100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 17, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-17

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

' ;.:

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FLAY, NOVEMBER 17, 1954

PAGE SIZ FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 17, 195Q

SL EFFECTS CHANGE:
'U' Speech Clinic E xtends Student Aid
* * * * 4

SL a lbting To Begin Mon day

I"

Daily-Tom Seyferth
FOR THE RECORD-Walter Brooks, '52 NR, records his voice at
the University Speech Clinic as Miss Anna Carr, speech con-
sultant, and Joel Uhrich, '54, listen. The recordings are used to
analyze the student's defect and show progress in correcting the
defect.
ROTC To Aid SL Elections

S t u d e n t s receiving remedial
training for defective speech at
the University's Speech Clinic can
thank the Student Legislature for
making the service possible.
It was largely through the SL's
interest and effort that the Clinic
was transformed into the practi-
cal aid to human adjustment it is
today.
* * *
LAST YEAR the main student
function of the Clinic was to test
Freshmen during orientation week,
and then report the results to
Health Service. Prof. Harlan
Bloomer, director of the Clinic,
explained that because the group
didn't have enough funds to hire
a speech consultant, only 20 stu-
dents were treated for their speech
defects last semester.
However SL recognized the
need for more help at the clinic.
A conference between an SL re-
presentative and Provost James
Adams resulted in a larger ap-
propriation for the group this
year.
Many of the students now tak-
ing the free course at the Clinic
were directed there by speech ex-
aminers during Freshmen Orien-
tation Week. Others applied at
the Clinic for help themselves.
Prof. Bloomer reported that
though the speech Clinic now can
accommodate only a portion of
the speech handicapped men and
womnen enrolled at the University,
it hopes to expand its facilities to
include all students who need the
service.
UNIVERSITY
CHOIR CONCERT
at Hill Auditorium
on Nov. 16 now available
on 78 and LP records.
Taken from WUOM tapes.
IDIOM RECORDING CO.
Phone 2-7550
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

* * *

* * *

* * *

MEMBERS OF PUBLIC RELATIONS AND CITIZENSHIP COMMITTEES DISCUSS LAST MINUTE
DETAILS CONCERNING NEXT WEEK'S ALL-CAMPUS ELECTIONS.

The campus elections next Mon-
day and Tuesday will-be coordinat-
ed by a communications network
that will be operated by students
of the University ROTC Signal
Corp.
At 8 a.m. tomorrow, the signal
students directed by their instruc-
tor, Major Gerald W. Shivers, will
climb trees and extend the wires
to key polling spots.
It * * s
WIRES will be strung from the
signal headquarters at the Rifle
Range to the Unioni Alumni Me-
Astronomy Open
House To Be Held
The astronomy department will1
hold the third in their series of
"Visitors' Nights" from 7:30 p.m.
to 8 p.m. today at Angell Hall.
Prof. Helen W. Dodson, of. the
McMath-Hulbert Observatory In,
Pontiac, Mich., will give a short,
illustrated talk on "Jupiter, the
Giant Planet," in Rm. 3017 Angell
Hall.
If the sky is cloudy, visitors will
,have an opportunity to examine
the telescopes and planetarium.
Children who attend must be ac-
companied by adults.

morial Hall, both ends of the Di-
agonal, and to Waterman Gym-
nasium.
During both election days, SL
members will supervise the elec-
tions from the rifle range, distri-
buting ballots, receiving latest
counts, and handling other ad-
ministrative problems.
The telephone network is also
intended as a field problem for
the Signal Corp. students.
Solomon To Play
The noted English pianist, Sol-
omon, will present the fourth con-
cert in the Choral Union Series at
8:30 p.m., Monday in Hill Audi-
torium.

* * * *

* * *

MILLER'S DAILY FEATURE
COMPLETE DINNER ... 59C
Fillet of Cod . . . Potato
Salad or Vegetable
Roll and Butter . . . Beverage
J. D. MILLER'S CAFETERIA
211 South State

A
DAILY
PICTURE
FEATURE
Story by
Rich Thomas
Pictures by
Bert Sopowich,
Roger Reinke
and
Malcolm Shatz

