100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 05, 1950 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


SUNDAY, NOVEMBER '5, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 5, 1950 PAGE SEVEN

Defeat
Bruins End
Husky Bowl
Bid Dreams
Richter Sparks
Bear Defensive
SEATTLE - ()) - A meaty, .
mighty California Bear crushed
Don Heinrich and the Rose Bowl
hopes of Washington yesterday,
flashing unexpected passing power u
to earn a 14 to 7 Pacific Coast
Conference football victory before
a record crowd of 55,000.>
It was Washington's first con- -
ference loss this year.
TWO GRINDING touchdown
drives by California in the second "
and third quarters each stretching
just under 65 yards sapped the
Washington strength and got the
Bears over their toughest hurdle
to date in the march toward the
conference crown and the Rose
Bowl.
Rocked into grogginess, Wash-
ington still had enough left for
a late game, 89-yard march that
finally ended when Pete Groger SQ
stol the ball out of Heinrich's
hand on the California two yard Co
line. fie
It was the second key play by
the big California center who hadin'
intercepted a Heinrich pass to
check a second quarter drive.
Huge, loose-limbed Les Richter,
225-pound California guard, spent 1
the afternoon rushing and crush-
ing Heinrich. With the Washing-
ton passing ace bottled, California
unveiled a pitching star of its own t
in quarterback Jim Marinos. His Mict
tosses to Bob Minahen and John Mic
Olszewsk picked up long chunks baan
of yardage in the California drives. the1
wors
Lions Rall;Oost
y lines
Nort
p Cornell they
the
By One Point *W
fact
NEW YORK - (P) - Underdog cove:
Columbia upset Cornell's defending for s
Ivy League Champs yesterday, 20- baan
19 on a dramatic last period touch- cont
down by fullback Howie Hansen into
and Al Ward's conversion, soak
Supposed to lose by 14 points, I
Columbia came from behind to tha
snatch this, tingling rain-swept
contest from fornell's grasp with
less than fiveminutes to go.
« . a F
TRAILING'19-13, with time run-
ining out, Bob Ott squirmed atop
Rocco Calvo's fumble to give Co- Pr
lumbia its, big break, on the Cor- no
nell 36. M
After a Mitch Price-Don Mc- Bu
Lean pass was good for a first sity
down on the 18, Hansen took B
over. Hammering the line five Le
times in six plays, the stocky Te
line-buster smashed over from D
one foot out at 10:32. A
Most of the 20,000 Baker Field leya
customers went slightly off base Ca
as Al Ward trotted out to add and
the all-important winning point R
by placement. Pe
Price was red hot with his pass- Pi
ing in the first half with
two touchdown throws but Cor-

nell's Bill Scazzero, a sub for ail- K
ing Bob Engel, scampered for two Ce
scores that evened matters. Illin
After a scoreless third period, Bu
Jeff Fleischmarm jarred over from Cii
the 1, the eighth play in a 65- Oh
yard drive, and Cornell was on ion9
top. It looked like the ball game. M
Then came Calvo's fumble and Tech
Columbia went to town. Ne
IoN
PRO HOCKEY Dr
Boston 3, Montreal 2 So
Toronto 2, New York 2 Al

Dims

Michigan

Bowl

H oes

'M'm- Illini Statistics

* * *

* ! *

* * *

Elliot's Gridders Sniff Roses
After 7-0 Victory In Snow
Lone Illini Pass Completion Nets Only TD;
Raklovits-Led Ground Attack Baffles 'M'

MICHIGAN
First Downs ............. 8
Rushing Yardage .......119
Passing Yardage ......... 12
Passes Attempted ........ 11
Passes Completed .. ,...... 1
Passes Intercepted ....... 0
Punts................... 14
Punting Average ......... 34.4
Fumbles Lost ......... 2
Yards Penalized .......... 40

