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November 09, 1950 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

,SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1950

I I

NO MONASTERY MONOT ANY:
'U' Student Spends Year as Trappist

7

, *

4 .-... - - .. . - -. .

By MARY LETSIS
"A Trappist monastery isn't the
grim place many people think;"
Rank Melton, '52NR, said as he
reminisced about the year he spent
as a Trappist monk.
"Sometimes it was a little like
a western movie," he grinned.
"Especially , when we'd bounce
along in an old manure wagon be-
hind a team of ornery mules. Oc-
casionally someone bounced out of
the wagon on a sharp curve as they
rattled over rugged Kentucky
ridges."
BUT MELTON, who lived at Our
Lady of Gethsemane monastery
near Louisville, Ky., remembers
the serious side of monastery life
as well as the laughs.
Drab denims form the back-
bone of a monk's wardrobe, Mel-
ton noted. "On feast days, how-
ever, when celebrating the Mass,
priests wear gloriously-colored
robes. The satin vestments signi-
fy that those who are beautifully
dressed are close to Christ be-
cause they approach His beauty.
Yet, on the outside, the flashiest
dressers are sometimes the far-
thest away from Him."
Monks live longer than most

--Daily-Pete Arno
HANK MELTON
* * *
people, Melton noted. "The average
life span of monks ranges from 75
to 80. They do not eat meat, fish
or eggs, which are generally
thought necessary to a long, heal-
thy life. They eat vegetables and
fruits in season, as well as whole
wheat bread."

"MONKS ARE allowed to drink
the nation's popular drink," Mel-
ton said. "In Italy, they drink
wine, in Germany, beer, and here
in the United States, it's coffee.
But coffee beans can't be grown
in this country, and we produce
all our own food on the monastery
grounds. So we grew soybeans and
combined them with barley to
make barley water. And that was1
our coffee," he explained.
The work changes from week
to week with the seasons, and.
this relieves the monotony."
A monk's routine begins at 2
a.m. with a visit to the church.
After breakfast, outside labor -on-
tinues until noon dinner. Then
there's more outside labor until
bedtime at 7 p.m. The day's ac-
tivities are frequently punctuated
by prayer and meditation.
* * *
A TOUCHY stomach, aggravated
during the war by Army food, forc-;
ed Melton to leave Our Lady of;
Gethsemane monastery. "It isn't,
uncommon for monks to eat half,
a loaf of long bread and a )acket-;
ful of potatoes and other vcge-
tables at one sitting," he Said. "My
digestive system couldn't' take that
much, and when I ate less after
working so hard, I was still hun-
gry and became weak."
Soon after leaving the m.'as-
tery, Melton said, he returned to
his old habits. "With so many1
distractions, it is impossible to
maintain such peace of -oul as
I found there. My novice-master
warned me that it would happen,
and I found it to be true," he,
confessed.
There are 200 monks in the
Trappist monastery in Kentucky
and about 12 such monasteries in
the United States.
"The movement is rwing r'a-
pidly, Melton.tdeclared, atd
about seven applications a day are
received from men who re anxious1
to become Trappists."

Set Atlantic
Union Meet
.for Today
Newly Formed Group
Open to Student Body
The! newly formed Ann Arbolr
chapter of the Atlantic Union
Committee will hold its first
meeting at 8 p.m. today in Rm. 3A
of the Union.
Primarily held for the purpose
of expanding group membership,
especially to the student body, the
meeting will be open to the pub-
lic.
It will be held under the aus-
pices of the Student Religious As-
sociation,
* * *
THE CHAPTER was formed last
month by thirty faculty members
and Ann Arbor residents as part
of the national committee having
chapters in thirty seven states
and Canada.
The aim of the organization is
to extend federal union princi-
ples over the democratic nations
that are now members of the
North Atlantic Pact.
Its immediate objective is to
have the Atlantic Union resolu-
tion which has been before the
House Foreign Affairs .Commit-
tee since last year, brought before
Congress for instant action.
The aims of the Atlantic Un-
ion differ from that of the United
World Federalists, as the Union
forbids the membership of totali-
tarian governments.
Chairman of the committee,
Prof. Preston Slosson of the "his-
tory department will address the
meeting. He is also faculty advisor
to the student World Federalist
group.

