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November 16, 1950 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-16

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.t

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER'16, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE THREE

FOR THE FIRST TIME:
Koceski in Battle for Halfback Position

Bradford Tabbed Back of eek

4'

By TED PAPES
Leo Koceski is ready and waiting
to take up the challenge offered
him by Michigan's new backfield
discovery, Wes Bradford, named
yesterday by the United Press as
Back of the Week.
For the first time in three, years
he finds himself engaged in a bat-
tle for a first string offensive as-
signment.
* * *
BACK IN 1948 Koceski opened
the season in the shadow of Walter
Teninga's magic football reputa-
tion, but he quickly took over the
starting wingback position with his
dazzling style.
From the opening game of
that campaign until this year's'
Army contest he maintained a
monopoly in that spot except for
an interval last season when he
was out with rib fractures. He
yielded finally to the knee in-
jury which eventually gave
Bradford his big opportunity.
Ten years ago; Leo, a Pennsyl-
vania sixth grader, decided he
would come to Michigan.
* * *
SUBSEQUENTLY he turned
down lucrative offers from some
26 colleges which were anxious to
claim the services of this high
school gridiron prodigy who couldk
play halfback out of the 'T' for-
mation, the single or the double
wing.
To make good his sixth grade
threat he had to balk his mo-
ther's wishes. She wanted her
son, dubbed the "Canonsburg
Cannonball," to ' enter West
Point.
One of his best offers was from
Wes Fesler, then the coach at
Pittsburgh. Before Leo graduated,
Fesler was hired by Ohio State,
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
Publication in The Daily Official
Bulletin is constructive notice to all
members of the University, Notices
for the Bulletin should be sent in
typewritten form to the Office. of
the Assistant to the President, Room
2552 Administration Building, by
3:00 p.m. on the day preceding pup~-
lication (11:00 a.m. Saturdays).
THURSDAY, NOV. 16, 1950
VOL. LXI, No. 45

but continued to advise the young- Oosterbaan discovered that the lad
ster to enroll at Pitt. could kick under pressure.
* *t * Teninga was the regular punt-
THAT INCIDENT has given Ko- er in 1948. In the always-critical
ceski the highest regard for the game with Minnesota Ooster-
Buckeye mentor. It has not dull- baan signaled for a punt with
ed his ambition to help upset Ohio Michigan backed against its own
a week from Saturday, however., goal line. He overlooked the fact
The colorful Koceski has had that Teninga was beside him on
many moments of football glory the bench.

O

4 i i' -

Sophomore's Rapid Risel
Creates Back field Puzzle

while wearing his maize and blue
uniform.
His finest offensive showing,
came as a sophomorM two years1
* * *

Quarterback Pete Elliott called
upon the bewildered Koceski who
promptly loftedea 60 yard kick
from deep in his own end zone,
pulling his team out of danger.
* * * anr-
THE KNEE INJURY which de-
railed Leo in the Army game was
a recurrence of the one which cut
him down on the third play of
last year's climatic Ohio State
clash.
He came on to score the touch-
down which eventually netted a
7-7 tie and a share in the Big
Ten Championship. '
And so he anxiously looks for-
ward to the Northwestern encoun-
ter this Saturday and the Buckeye
game a week later, hoping that
his knee will not handicap him in
his quest to regain the top rung
among Michigan right halfbacks.
Oosterbaan must be quite happy
that the wingback shortage is ap-
parently over and that competi-
tion has once again taken com-
mand.
Bruins Win
NEW YORK-(P)-The Bos-
ton Bruins defeated the psy-
chologically-pepped New York
Rangers, 4-3, last night before
8,856 fans, smallest National
Hockey League turnout here in
more than 10 years.

