity bulletin 'boards up to date,
Alpha Phi Omega, a national ser-
vice fraternity, has devised a plan
that will eliminate time element
mix-ups.
The plan is a result of a stu-
dent's survey of the timeliness of
the announcements after he suf-
fered defeat himself at the hands1
of an outdated notice. In his sur-
vey, he found that of 41 notices
on bulletin boards advertising for
typing, only three were still valid.
"I'M SORRY but the girl who
does typing moved five years ago,",
was a typical reply he received
while doing the survey.
Under the plan devised by Al-
pha Phi Omega, which has been
approved by the University, no-
tices and advertisements are to
be left in the Office of Student
License Levity
TORONTO, Ont.-(R)-J. W.
Perkins, hardware merchant who
issues radio licenses for the Can-
adian government, was fined $5
yesterday.
He didn't have a radio license.

Affairs. They will be picked up
and stamped by members of the
service group, who will then post
the announcements on bulletin
boards that have been designated
by their originator.
Notices will be removed from the
bulletin boards as soon as they be-
come outdated, according to Robert
Lapham, '52E, who is in charge of
the project.
"There is no intention of cen-
sorship behin'd this project. But
notices which are in questionable
taste may be withheld from the
bulletin boards if the proper Uni-
versity authorities advise us to,"
Lapham said.
The non-department bulletin
boards in the following buildings
will be included in the project
1 that will begin Nov. 27: Angell,
Economics, Administration, Nat-
ural Science, and East.
The list of buildings continues
with Tappan, East Engineering,
West Engineering, Chemistry, Ro-
mance Languages, East and West
Medical, Automotive, Physics,
Randall Hall, and Business Admin-
istration.

MANAGED BY APO:
New Plan To Keep Campus
Bulletin Boards Up-to-Date

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
GOBBLER HEADS FOR OVEN-Union chef Narcisco Apriz grins as he holds high a healthy-looking
representative of the half-ton of frozen turkeys which the Union will cook up today.
* * **t * *** *
Town Totters Under Tons of Turkey

/

Unpopular?

By BOB KEITH
Tons of turkey will go the way
of all tasty flesh in Ann Arbor
today.
Food by the carloads will pass
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
WHRV Monday at 7:15 p.m., and
are broadcast on the Voice of Am-
erica to foreign countries. Sub-
jects for discussion:
American Family Life-Nov. 24;
American Foreign Policy-Dec. 1;
American Press-Dec. 8; Re-arm-
ament of Germany-Dec. 15.
Students interested in partici-
pating in the programs may con-
tact Hiru Shah, Moderator of the
Roundtable, 2-1644.
University Museums: Subject of
Program1 for Friday Evening: "In-
dian Crafts and Customs." Two
films: "Hand Industries of Mexi-
co" and "Pottery Making in an
Indian Pueblo," Kellogg Audi-
torium, 7:30 p.m.
Series of figures modeled by
Carleton W. Angell, showing the
steps in Pueblo pottery making,
fourth flooi exhibit hall, Muse-
ums building, which is open from
7 to 9 p.m. Fri.
Graduate Outing Club: Sat.,
Nov. 25. All grads welcome. Lis-
tening party, 'starting at 1:45 p.-
m., followed by supper at 6 p.m.,
outing Club Room, Rackham.
Square Dancing, 8:15 p.m., Jones
School. A.Y.H. members bring
passes.

from cold storage to ovens as ! ten course turkey d i n n e r s
thousands of hungry glutton's let throughout the day. He estimated
out their belts in anticipation of that four crates of celery, eight
a big feast and an even bigger bags of potatoes and 50 gallons of
case of indigestion, cider would go into the feast.
*I ** * *
RESTAURANTS all over town THE RESTAURANT'S staff of
have laid in huge stocks of tur- 70 was busy yesterday making sa-:
keys, celery, potatoes and pump- lad and giving the turkeys an
kin pie. And the chefs have rolled initial toasting. Final cooking will
up their sleeves in preparation for take place today.
their traditional day of glory. And today will see plenty of ac-
At the Union, Chef Narcisco tivity in University dorm kitchens.
Apraiz plans to set the table Food service officials said 200
for at least 1,400 paying guests. turkeys and 356 pies would be de-
"It won't be much extra work," voured by students remaining here
he commented casually. "This is for the holiday.
tame compared to a football For The Daily, this year's
weekend."b Thanksgiving offered an oppor-
Nonetheless Apraiz was con- tunity to follow through on a
fronted yesterday with 35 mon- widely separated-but neverthe-
strous gobblers and more than less consecutive-series on the
100 ducklings which must get turkey dinner situation.
roasted and stuffed by this after- i
noon.Two years ago the paper sent a
non r. reporter out to interview a live
APRAIZ planned to s t artturkey. Last Thanksgiving, the
cooking the birds this morning. slaughtering process came in for
"It's no good if you do it the day scrutiny. Naturally, today's story
before," he said "The turIeys dry had to survey cooking procedure.
out, don't slice so well and worst' Its obvious successor was best out-
of all don't taste right," the ex- lined by a disgruntled West Quad-
perienced foodman noted. der from New York. who said:
"Perhaps by next year the Uni-
But he had his dressing-trays versity will give you enough vaca-
and trays of it-thrown togeth- tion time to write the finale-an
er by yesterday afternoon. Fix- article on what a turkey dinner