Portrait Parade

Election Results Reveal
Curious Local Sidelights

Campus Ticket Sales Begin
For Varsity Night Program

M4OSCOW DECORATED-Huge portraits of Marx, Lenin, Engels,
and Soviet Premier Stalin decorate the facade of Moscow's
Bolshoi theater where Deputy Premier Nikolai Bulganin de-
livered the official address Nov. 6 on the eve of the 33rd anni-
versary of the Soviet revolution. Bulganin singled out Communist
China for special praise and declared that "Korea has become the
banner of. all oppressed peoples fighting for their liberation."
HUMANIZE MEDICINE:
Broad Pre-Med Education
Stressed b 'U' Psychiatrist

A few interesting local side-
lights on Tuesday's election turned
up yesterday, as vote tabulations
came nearer to completion.
A new county voting record for
an off-year election was estab-
lished despite late afternoon and
evening rains, but officials' early
hopes for an all-time high turn-
out failed to materialize.
Local voters placed the city gov-
ernment in some confusion by en-
thusiastically approving a shorter
E. Ann Arbor
Remains City
In Close Vote
East Ann Arbor, the city which
doesn't want to exist, failed at
the polls Tuesday in a move to dis-
solve.
A petition to disincorporate was
turned down by a margin of 31
votes, as a two-thirds majority
was needed to pass it. The totals
were 439 for and 266 against dis-
incorporation.
The city was incorporated /in
June, 1946. Proponents of disin-
corporation felt that taxes were
too high to counterbalance the ad-
.vantages of "city life."'The city
would have dissolved back into
Pittsfield township from whence
it came, if the petition had
passed in Tuesday's election.
Opponents of the proposal
thought that the services provided
by being, a city were worth the
higher taxation.
The issue was the first of its
kind to come up in Michigan
history. The. Christman-Warner
Bill of 1949 set up the machinery
for disincorporation.
Coffee Hour Today
A student-faculty coffee hour,
sponsored by the Union and Lea-
gue, will be held at 4 p.m. today
in the Terrace Room of the Un-
ion.
The coffee hour offers an op-
portunity for students to meet
members{ of the history depart-
ment facultyon an informal basis.

work week for firemen without
providing funds to accomplish it.
The proposal to raise the tax limit
slightly in order to finance the
expansion made necessary by the
shorter week was voted down.
The Ann Arbor Police Depart-
ment managed to get both Repub-
lican and Democratic precinct
workers on each others' necks ear-
ly Tuesday morning. Because of a
misunderstanding, police confis-
cated many of the small cam-
paign stake-signs placed near the
polls on Tuesday morning by the
workers.
TheDemocrats thought the Re-
publicans had pulled them up; the
Republicans blamed the Demo-
crats. Someone discovered that the
police had-removed the signs,
The police replaced them.
It was evident from a glance at
the precinct totals that, with vot-
ing machines, split ballots are al-
most a thing of the past. In Free-
dom Township, Washtenaw Coun-
ty, for example, out of a total 169
ballots cast fewer than ten were
split. Even in Ann Arbor, where
voting machines have been in use
for several elections, split ballots
were noticeably absent.
In the first precinct of the sec-
ond ward, out of an approximate
1200 ballots cast, there were only
about 70 split ones.
Ohio Bus Tickets
Placed On Sale
Anyone wishing to make bus
reservations to the Ohio State-
Michigan football game at Co-
lumbus can do so this week, ac-
cording to George Benisek, Wol-
verine Club publicity chairman.
Special buses are being charter-
ed which will leave Ann Arbor
early Saturday morning, Nov. 25.
On the return trip, one bus will
leave Columbus shortly after the
game, with a second bus leaving
at 10 a.m. Nov. 26.
Round-trip fare for both groups
is $8.50, and reservations can be
made until Nov. 17 at the Student
Affairs window in the lobby of
the Administration Bldg.
No game tickets are available
with transportation reservations,
Benisek emphasized.

