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September 26, 1950 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 1950

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Great Smoke
Darkens Ann
Arbor Skies
Canadian Fire
Caused Gloom
The Great Smoke that hovered
over Ann Arbor and most of the
Midwest and East Sunday was
nowhere to be seen yesterday as
it made its way over the Atlantic
and was succeeded here by a
bright Fall day that dispelled
thoughts that the world was com-
Ing to an end.
The villain that caused the
gloomy day of eerie twilight, ac-
cording to Prof. Robert Kessling,
meteorologist of the geology de-
partment, was a large mass of
stable air that trapped smoke
belching from forest fires in
northern Alberta, Canada. The
trapped smoke was then carried
east by the normal flow of air
above the mass and should dis-
sipitate somewhere over the At-
lantic, Prof. Kessling said.
Unike people in many other
communities An'n Arborits in
general did not go wild with fear
and excitement. The Police and
Fire Departments could only re-
port that it was just another Sun-
day for them. There didn't seem
to be any queries about atomic
bursts, tornados or what have you.
And switchboards were not "flood-
ed with telephone calls from
bewildered and frightened per-
sons" as reported from Detroit.
The fires in Alberta had been
belching up the smoke for a week
until it hung in a blanket 10;000
feet thick within the stable air
mass. The upper air picket up the
mass and it passed over Lake Su-
perior and entered the United
States early Sunday morning.
Weatherman
Forecasts
Warm Fall
Students worried that the un-
seasonable weekend weather might
be the vanguard of a cold, cold
winter can stop that worrying-
for the present.
According to a spokesman at
the Willow Run Weather Bureau,
yesterday's balmy weather-nearer
the norm for Ann Arbor in the
fall-will get even balmier today,
with a high of 75 forecast.
Of course, the Willow Run
spokesman wanted it made clear,
this year's winter may still be a
rough one. Considering that the
last two winters here have been
unusually mild, the law of aver-
ages might indicate this, he de-
clared.
But, he emphasized, it's too
early to tell yet.
Cause of the lowered tempera-
tures, the weatherman explained.
was an "outbreak of polar air;
which came down the eastern side
of the Canadian Rockies and then
traveled eastward, breaking up
numerous last flings in the out-
doors planned by class- returning
Michigan students.
Blome To Head
Pharmacognasy
Walter H. Blome, professor of
pharmacy and pharmacognosy, has
been named new head of the
pharmacognosy department by of-
ficials of the College of Phar-

macy.
Prof. Blome, a graduate of Ala-
bama Polytechnic Institute, was
formerly employed as chief phar-
macist for a Detroit pharmaceu-
tical company. ,

;w

Theatrical
Groups Plot
Joint Show
Student Players and Theatre
Guild, two rival independent dra-
ma societies, have banded together
this semester to pro6ii^F more and
better shows, accoroing to stage
manager Burt Sapowitch, '51.
The merger was forced by the
temporary suspension of Theatre
Guild last semester following a
party which caused Student Af-
fairs Committee action against the
group.
PLANS are now in progress to
make the merger permanent when
Theatre Guild regains approval
1ext semester. In the meantime,
the residue of the organization
has joined Student Players re-
hearsals for their first show,
"Light Up the Sky," by Moss Hart
which will be produced Oct. 26,
27 and 28.
Casting for the show is almost
completed, but students inter-
ested in the organization will
still be needed for stage crew
and publicity work, Sapowitch
said.
Meetings are held at 7 p.m. daily
in the League, and the room will
be posted on the bulletin board, he
said.-

-Daily-Burt Sapowitcha
WELCOME BACK-Dean Samuel T. Dana of the School of Natural Resources, formerly the school
of Forestry and Conservation, welcomes John Riley, '41F&C, graduate student returning to study
under the new curricula presented in the college. Fisheries and Conservation curricula have been
added to the new college which was formerly announced last April.
0 ~* * * * ________

300 ENROLLED:

Lambda Chi.,

'a

Natural Resources School DKE Houses
Begins First Semester Robbed Here

7

Read and Use The Michigan Daily Classifieds!

By HARRY REED
The School of Natural Resources
which replaced the School of For-
estry and Conservation, opened its
doors for the first time yesterday
with approximately 300 students
enrolled.
Dean Samuel T. Dana expressed
disappointment in the enrollment,,
which in spite of the change and
addition of courses, fell below last
year's. He blamed the draft and
reactivation of Army and Navy
reserves.
THE NEW COLLEGE, he ex-
plained, has continued three of the
Forestry and Conservation cur-
ricula, Forestry, Wood Technolo-
gy, and Wild Life Management,
and have added two more, Fisher-
ies and Conservation.
Fisheries was formerly under
the Zoology department, but
conservation:is a new curricula.
More than 50 courses are offered
in the school, including logging
and milling at an instructional
sawmill outside of Dexter, Mich-
igan.
The' sawmill fits right in with
the particular emphasis the school
places on field work. "Most of our
students have four or five after-
noons a week of practical field
work," Dean Dana said.
* * *
"THE CHANGE in schools was
SL Announces
Movie Plans
Campus organizations which
wish to sponsor movies during the
school year in coordination with
the newly-formed Cinema Guild
Committee of the Student Legisla-
ture may file petitions from 3 to
5 p.m. starting tomorrow in the SL
office in the Administration Bldg.
According to Leonard Wilcox,
chairman of th ecommittee, cri-
teria to be used in determining
choices * include the degree to
which activities aided by these
funds affect the entire student
body or useful and charitable pur-
poses.
Other criteria are the relative
need of the organizations for
funds and the past record of the
group in similar undertakings.
Wilcox asked that all petition-
ing groups give date preferences.

Two fraternity houses
robbed early Saturday.

were

part of the natural evolution which
the school has been undergoing
for some time. In the future we
have hopes for a natural resources
program which will interest the
average student in some agricul-
tural and mineral subjects," said
Dana.
Formerly there were few open-
ings for women graduating with
Forestry degrees, but Dean Dana
sees new openings for women in
the Conservation curricula. Two
women have graduated in the 23
years Dean Dana has headed the
Porestry and Natural Resources
school, and there is one coed due
to graduate in June.
Dean Dana termed expansion of
lab and class facilities "highly es-
sential" to the school. "We are
very crowded here, but perhaps
in the future, we'll inherit a build-
ing of our own somewhere," he
said hopefully," or maybe even get
a new one. We've had plans for
one drawn up since 1944."

Chic Griffin, '51, vice president
of Lambda Chi Alpha, 1601 Wash-
tenaw, reported that house was
robbed,, between 3 and 6 a.m. Sa-
turday, of a television set worth
$375, $300 cash and personal
property valued at about $250, in-
cluding a suit and a typewriter.
Two French doors were found un-
locked in the morning.
Three typewriters, two electric
razors and a German revolver were
stolen from the Delta Kappa Ep-
silon house, 1912 Geddes, accord-
ing to Arthur Dunne, '52, a mem-
ber. Dunne said the theft occurred
between'2 and 6 a.m. Saturday.
Ann Arbor police said $24 and a
.22 rifle were also stolen from the
DKE house but Dunne said the
rifle had been loaned out by one
of the members and since has been
returned.
Police said doors were left un-
locked in both houses. Police have
alerted local pawn shops, the usual
procedure in such cases.

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