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November 21, 1950 - Image 6

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-21

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 19

I I

FLU VACCINE PIONEER:
Dr. Francis Probes Disease Mysteries

By RON WATTS
One of the cardinal rules with
Dr. Thomas Francis, Jr. is that
opinion must not be accepted as
fact, particularly in epidemiology.
The man of medium build and
keen, bright eyes has been carry-
ing on his work of probing into
the mysteries of infectious dis-
ease without interruption since
his graduation from the Yale
Medical School in 1925.
S * * *
DR. FRANCIS, who has held
the chairmanship of the Depart-
ment of Epidemiology in the
School of Public Health since 19-
41, often emphasizes to his class
that "no case is ever closed-we
must constantly keep working and
investigating the old theories and
new problems."
Probably best known of his
discoveries is Type B influenza.
At the time of discovery in 1940,
it was one of the two known
types. He went on to isolate the
Type B influenza virus and
worked toward the development
of a vaccine which was widely
used by the armed forces dur-
ing World War I.
Just recently the discovery of
influenza C was reported by him
and his associates.
* * *
FOR HIS OUTSTANDING work
with the Army, Dr. Francis re-
ceived in 1946 a personal citation
and Medal of Freedom from Sec-
retary of War Paterson.
Beside his affiliations with
the National Academy of Sci-
ences, Society of Clinical Inves-
tigation, Association of Ameri-
can Physicians, Society of Am-
erican Bacteriologists and Am-
erican Public Health Associa-
tion, Dr. Francis is one of the
nine men on the University fa-
culty to hold the title of Uni-
versity Professor. This recogni-
tion was made 'in 1947 by the
Board of Regents.
Each of the nine men were to
take the name of a former out-
standing professor in his field. In
Dr. Francis's case, it was Henry
Sewall who is regarded as one of

-Daily-Tom Seyfertb
DR. THOMAS FRANCIS, JR.
Chairman of the Department of Epidemology
* * * * * ,*

the pioneers in the field of im-
munization and public health.
* * *
WHEN ASKED how he felt to-
ward his role in public health, Dr.
Francis flashed his quick smile
and explained that it had been
widely varied and very interesting.
"My work during the recent
years has dealt with adminis-
tration, teaching and research,"
Dr. Francis said. I've enjoyed it,
but there seem to be too many
things that keep me from the
laboratory-and that's where I
really like to be."
"I guess varied experiences are
characteristic of public health. So
many people still think of the
health officer as the one who
comes around to put up the quar-
antine cards and keep the rubble
out of the streets," he continued.
* * *
"ACTUALLY," Dr. Francis re-
ported, "public health people are
at work in every community
checking its health, its water sup-
plies, milk and diseases."

"Our jobs are somewhat differ-
ent from the ordinary medical as-
pect," he said. "We are concerned
not only with curing an individual
of sickness, but we try to reveal
the phenomenon behind the sick-
ness and to maintain health. This
hunt may lead into the fields of
sociology, psychology, economics
and others."
"But the most important
thing to me is the continued
scientific investigation of di-
sease or disability as a biologic
problem," Dr. Francis asserted.
"It is this respect that epidem-
iology is a fundamental con-
cept."
"I'm under the impression that
the lack of interest in public
health activities is due to a lack
of knowledge of our work," Dr.
Francis emphasized.
In answer to the question con-
cerning which of his many honors
gave him the most satisfaction,
Dr. Francis paused a moment and
then replied, "I can honestly say
that I was surprised to receive
any.of them. And each one made
me very happy."
"But I think that really the
most important thing to me is be-
ing free to do my work."
'U' Awards Angell
Building Contract
The University announced yes-
terday that the contract for the
construction of superstructure on
the Angell Hall addition has been
awarded to a Detroit building firm.
Their bid, the lowest received,
was $3,458,307 and the firm must
complete the superstructure with-
in 450 days from the contract date.
A Washington construction firm
is now at work on the building's
footings and foundation.