Tickets are now on sale for the
twelfth annual Varsity Night to be
held Nov. 17 in Hill Auditorium.
The gala variety show, always
a campus favorite, will be preceded
by an all-campus pep rally for the
Northwestern .game the following
day.
RADIO COMICS Joe Gentile
and Ralph Bingay of the dawn
hour program Early Morning Fro-
lics from WJBK will emcee the two
hour star-studded variety show.
Comedy Magician Karol Fox,
the King/of Korn, and comedy
juggler Danny Daniels will be the
two other professional perform-
ers. Seven studlent acts have al-
ready been chosen by Prof. Wil-
liam D. Revelli, conductor of the
University Bands and director of
the show.
The proceeds from Varsity Night
are used by the three University

AMONG the student performers
chosen are: an acrobatic ballet by
Patricia Herman; a barbershop
quartet composed of law students,
James Kendall, Vern Witham, Bob
Rizley and Phil Robertson; and a
midget act by Marjorie Ingram and
Suzanne Rose.
Other student performers will
be instrumentalists, B e v e r 1y
Shuber, Patty Joy and Margaret
King, and a jazz combo, Bob
Leopold and his Dixieland Five.
Several more student acts are
still being considered for the pro-
gram.
Tickets are now on sale at lo-
cal music and record shops, the
Union, the League, Harris Hall,
the Administration Building and
from all Band members.
Last year's show, emceed by ra-

Stressing that today's doctors
must treat their patients as total
personalities, Dr. Herbert T.
Schmale of the University Hospi-
tal's psychiatric department told
the Pre-Med Society last night
that they must try to broaden their
education.
"Concentrating on the labs and
not on the humanities has caused
many of today's doctors. to be
trained technicians but not men
that understand their patients,"

REJECT TOOL KIT:
Coeds, Government Disagree
On Idea for Ideal' Bridal Gift
________*7

To prepare themselves properly
for the field, Dr. Schmale advised
that pre-med students take four
years of preparatory work instead
of three.
But Dr. Schmale also said that
much can be done while the stu-
dent is in medical school. "Here at
Michigan," he said, "students have
some psychiatric work in each of'
their four years of medical stu-
dies."
Dr. Schmale emphasized that the
heart of Medical School teaching
is that the doctor should handle
himself so as not to arouse the
patient's anxiety.
Dr. Schmale spoke on the "Psy-
chological Factors in Medicine," in
the Chemistry Bldg. lecture hall.

Dr. Schmale said.
HE EXPLAINED

that "one

i
r

Bands, the Marching, the Concert, dio comedian Robert Q. Lewis per-
and the Varsity, to aid in carrying formed to a standing-room-only
on their, year's activities, audience.

Tired of Walking to Lunch?
Let J. D. Miller give you a ridL.
Bus to J. D. Miller's Cafeteria
Le'aves Bus Ad. Bldg. - 12:01
Leaves Engine Arch - 12:05
Eat Lunch at J. D. Miller's
and board return bus at 12:45.

DAME MYRA HESS

Most engaged. coeds on campus
apparently do not. put much store
in government suggestions for the
"ideal" bridal gift.
At least, the recent suggestion
that a tool kit would be just the
thing for the newlywed woman
has met with much dissatisfaction
from campus-brides-to-be.
THE IDEA came from Earl Mc-
'MacBeth Film
To Begin Today
Orson Welles' widely discussed
production o f Shakespeare's
"Macbeth" will begin a three day
run at 8 p.m. today, at the Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre.
The film, which originally had
Welles displaying one of the
strongest Scotch burrs ever por-
trayed, 'has been toned down con-
siderably because of the criticism
it received.
Reviews for the film have been
varied,''but according to the Har-
ward Crimson it is "an exciting,
superior movie with moments of
brilliance."
All seats are reserved and sell
for $375. Seats "are still available
for tonight's show.
Exhibit 'U' Prints
Three prints from University
art collections are currently ap-
pearing in an exhibit, "American
Processional," at the Concoran
Gallery of Art in Washington,D.C.
The Clements Library has loan-
ed "Party for Commodore Perry
at the Yokahama Entertainment
House, Honshi' Province," and
"The Indian Summer."
An oil painting, "Indians At-
tacking' an EArigrant Train,".
has been loaned by the University
Museum of Art.