By CY CARLTONj
A young man named Wes Brad-
ford -who only a month ago was
only a small cog in the Wolverine
football wheel now rates as back
of the week, according to the Uni-
ted Press.
Bradford's success, gratifying as
it is to Bennie Oosterbaan and
company creates many problems,
as the Wolverine right halfback
slot which up to two weeks ago
presented a famine is now a horn
of plenty.
* -* *
BEFORE THE Illinois game,
Oosterbaan had only Bradford as
the one,able bodied performer for
Faculty members and teach-
ing fellows who wish to enter a'
singles or doubles handball
tournament should register at
the office of the I-M Building.
-Wilbur Braithwaite,
that position. He now has three
ready to fill that slot with the re-
turn of Leo Koceski and Don Old-
ham to full time duty.
This creates the problem of
what to do with Bradford. The
sophomore from Troy, Ohio, can
obviously not be sent back to
the fourth string halfback spot
as he is now the leading running
back in the Wolverine running
menagerie, with 'an average of
6.2 yards per carry. Koceski is
second with 4.18 yards per try.
Don Dufek, workhorse of the
squad, leads in total yardage, his
bull-like spins having netted 470
yards.
* * *
IN TRYING TO solve the prob-
lem of what to do with Bradford,
Michigan coaches sent various
backfield patterns through signal
drills, with Bradford and Koceski
at wingback. Koceski still favors
his injury, however, and probably
won't start against the Wildcats.
Don Peterson, who performed

At right half for part of the
Illinois game until injured, was
back in his old spot at tailback
behind Chuck Ortmann.
Others who saw much action in
the scrimmage were Ted Toper
and Pete Palmer who worked with
almost .all backfield units, al-
though Bill Putich worked most-
ly with the first string unit.
* * * *
WITH BRADFORD AS the
sparkplug, Michigan's offense is
now beginning to assume propor-
tions to which Wolverine support-
ers have become accustomed.
Chuck Ortmann, now back at
full strength, is far more effec-
tive with proper backfield sup-
port to loosen up the defense
thus making it harder to deal
with both Ortmann's passing
and his now improved running.
NORTHWESTERN brings a po-
tent offense into Ann Arbor, head-
ed by the passing combination of
Dick Flowers to Don Stonesifer.
Flowers is on his way to breaking
several conference passing marks
and Stonesifer has already broken
the Conference record for pass
completions in a game.
These two pose a decided threat
to Michigan and combined with
the Maize and Blue's revitalized
attack should give fans one of the
most exciting games of the year
in Ann Arbor.

Frosh Grid Awards
The 54 letter winners from Michi-
gan's freshman football squad are:
James T. Balog, Richard Balzhiser,
both of Wheaton, Ill.; Homer B.
Beers, Auburn, Ind.; Richard Beison,
East Chicago, Ind.; Don Bennett,
Chicago; Martin Bogarad, Weirton,
West Va.; Stanley Burns, Ann Arbor;
Norman Canty, Oak Park, Ill.; Mat-
thew Carr, East Chicago, Ind.; Con-
stantine Cavalaris, Hamilton, O.;
Frank Celizic, Euclid, O.; Ray Chia-
puzio, Bessemer, Mich.; John Con-
lin, Ann Arbor; William Downey,
Birmingham, Mich.; George Dutter,
Fort Wayne, Ind.; Ronald Eckart,
East Lansing, Mich.; James Gary,
Wheaton, Ill.; Herbert *eyer, To-
ledo, O.; David Goldstick, Great
Neck, N.Y.; James Haluska, Racine,
Wis.;
Charles Heimerding~r, Highland
Park, Ill.; Ercle Herbert, Washing-
ton, D.C.; Ronald Horne, Williston,
N.Y.; Frank Keck II, Champaign,
Ill.; Richard Klein, Toledo, 0.; Eu-
gene Knutson, Beloit, Wis.; Eugene
Kuklinski, East Chicago, Ind.; Rich-
ard Leach, Flint, Mich.; Jack Mc-
Connaughey, Detroit; Paul McDer-
mott, Champaign, Ill.; John Maas,
Detroit; John Matteson, Ann Arbor;
Roger Maugh, Ann Arbor; Curtis
Murton, Harrison, Mich.; Richard
O'Shaughnessy, Seaford, N.Y.; Rich-
ard L. Patterson, Xenia, O.;
Cino Pella, Sudbury, Ont.; 0John
Piirto, Ishpeming, Mich.; William
Rahn, Benton Harbor, Mich.; Char-
les Ritter, Cassopolis, Mich.; Eugene
Rumas, East Chicago; Ind,.; Bronson
Rumsey, Jr., Savannah, Ga.; Joel
Schmidt, Bessemet, .Mich.; Alfred
Schultz, Huntington, Id.; Fhomas
Smith, Detroit; Thad Stanford, Mid-
land, Mich.; John Stevens, Kalama-
zoo, Mich.; John Sullivan, West
Allis, Wis.; Robert Topp, Kalamazoo,
Mich.; Bernard Tresnowski, East Chi-
cago, Ind.; Raymond Vanderzeyde,
East Chicago, Ind.; Ronald Williams,
Massillon, O.; Jack Woods, Lake-
wood, 0.; Richard Yirkosky, Chi-
cago.