- ILLINOIS
First Downs............. 9
Rushing Yardage .........220
Passing Yardage.......... 6
Passes Attempted ........ 2
Passes Completed ,....1
Passes Intercepted ....... 0
Punts ...... ........ 11
Punting Average..... 38.0
Fumbles Lost ............ 2
Mards Penalized......... 30

(Continued from page 1)
ines might pull one of their goal
line stands.
But here a defensive boner cost
Michigan a possible tie.
THE WOLVERINES had stopped
the first two goal line thrusts with
a six man line and five backers
".:close up. All Illinois quarterback
" #: C: Fred Major had to do was send
. :a pair of ends 10 yards out and
? ~ lob a pass. He did just that-Tony
Klimek grabbed it, Sam Rebecca
kicked the point and the day's
scoring was over.
Only a 33 yard scamper by
Stevens kept the play before the
touchdown from being complete
boredom. Laz and Tony Mom-
sen matched punts until Dick
Raklovits notched the game's
;initial first down on two quick-
«:;::;;;.openers. The game was 14 min-
utes old.
Apparently inspired, Stevens cut
--Daily-Roger Reinke over guard and got fine blocking
stopped after a short gain by Joe to re. hn Peteson thrne l2a ma
yer. The slush which covered the between Stevens and the goal line
ng down the Michigan backfield. made the tackle. Peterson stayed
down and never returned to the
line-up.
The Illini drive stalled and
Michigan notched their opening
first down with the second period
1925 G afour minutes old. They reached
the 47, but Ortmann quick kicked
into the end zone. Illinois took
Charlie Ortmann. That doesn't the slippery oval and roared the
take anything away from the tre- length of the field in 12 plays.
mendous defensive performance The winners made one more first
that the Illini put on though. down, but the half ended three
plays later.

rolled dead on the Illinois 11
yard line to give Michigan its
first real break midway through
the third period. Roger Zatkoff
paritally blocked Laz' punt and
Michigan had the pill on the
visitors 35.
A holding penalty halted this
Michigan drive, but Wes Bradford,
running his first play of collegiate
football, raced 21 yards a few min-
utes later to tee off another Michi-
gan drive. The Wolverine ground
attack again failed and Ortmann
quick kicked.
A sliced punt gave the Wolver-
ines their last chance at the start
of the final stanza. Once again
three running plays failed, and
Momsen dropped back to punt.
* * *
HERE IT was that the distance
of one foot gave Illinois the ball-
game and cost Michigan a tie.
Momsen toed the oval on a high
spiral inside the Illinois 10; the
ball landed and skipped for cof-
fin corner, but the English so su-
sceptive to a pigskin took the pill
inside the endzone after it had
just missed the red flag.
Illinois continued their tactics
of first, second and third down
punting and Michigan responded
with a weak running attack. The
Ilini recovered an Ortmann
fumble deep in Michigansterri-
tory to give the fans a last min-
ute warmer, but Raklovits gave
the ball right back.
Michigan couldn't move, and the
game ended a few plays later.
PAID ADVERTISEMENT

IT'S A FACT!

It RAINS in Ann Arbor

Be Ready for it with

JUEEZE PLAY-Don Peterson, Wolverine right halfback, being
le (56) Illinois center and an unidentified Orange and Blue play
ld and shown all too clearly here, was a major factor in slowin
VO# FOOLING:
Cold Brings Memories of

These RAINWEAR Items

By BOB SANDELL
Associate Sports Editor
was no picnic in snow swept
higan Stadium yesterday, but
verine Coach Bennie Ooster-
can recall of a game when
playing conditions were even
e.
was way back in 1925 when
erbaan was making the head-
as an All-American end.
hwestern was in town and
managed a 3-2 triumph over
Michiganders in a complete
npour.
* * *
THAT MADE it worse was the
that the field had not been
red and it hd been raining
several days previous. Ooster-
remembers that after the
est the players walked straight
the showers with their mud-
ed uniforms still on.
t may not have been quite
t bad yesterday, but anybody

that shivered through the full
60 minutes will readily agree
that the day was a bit unusual
for a gridiron spectacle.
Other than the above story

Oosterbaan didn't have much to ELIOT THOUGHT of the game
say after the game. The loss just as a genuine team victory and
about knocks the Wolverines out naturally was pleased with the
of contention for the Rose Bowl, way Don Stevens replaced the
not to mention the Big Ten title. injured All-American candidate
Johnny Karras.