Cracken, household equipment-
expert for the U.S. Department of$
Agriculture. He said the kit should
be complete with- a hammer, two
screw drivers (one large, one lit-
tle), a medium sized pair of pliers,
and a six-nch crescent wrench.
They are to come assembled
in a neat, handy holder, so that
they will be easily accessable
in time of emergency.
Reactions to the suggestion var-
ied from incredulity to hedged ap-
proval of the idea, with few wo-
men agreeing that such a kit
would be any kind of a gift.
* * *
SUE BEEBE, '52 A&D, was
downright hostile to the idea. "I
don't think it's much of a gift,".
she said. "I'd rather get extra-
vagant and frivolous stuff; we can
always eke out the bare necessi-
ties."
"It's a foul idea for a gift,"
Joyce Baker, '51, commented.
"And even if I did get one, I
wouldn't know how to use the
tools," she added.
Ginny Gray, '51 Ed., thought
that such a gift would be useful,
but, "there. are lots of other things
I'd rather get,". she said. "A toas-
ter. or a waffle iron 'would be
more up my alley; besides I think
it's better for the man to be the
fixer," she said.
But McCracken's idea was up-
held by Barbara Jacobi, '51, "I
think it is a novel and very cute
idea for a gift," she said. "It
would certainly be very useful, and
I wouldn't mind if I got one at
all," she maintained.

prime need in medical education
is to broaden the educational base
of the medical student before he
goes to medical school.
"We must teach students that
they are dealing with people and
not with kidney stones."
CHICAGO COLLEGE of
OPTOMETRY
Nationally Accredited
An Outstanding College in
a Splendid Profession
Entrance requirement
thirty hours of Liberal
Arts credits. Advanced
standing granted for
additional L.A. credits.
Next Class Starts
February 12
Excellent clinical fa-
cilities. Recreational
and athletic activities.
Dormitories on campus.
Approved for veterans.
350 Belden Ave,.
Chicago 14, Ill.

I

BRITISH PIANIST
EXTRA SERIES
ALL-BEETHOVEN
PROGRAM
Tues., Nov. 14, 8:30
Hill Auditorium
Tickets: $3.00-$2.40-$1.80.
UNIVERSITY
MUSICAL SOCIETY
Burtori Memorial Tower

TYPEWRITERS
Rented
Sold
Bought
Repaired
G..Requisitions.
Accepted on Supplies only
MORRI LL'S
314 5. State Ph. 7177
fountain pens repaired

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Q.
4'
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V

HOT
FUDGE
SUNDAE
Friday Only
17c
WITH COUPON

,'

FAB
25c
LIMIT ONE

No Rinse

PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S * PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S *

I

WIMBERLY
PIPES
$2-$5 Val.
$1.29
LIMIT ONE

I

I

MYRA HESS

Finland Chorus - November 28
Solomon - November 20

I

r-------

SLACKS!!

I

SLACKS!!
SLACKS!!

'WITH
. f
r. MIC IGAN
MEN
its Alwas

A,. Large
assortment of

BALL POINT
PEN and
PENCIL
both $1"
LIMIT ONE SET
WE HAVE THEM
SMs and5s
Flash Bulbs
16c ea.

Cleansing
TISSUES
200s
LIMITED QUANTITY
6 BARS
PALMOLIVE
IN
Plastic Bag
49c,
LIMIT ONE
LARGE
HERSHEY
BARS
2 for 35c
LIMIT TWO
60c

POPULAR BRANDS
CIGARETTES
$1.79
Carton, Plus Tax
LIMIT ONE
79c
SHOWER
SPRAY
Discontinued Line
49C
SUPER SPECIAL
SET OF 8
Tumblers
98c
LIMITED QUANTITY
AMERICAN
THERMOS'
BOTTLES
$2.50 Val.
$1.59
One to a Customer

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the newest styles
and colors ...
GABARDINES

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