'25 Vacancies To, Be
Filled by Elcto
When all-campus elections take place next Monday and Tuesday,
25 students will be selected from the 57 candidates to serve as your
representatives on the Student Legislature.
Just what is this Student Legislature? where has it come from?
what has it done? what will it do in the future? The following sketch
is offered to help answer some of these questions.
The last query, however, is one that will be answered next Monday
and Tuesday at the campus polling booths. It is only through active
interest of the student body, expressed in terms of a large election
turnout, that the most qualified candidates can be elected to the SL,
and that the SL can have h future at all promising.
* - * * *
DESPITE A SHORT and checkered past, the Student Legislature
today is a powerful body with the respect and interest of most Univer-
sity administrators and students.
Winning this respect was no easy task; because student
government on campus has been traditionally viewed as a lacka-
daisical, do-nothing group.
By dint of hard work and fertile thinking, however, the SL
has risen to a high place in campus affairs.
Faculty evaluation, for example, is the product of several months
work of an SL sub-committee and requires many hours of administra-
tive work each semester.
* * * *
ONE OF THE SL'S first undertakings, in the late fall of 1946,
resulted in the idea of the Phoenix Project. The Legislators, in casting
about for a suitable war memorial generally agreed that a living
memorial, something useful, would be best.
During their negotiations with the administration and groups
throughout the country for an acceptable idea, Fred J. Smith, New
York magazine publisher, suggested a peacetime atomic research
project.
The idea was quickly adopted and after nearly four years of
ground work the Phoenix Project fund drive, began this)all.
LAST SPRING the SL took over a major portion of the work of
calendaring campus events from the Student Affairs Committee.
Legislators hope eventually to be able to assume complete responsibility
for calendaring, bringing the regulation of student events under stu-
dent hands.
The removal of tennis court fees last spring was brought
about largely through the efforts of the SL's Varsity Committee.
SL sponsors the Michigan Forum, a committee which brings
prominent speakers to campus to debate controversial topics. It also
sponsors student debates on current campus issues.
* * * -
ALTHOUGH student governments of pre-war vintage performed
many similar functions, it is doubtful that any of them reached the
stature the present SL enjoys.
The history of University student government goes back as
early as May, 1906. Minutes of a University Senate meeting at
that time disclose that President Angell asked for and got approval
from the Senate to authorize a Student Council.
This Council regulated customs, rallies, ceremonies and ruled
in general on all phases of student behavior not covered by University
regulations.
* S s s
THE COUNCIL did these things, that is, In between the consti-
tutional reorganizations which disrupted student government with
alarming regularity.
No less than 13 major constitutional amendments or com-
plete new student governments have been instituted in the 44
years since 1906.
Between 1906 and 1921, four major constitutional reorganizations
occurred.
* * * *
BY 1934 THE MEN, to whom membership in all-campus govern.
ment had been restricted thus far, evidently decided the women's touch
was needed to stabilize the situation.
For in the spring of that year, the women were allowed to sit
on the newly formed Undergraduate Council, composed of repre-
sentatives from all major campus organizations.
This epic change came just 15 years after the country had given
national suffrage to all women citizens.
Evidently enfranchizing the ladies only worsened matters, for the
Undergraduate Council had met but a few times when studies of the
student governmental organization were again undertaken.
The upshot of these studies was that in the fall of 1935 the
women were again disenfranchized and the Undegraduate Council
was dissolved.
In its place a Men's Council was established.
THINGS HAD REACHED such vacilating straights, that the
late Dean of Students Joseph A. Bursley, in his annual report to the
president in 1935 wrote "How long it will be before this Council is
supplanted by another of different form, only the future can tell."
That "future" told almost at once, for in the fall of '38 the
constitution was again amended and in '39, the Men's Council.
dissolved itself and established the Men's Judiciary Council.
From 1939 till April 1946, the campus had no representative
legislative body.
* * * *
THEN, WITH THE end -of the war, came /a renewal of interest
in campus affairs and the present Student Legislature.
Having just completed their most successful year, Student Legisla-

tors are looking forward to an even better year in the one at hand.
With such projects as the SL Cinema Guild, Thanksgiving Holiday,
Homecoming dance, pep rallies, the annual freshman-sophomore Tug
Week and World Student Service yund direction already on the fire,
the Legislators' aspirations may be realized.
But it is only through the continued and ever increasing support
of the student body that the Legislature's aims can become fact.
It's YOUR Student Legislature; back it up by voting next Monday
or Tuesday for qualified candidates.

l

U

STUDENT LEGISLATOR DAVE BELIN, '51, CONTEMPLATES
THE PRINCIPLE AIM OF THE SL'S THANKSGIVING HOLIDAY
PLAN--A HOME-ET TURKEY
* * s *

For the Music Major
on your Christmas list -
give a Musical Gift
from LYON & HEALY

a t

.. IN ANN ARBOR
508 East William Street
of musical
plete-and
. . if it's
Healy-.
Miseellaneous

i
:

I

Here at Lyon & Healy, you'll find a sweeping array c
gifts for Christmas! Our stocks are fresh and comp
sure to please. Come in to buy or just browse .
music you want-you'll always find it at Lyon &
Ann Arbor's "UNIVERSITY MUSIC HOUSE"!
Records
BACH:I Mass in B. Minor Ukelel
Rovdrt Shaw RCA Victor Chorale & Orch. Harm
Auto
Victor LM 6100 .... ........... .$16.35 Busts
Twirlir
BEETHOVEN: Symphony No. 9 Tonett
BEETHOVEN: Egmont Overture Op. 84

es ...
onicas ...
Harps ...
of Musicia
ng Batons.
tes 1.00

..........$4.75
......... . 1.00
..........18.00
ns ........ .25
........... 2.00
Clarinette 2.50

to $20.00
to 15.00
to 25.75
to 3.00
to 9.00
Flute 60c

LEGISLATORS DISCUSS THE SUCCESS OF THE FIRST FEW
DAYS STUDENT PHOENIX FUND DRIVE WITH MARV
LUBECK, DRIVE CHAIRMAN.
* * * * * *
.. ..;.. : .

* * *

TEN CENT PROGRAMS
,.. 'under SL supervision

V..

Berkshire Festival Chorus, Robert Shaw, Dir.
Victor LM 6001.................$10.90
COLEMAN, RONALD: A Christmas Carol
Victor Young
LAUGHTON, C.: Mr. Pickwick's Christmas
Decca 8010 .....................$4.85
HANDEL: The Messiah
Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by
Sir Malcolm Sargent

Books
Beethoven-Nine Symphonies ........$3.75

'ri -

Story of a Hundred Operas ...... . ...
Oxford Book of Carols ...... ......
Christmas Carolers Book...........
Dictionary of Musical Themes ........
Fireside Book of Folk Songs . ........
Victor Book of Concertos ............
Authentic Librettos of Operas Wagner etc.
Mozart-the Man and his Works ......

.65
3.50
.50
5.00
3.95
3.95
2.50
1.98

_A-
.~T
Y, k:..:
S

Columbia SL 51 Volume One.......$14.55

U

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan