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November 16, 1950 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-16

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1,

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 16, 1950

It

GROUNDED GONDOLA:
'Gondoliers' Crew Try
To Float Ship on Stage

By WENDY OWEN
A ship can float without water.
At least that's the hope of the
Gilbert and Sullivan Society's pro-
duction crew.
Alumni View
FootballFilms
Alumni who were not able to at-
tend Michigan football games this
season will not miss out entirely
on the gridiron thrills.
J. Stuart Finlayson, Michigan
Alumni Association field secretary,
is now in the East showing movies
to various University alumni clubs,
while Robert 0. Morgan has been
traveling throughout the Middle
West.

Alumni clubs in
Chicago, Long Island
New York have seen
movies this week.

Kalamazoo,
and Beacon,
the football

I

THEY'LL HAVE a chance to
test this theory during their pre-
sentation of "Gondoliers" which
will run Dec. 13, 14 and 15 in Pat-
tengill Auditorium at Ann Arbor
High School.
But as yet the proper system
for launching a non-seagoing
vessel hasn't been figured out.
The production men were call-
ed upon at the beginning of the
semester to produce a life-size gon-
dola complete with flat bottom
and stern which could conquer the
waves of the Pattengill Auditor-
ium stage with five passengers
aboard.
SO FAR all they've been able
to do is construct the boat.
The problem of floating it
across the stage in a life-like
manner still remains unsolved.
The first attempts at seaman-
ship were made with roller skates.
The stage-crew fastened several
pairs of skates to the keel of their
wooden masterpiece and started
pulling it across the stage in a
trial run.,
* * *
THIS PROVED unfortunate be-
cause three cast members cut
themselves on the tips of the
skates which had promptly ripped
through the bottom of the boat.
The guiding line wasn't strong
enough, either, and the boat pull-
ed out .of the hands of the crew
and rolled wildly across the floor.
After abandoning the roller-
skates, the group toyed with such
projects as a miniature rail-road
track across the stage, attaching
bicycle wheels to the stage-side of
the ship or hiring a horse to pull
it.
Though stage-crew members are
confident they'll come up with a
solution, society president Gary
Hicks, '51, asked any campus gon-
dola expert who has an idea for
propelling the craft, to contact him
at 2-0249.
"We'll need a lot of people to
push it," he confided, "if they don't
work something out soon."

Re s Fear
U.S.-Siberia
'Move--Gale
The threat of military action
against Red outposts in Eastern
Siberia could bring Russia, the
United States' "implacable ene-
my," to terms, according to Esson
M. Gale, director of the Univer-
sity International Center.
"It is time that American pres-
tige be once more restored, espec-
ially in Asiatic countries," Gale
said recently, speaking before the
Men's Club of the Metropolitan
Methodist Church in Detroit.
The director, a former finan-
cial adviser to the Chinese Na-
tionalist government, urged that
we should not allow victory to
elude us now that "American
military genius has once more sal-
vaged the Pacific area from a
powerful aggressor."
"With one of the most power-
ful striking forces ever assembled
actually now on the East Asiatic
coast and at the disposal of the
United Nations, military opera-
tions could be carried out with
comparative ease from Korean
and Japanese bases against lightly
defended Russian posts such as
Vladisvostok in Eastern Siberia,"
he said.
Gale pointed out that "the mere
threat to Eastern Siberia would
be sufficient to bring the Krefinlin
to terms" because of the showing
made by UN forces in Korea. He
warned that Russia would still be
a menace if the UN accepts an
inconclusive peace in Korea and
withdraws, or places a puppet
government in charge.
Smith To Lecture
On Labor Tonight
Prof. Russel A. Smith, secretary
of the Law School, will address
the Pre-Law Society at 8 p.m., to-
night, in the Hussey Room of the
League.
Prof. Smith will speak on "Labor
Law."
Plans to visit Detroit courtrooms
and penal institutions will be dis-
cussed at the meeting.

More than one million dollars
have been received 'for the Michi-
gan Memorial Phoenix Project
from the Project's combined fund-
raising drives, Phoenix officials
announced yesterday.
"With more than $1,007,000 sub-
scribed, the campaign has just
started to gain momentum," Ches-
ter H. Long, chairman of the na-
tional drive said.
* .* *
HE NOTED. that with nearly
6,000 gifts contributed from Uni-
versity alumni all over the world,
his committee now feels justified
in seeking substantial support
from industry. "We have reached
our first important milestone."
As yet no really "big" dona-
tions have been received from
foundations or industry, al-
though Phoenix officials hope a
number will be on the way soon.
The national drive was schedul-
ed to close at the end of last
month, but because some regional
campaign chairmen had not been
able to fully organize their work-
ers by then, Lang extended the
closing date to the end of this
month.
* * *
LANG ANNOUNCED that Spo-
kane, Wash. leads the nation in
contributions, having received 135
percent of its dollar quota from 65
percent of all alumni in that re-
gion.