Health Unit
Plan Cited
By Expert
"Ideally sized units of public
health administration are neces-
sary to the nation," according to
Prof. Haven Emerson, formerly of
the Columbia University public
health school.
"These units must be large
enough to economically operate,
yet small enough to distribute
their services over the nation,"
Prof. Emerson said. He spoke be-
fore the public health assembly on,
the subject of "Local Health Units
for the Nation."
a*on * *
A PLAN, formed under the au-
spices of leading health organiza-
tions, and describing a system of
12 to 15 hundred local units, was
explained by Prof. Emerson.
He termed the plan as ideal
for effective public health ad-
ministration but said that politi-
cal traditions, habit, and politi-
cal entrenchment in various lo-
cal units have rejected the plan
in various parts of the nation.
An increase from 35.6 per cent to
70.8 per cent of people served by
local public health units between
1922 and 1950 was used by Prof.
Emerson to illustrate the effect of
the consolidation movement which
got its big start in 1942 as a move
toward national defense.
"A major problem in providing
adequate public health service is
not funds but a lack of person-
nel," Prof. Emerson said. "For in-
stance a nurse must be responsible
for no more than 2500 people but;
this is not possible in many in-
stances"
Students' Music
To Be Performed
The first student composers'
forum of the school year will be
held at 8:30 p.m. tomorrow in
Rackham Assembly Hall.
Held under the direction of
Prof. Ross Finney of the School
of Music, the forum was begun
two years ago to give student com-
posers an opportunity to have
their works performed and criti-
cized.
The program will consist of
"Symphony in D" by Dean Nu-,
erhberger, Grad.; "Concertoin A"
by Fred Truesdell, Grad.; "String
Quartet in B flat (1950)" by Ro-
bert Cogan, '51, and "Symphony
in Two Moyements" by Grant
Beglarian, Grad. . .
Following the performance Prof.
Gilbert Ross, Prof. Helen Titus,
Harvey Gross, Grad., and Ed Chu-
dacoff, Grad. will participate in a
panel discussion of the works. I

The figure-skating season skid-1
ded into the Coliseum yesterday
with several echoing thuds.
The scene at the rink was a
comedy in contrast, as experts
whirled and beginners tried vain-
ly to imitate the fancy leaps and
spins, in the first meeting of the
figure skating club.
The elite band of stars dominat-
ed the center of the rink skim-
ming on one blade, whirling up
and down like mechanical tops or
clicking their blades in mid-air.
The beginners around the peri-
phery watched with awe as the
gaily dressed elite flipped through
their routines.
Since formal training doesn't
begin until next week their only

possible course was to copy the
fancy manuevers that were being
displayed.
But there were varying degrees
of success. The timid women es-
sayed only a trial turn, but a more
daring bunch of men attacked the
aerial leap. Two landed hind-side
up, but one with a resounding
nose-dive copped honors for the
best slip-up of the day.
Among the more than 25 who
attended the opening of the rink
were several men more interested
in speed' than fancy figures, es-
pecially one young man who 'p-
peared in traditional hockey-rac-
ing skates and whirled around the
rink at high velocity.

r

CHEAP TRIMMING-Haircuts given by this Korean barber cost
only ten cents, in sharp contrast to clipping costs here in Ann
Arbor. He operates in Pukchong, North Korea for those interested
in enjoying his lower rates.
Famous Faculty Quartet Will
Play Chamber Concert Today