11

Offense Meets Defense
As OS U Faces Illinois
Special to The Daily while Illinois ranks as the fifth
CHICAGO-The Big Ten's No. 1 best offensive team. Incidentally,
offensive team, scoring a record each team leads,the Conference in
average of 41.6 points per game, one phase of the other team's'spe-
will meet the Western Conference's ciality. While the Illini,.are un-
questionably the top defensive
No. 1 defensive team, which is per- team, they lead the Conference in
mitting opponents only 3.5 points the most yards per play rushing
per game, when Ohio State plays with a 4.67 average. The Buckeyes
Illinois at Champaign this Satur- pace the Big Ten in a key defen-
day. sive department, yielding only 84.8

According to official statistics
released today the league-leading
Ohio Buckeyes, undefeated in Big
Ten play, dominate the Conference
in most offensive statistical de-
partments. In the defensive line-
tip, the second-place Illini, with
a 3-1 record, holds the same top
position. In virtually every impor-
tant statistical item, each team
countermands the other's strength.
The' Buckeyes rate as the Con-
ference's third best defensive unit

yards per game to the opponeits'
running backs.
Ladies' and Children's
Hairstyling
-- a specialty -
Courteous, experienced personnel
7 Hairstylists-No Waiting
The DASCOLA BARBERS
Liberty near State

r

I

LEO KOCESKI
. . . no small competition
* * *
ago when he delivered three touch-
downs in his team's 28-0 victory
over Northwestern.
HE STARTED this season as the
club's number one punter, and that
recalls to mind the peculiar cir-
cumstances under which coach
Notices
Students, College of Engineer-
ing: The final day for DROPPING
COURSES WITHOUT RECORD
will be Saturday noon, Nov. 18. A
course may be dropped only with
the permission of the classifier
after conference with the instruc-
tor. a
Students, College of Engineer-
ing: The final day for REMOVAL
OF INCOMPLETES will be Sat-
urday noon, Nov. 18. Petitions for
extensioA of time must be on file
in the Secretary's Office on or-be-
fore Saturday noon, Nov. 18.

I

~oshgcOA mopw

I

'L
--

n

Faculty, College of Literature, Sci-
ence, and the Arts: Midsemester
reports are due Fri., Nov. 17, for
those students whose standing at
midsemester is "D" or "E".
Report cards have been distri-
buted to all departmental offices.
Green cards are provided for re-
porting freshmen and sophomores
and white cards for juniors and
seniors. The reports for freshmen
and sophomores should be sent
to the Academic Counselors' Of-
fice, 1210 Angell Hall; those for
juniors and seniors to the Board
of Concentration Advisers' Of-
fice, 1006 Angell Hall.
Students not registered in this
College but who elected L.S:&A.
courses should be reported to the
school or college in which they
are registered.
Additional cards may a obtain-
ed in 1210 Angell Hall o1 006 An-
gell Hall.
Physical Education for Men:
Ice skating classes are scheduled
to begin Mon., Nov. 20, at the coli-
seum. Students may register for
these classes in 4 Waterman Gym.
Sections offered are as follows:
Sect. 19-Mon.Wed.-10:00,
Sect. 20-Tue.-Thu.-10:00
Sect. 21-Mon.-Wed.-11:00
Sect. 22-Tue.-Thu.-11:00
Psi Upsilon Fraternity: The'Uni-
iversity Sub-Committee on Disci-
pline finds that on Nov. 3, 1950,
Psi Upsilon Fraternity held in its
chapter house a social gathering
where intoxicating liquors were
had and that at least twenty-three
couples were present, of which
twenty-three students were mem-
bers of the fraternity and that
nearly all of the swomen present
(Continued on Page 4)

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