BUT WHAT could anybody say
about it? You couldn't blame the
team with conditions like that.
Michigan is admittedly a passing
team and the visibility and damp-
ness made that impossible.
Bennie wouldn't admit it, but
the field as it was probably ham-
pered an aerial game much more
than a running attack which
was Illinois' chief weapon.
Coach Ray Eliot of the Illini
readily admitted that it was nol
day for the likes of a passer likeI

Stevens along with hard hit-
ting fullback Dick Raklovits ac-
counted for all but seven of Illi-
nois 220 yards on the ground.
Stevens had 91 yards in 17 tries
and Raklovits picked up 122 in
27 attempts.
The right halfback jinx again
plagued the Wolverines yesterday.
Don Peterson, who had taken over
in place of Leo Koceski and Frank
Howell, reinjured his knee in the
first quarter. He was replaced by
Don Oldham who promptly got
his knee banged up early in the
second half.
Finally Sophomore Wes Brad-
ford got his first chance in a
college game and it can be said
he turned in a creditable first
game performance.
The only other 'injury was a
black eye to Ozzie Clark. More
encouraging was the report that
Koceski should be ready next
week.

THE GAME'S tempo picked up
the minute fans had settled down
for the second half's activities. It
was then that Chuck Ortmann
made his lone contribution to the
Michigan offense, rambling 20
yards to the Illinois 45. Ozzie Clark
missed a block or the blonde tail-
back might have gone all the way.
Ortmann's ensuing quick kick
* * *
Lsine-Ups

College Grid Scores

MICHIGAN
Perry .......
Clark
Johnson ....;
Hess
Pederson
Kinyon...''
Jackson
Powers
McWilliams
Momsen ....
Kreager
Pad jen
Wolter .....

Pos. ILLINOIS
LE ..... Klimek
Wodziak
LT ...... Ulrich
Mueller.
Elsner
LG ...... Cahill
Studley
Murphy
Smith
C ..... Vohaska
Sabino
Cole
Hall
Boerio
RG ...... Brown

EAST
inceton 45, Brown 7
oly Cross 26, Harvard 7
aine 26, Colby 7
ucknell 41, New York Univer-
7
owdoin 13, Bates 0
high 42, Muhlenberg 13
mple 39, Delaware 0
artmouth 7, Yale 0
merican International 25, Wes-
n7
rnegie Tech 21, Washington
Jefferson 14
utgers 15, Brown 12
nn State 20, Boston College 13
ttsurgh 21, West Virginia 7
* * *
MIDWEST
ansas 39, Utah 26
sntral Michigan 26, Northern
)is State 14
ena Vista 40, Tarkio (Mo.) 7
rncinnati 23, Ohio University 0
hio Wesleyan 27, Mount Un-
9
Acalester (Minn.) 7, Michigan
h6
braska 40, Missouri 34
wa State 13, Kansas State 7
ake 42, Bradley 14
uth Dakota 14, Iowa State 7
ma 7, Albion 0