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PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S * PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S *

Too bad, eh? Florabelle Flop is so
pretty. Uses a lipstick well, too. But
she doesn't carry that modern essen-
tial of fastidious women (and men)
BREATH-O-LATOR, the miracle
inhaler that neutralizes breath odors
instantly, completely. BREATH-O-
LATOR contains Neutragen - each
wafer good for two weeks; refills 3
for 25¢. Just breathe in deeply, twice.
Harmless. Get BREATH-O-LATOR
today. "Keep a fresh breath in your
pocket." At all good drug counters. (A
Bing Crosby Research project.)

ing dressing is no minor task.
The stuffing used up approxi-
mately 45 large-size loaves of_
bread at a large new restaurant
on U.S. 112, according to mana-
ger Frederick K.-Lory.
Lory plans to serve 1,200 huge_

U I

with the family actually tastes
like."
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

These people have just
read about
MILLER'S 44c LUNCH
It's a Real Deal!
I. D. MILLER'S
211 South State

ex Efl '

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FACTORY SMOKERS
CIGARS
Full Size Perfectos

Reg. 5c
Ten for

Prices Effective Thursday,
ROY REID Friday, Saturday
Proprietor We Reserve the Right To Limit
Quantities.

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10 ,BARS
WRISLEY
PERFUMED
BATH SOAP
In Plastic Re-use Bag

45C

89c
Value

59

Value
59cIO
L IMIT ONE

DELICIOUS
CREAMY
THIN
MINTS

LIMIT TEN

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POPULAR
CIGARETTES

CARTON
LIMIT ONE

$1.75

plus tax

AFTER THANKSGIVING
DRESSES and SUITS
REDUCED FROM OUR REGULAR STOCK
DRESSES
Casual, afternoon and festive occasion dresses. Junior, misses' and
half-sizes. Crepes, taffetas, wools, corduroys, jerseys, gabardines,
and velvet combinations and trims.
1O $15 $25 -

GIFT SCOUTING?
...here's the Perfect gift
that /

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SOFT SKIN
WASH
CLOTHS
30c Value
2 for 19
LIMIT TWO

25c Val.
BABY'S
NATURAL BRISTLE
BOTTLE.
BRUSH

Save 26c
MOLLE
SHAVE
CREAM

Only
Each

7 c

Reg. 25c
3 for

49C

'O-
r
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N0
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-4
In
I-
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m
NI
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FLASH BULBS

ALL SIZES
0-25-40-5-1 1-32
SMs - SF

2 fo25

I

F

Formerly to $16.95

Formerly to $21.95

Formerly to $35.00

. ._

SUITS
Novelty wools, corduroys and gabardines, sizes 9 to 15 and 10 to 18.

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20c Val.
Adhesive
TAPE

TWO
FOR

21

TWO
FOR

51c

50c Val.
Analgesic
BALM

=yH

NATURAL BRISTLE
land Brush
ONLY 23C

I

L

50c

Vol.

.. _. .

REYNOLDS WRAP

Aluminum Foil
1001 household uses

39(

Formerly $22.95 to $59.95.
Reduced 2570

WEBSTER VJCHICAGO

3-SPEED PORTABLE
Am&- % /

PHONOGRAPH
.etter-than-ever in full, rh
tone and precision record-
changing, this new Webster-
Chicago portable plays 7",
10", and 12" records .. . at
331/3, 45 or 78 rpm . .. any-

6icSALE

F

Il itlsh l Sale
. {.:}. * ;;...:....... }'}:}..:,: "i:::7::::
6 oz. Glasses...... 6 for 19c
12 oz. Ice Tea Glass 6 for 39c

No Refunds

No Exchanges

All Sales Final

III lI

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