-Daily-Burt Sapowitch
REHEARSAL-The University Choir, directed b y Prof. Maynard Klein of the School of Music,
rehearses for today's concert in Hill Auditorium. The 160 voice group will be making its first appear-
ance of the year. It will be accompanied by pianist George Exon, and will feature three soloists
in the final presentation.
Choir presents First Concert Tonight

"Many local committees are
still just getting underway. We
expect big gains as the larger
cities such as New York, De-
troit and Los Angeles contact
more of the alumni in their cit-
ies," he said.
At the same time studelit drive
officials here said that the cam-
pus campaign was off to a good
start. During the first two days
of the drive four house groups
have turned in contributions from
at least 80 percent of their mem-
bers. The average pledge is $30,
drive chairman Mary Lubeck, '51,
said.
Tomorrow 600 student Phoenix
workers will begin the huge task
of contacting every student who
lives in the city outside of an or-
ganized house group.
A CHRISTMAS IS I
NEXT MONTH
PLEASE come in early while
selections are complete and
the help is still in a holiday
mood. We'll give you lots
of time and attention this
month.
L. G. BALFOUR CO.
1319 S. University
Phone 3-1733

Phoenix Project's Drive
Tops Million Dollar Mark

fall

issue of

generation

coming

soon

35c

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MUSIC
" drama
* art
" literature

One hundred sixty voices strong,
the University Chbir will present
the first chorale concert of the
year at 8:30 p.m. today in Hill
Auditorium.
The program, which will be open
to the public free of charge, will
feature works by Bach, Brahms
and Haydn.
Varsity Night
Sell-Out Seen
A sell-out crowd is expected to
attend the University Bands'
twelfth annual Varsity Night, at
8:15 p.m. Friday in Hill Auditor-
ium, Bernard Leutholtz, Grad.,
Band student manager said yes-
terday.
Tickets for Varsity Night are
$.65, and are on sale at local mu-
sic stores, 1020 Administration
Bldg., Harris Hall, the League, the
Union, and from all band mem-
bers. Tickets will also be available
Friday evening at the Hill Box
Office.
Joe Gentile, of radio and tele-
vision fame, will be master of
ceremonies for the program. In-
cluded in the two-hour variety
show will be 10 top-flight pro-
fessional and campus acts.
The Standing Room Only sign
was displayed at last year's show,
run by comedian Robert Q. Lewis.

DIRECTED BY Prof. Maynard
Klein of the School of Music the
Choir has been rehearsing three
times a week in Lane Hall since
the beginning of the semester.
Final rehearsals for tonight's
concert wereaheld in Hill Audi-
torium -to accustom the choris -
ters to the acoustics and stage
of the large hall.
The Choir, an all student group,
is composed mainly of music ma-
jors who receive scholastic credit,
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 5)
Coring Events.
Westminster Guild: Open House,
8:00 p.m., Fri., Nov. 17, First
Presbyterian Church.

for the rehearsal time. The re-
mainder of its members are drawn
from other University schools and
take part on a non credit basis.
SCHEDULED for tonight's pro-
gram are the 16th century French
song "Roaming the Wood" by
Claudin De Semisy, and the im-
pressionistic composition by Fred-
erick Delius, "To be Sung on a
Summer's Night."
Brahm's "Liebesleider, Op. 52,"
accompanied on the piano by
George Exon and Patricia Joy
will be followed by the first Ann
Arbor performance of Heinrich
Schutz' motet "Sing to the Lord
a New Song."
After intermission the choir will
present Bach's motet "The Spirit
Also Helpeth Us:"
The concluding work of the con-
cert, excerpts from Haydn's Ora-
torio "The Seasons," will be pre-
sented by the full choir accompani-
ed by soloists Rose Marie Jun, so-
prano, Charles Stephenson, tenor,
and Jack Wilcox, bass.

I

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MILLER'S DAILY FEATURE
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Salisbury Steak . . . Potato
Salad or Vegetable
Roll and Butter ... Beverage
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Men's Wear
Cooper's Sox
Cooper's Underwear
Bear Brummell Ties
Champ Hats
Shapely Shirts
Sandy McDonald

Mathematics Journal Club: Fri.,
Nov. 18, 3001 Angell Hall, 3 p.m.
Dr. Jane Rothe will discuss the re-
cent issue of the Transactions.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation:
Friday services, 7:45 p.m., Lane
Hall. Speaker: Prof. Joseph E. Kal-"
lenbach, Department of Political )
Science. "Some Reactions to the
Recent Elections." Saturday morn-
ing services, 9:30 a.m., Lane Hall.
Acolytes: Meeting, 7:30 p.m.,
Fri., Nov. 17, ast Lecture Room,
Rackham Bldg. Mr. Mason Myers.
will read a paper on "Objective
Relativism."
Hawaii Club: Business meeting,
Fri., Nov. 17, 7:30 p.m., Room 3-G,
Union. 'Ensian picture will be
taken.
International Radio Round
Table: Auspices of International
Center and WUOM. Discussions
are held every Friday at 2:30 p.m.
(Continued on Page 7)

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