FANCY FIGURES CUT:
Skate Club Opens Season

4

k
'1

The University's Stanley Quar-
tet will present the first chamber'
music concert of the season at 8:30
p.m. today in the Rackham Lec-
ture Hall.
An all-faculty group from the
School of Music, the quartet was
organized in the fall of 1948 and
was given official University recog-
nition the following semester.
VIOLINIST MAUL. DOKTOR,
cellist Prof. Oliver Edel and violin-
ists Emil Rabb and Prof. Gilbert
Ross comprise the quartet.
It was named after the late
Prof. Albert Stanley, a pioneer
in the development of music at
Ann Arbor, founder of the Cho-
ral Union and head of the School
of Music.
During the past two years it has
become a campus favorite and has
achieved marked state-wide suc-
cess by its numerous recitals
throughout Michigan.
SEVERAL of the group's mem-'

bers have toured both America and
Europe with internationally fam-
ous string quartets
One of the most important as-
pects of the quartet's policy is
its promotion of contemporary
music.
Though tonight's program will
be on a strictly classical theme-
the three "Rasoumowsky Quartets"
by Beethoven in sequence-the
second program, to be offered in
December, will be comprised solely
of contemporary American works.
Tonight's concert, as are all per-
formances by the Stanley Quartet,
will be open to the public free of
charge.
OPTICAL SERVICE
CAMPUS OPTICIANS
222 Nickels Arcade
Phone 2-91 16

4

Student L
Providenc
Providenci

ounge o/ Acguinas Hall
e, Colg w
fp . NC1
Meeting the gang to discuss a

quiz

!

t

EXECUTIVE
CAREERS
IN RETAILING
One-year Course
leads to
Master's
Degree

* Prepare to step into a responsible
executive position in the retailing
field: buying, advertising, fashion,
personnel. Specialized training, ex-
clusively for college graduates, covers
merchandising, personnel manage-
ment, textiles, store organization, sales
promotion, and all phases of store
activity. Realistic approach under
store-trained faculty. Classes are com-
bined with paid store work. Students
are usually placed before graduation.
Co-educational. Master's degree.
Limited enrollment. Write Admissions
Office for Bulletin C.
RESEARCH BUREAU FOR RETAIL TRAINING
UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH " Pittsburgh 43 Pa.

MILLER'S DAILY FEATURE
COMPLETE DINNER ... 59c
Corned Beef and Cabbage .. . Potato
Salad or Vegetable
Roll and Butter . .. Beverage
. D. MILLERS CAFETERIA
211. South State

-or just killing time betyeen
classes -the Student Lounge of
Acquinas Hall at Providence Col-
lege is one of the favorite places for
a rendezvous. At the Student
Lounge, as in college campus
haunts everywhere, a frosty bottle.
of Coca-Cola is always on hand for
the pause that refreshes-Coke
belongs.

5ยข

Ask for it either way .. both
trade-marks mean the same thing.

SOTTLED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE COCA-COLA COMPANY BY .
Ann Arbor Coca-Cola Bottling Company
1 i950' The Coca-Cola Company

GREYHOUND LINES'- SHORTWAY LINESo
SPECIAL BUS SERVICE
for THANKSGIVING
LEAVE MICHIGAN UNION 3:30 P.M. NOVEMBER 22

PHOTOGRAPHS TAKEN LUS AFR
ON CAMPUS
AUBURN '51
----------

J

For
Chicago, II. . . .
Cleveland, Ohio
Grand Rapids, Mich.

One Way Fare
. 5.25

.

. . . . 4.40
.0..3.35

Return Fare
9.45
7.95
6.05

All Fares Subject to '15% Federal Tax
Reservations Close at 4:00 P.M. Tuesday, Nov. 21
SCHEDULES, RESERVATIONS, TICKETS TO EVERYWHERE

GRERHOUND TERMINAL
116 West Huron St.
Telephone 2-5511

November 21 and 22
MICHIGAN UNION LOBBY
10 A.M. to 8 P.M.

*1
FIVE MORE TITLES ADDED TO THE
New American Edition of
EVERYMAN'S
LIBRARY
HE LONG-PLANNED PROJECT of the New American Edition of Everyman's
Library having been launched so successfully this spring, with ten titles in
the new edition, the publisher now announces the next five titles. This beautiful
edition, with its rich gold stamping on fine cloth binding, its clear type and wide
. margins, is growing in popularity. They are only $1.25 a volume. Here are the
new titles:
. MOBY-DICK THE HISTORY OF THE

{

I

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