S

SOUTH

TO THE VOTERS
SECOND
CONGRESSIONAL DIST.
. As former teachers of George
Meader, an honor graduate of the
Law School of the University of
Michigan, whose subsequent pro-
fessional career we have followed
closely, the undersigned urge the
voters of the Second Congressional
District to vote for him as Re-
publican candidate for' Congress.
Mr. Meader is an able and ex-
perienced practicing lawyer. His
term as Washtenaw County's Pros-
ecutor was marked by vigorous,
but fair enforcement of the law
after prompt and thorough inves-
tigation of the facts. Mr. Meader's
service as Counsel for the United
States Senate War Investigating
Committee (The Truman-Mead
Committee) and the Senate Sub-
committee investigating the Re-
construction Finance Corporation
(the Fulbright Committee) earned
him the praise of all the members
-whatever their party affiliations.
Mr. Meader will not be an ordi-
nary "first term" congressman;
his successful experience in Wash-
ington will enable him to represent
our District most effectively.
All voters-Republican, Demo-
cratic and Independent-can vote
for George Meader for Congress
with full confidence that they will
be represented by a man of integ-
rity, ability, good judgment, and
experience.
RALPH W. AIGLER, GROVER C.
GRISMORE, PAUL A. LEIDY,
EDSON R. SUNDERLAND, and
JOHN E. TRACY.
PAID ADVERTISEMENT

. ..I:7, ...
:/ } i ' -:"' " {. ::'
A~ }t.*
rF

S995

to$99

{

Officer s

Style

TRENCH
COATS

Alabama 14, Georgia 7
Virginia 34, The Citadel 14
V.M.I. 46, Davidson 6
Mississippi State 27, Auburn 0
Kentucky 40, Florida 6
Washington and Lee 25, Virginia
Tech 7
Maryland 23, George Washing-
ton 7
Duke 30, Georgia Tech 21
North Carolina State 7, Rich-
mond 0
Tennessee 16, North Carolina 0
Washington (Md.) College 32,
Hampden Sydney 27
* *
WEST
Baylor 20, Texas Christian 14
Tulsa 27, Oklahoma A&M 13
Rice 13, Texas Tech 7
Oklahoma 27, Colorado 18
Wyoming 14, Idaho 7
Colorado College 27, Western
(Colo.) State 18
San Francisco 24, Denver 6
Washington State 21, Oregon 13

Big Ten
Standings

Wahl .......RT
Ohlenroth
Strozewski
Allis ........RE
Pickard
Putich .......Q9
Palmer
.Topor

Lynch
Gnidovic
. . . Siegert
Al Tate
. Fox
Jones
,..... Major

PLASTIC RAINCOATS

$2-99

W L T Pct.

Ohio State
Wisconsin
Illinois
Michigan
Iowa
Northwestern
Indiana
Minnesota
Purdue\

4
4
2
1
2
1
1
0
0

0
1
1
1
3
2
2
3
2

0
0
0
1
0
0
0
1
0

1.000
.800
.667
.500
.400
.333'
.333
.143
.000

P
189
81
33
33
74
26
34
13
28

Op.
35
52
7
27
138
52
53
91
66

--p

Ortmann,

i1

Oldham .
Peterson
Witherspo
Bradford
Dufek ...
Zatkoff

.... LH ......Clark
Bachouros
Douglass
Rebecca
... RH ..... Brosky
Neathery
ion Laz
Stevens
... FB ... Raklovits
Popa
W. Tate

BARGAINS in

RUBBER FOOTWEAR

(Tie counts half game won, half
game lost.

OVERSHOES
Zipper or Four-Buckle

JACKETS

BOOK, BARGAINS

r.

ALL STATE
AUTO INSURANCE CO.
Sear's Roebuck & Co. Bldg.
312 SouTH MAIN ST., Ann Arbor, Mich.

I..

All Wool With
Warm Quilted
Linings!

BLACK

$495

I

Hundreds of used books from

old Libraries

Phone 2-5501

MR. LYONS, Agent

$1095

consisting

of

TOE RUBBERS

-n

Text and Reference

Books,

EVERY MONDAY - 9:30 A.M. to 5:30 P.M.
LET YOUR OWN qOMPARISON
PROVE THE DIFFERENCE.

'a.

Black

$149.

*
"i
C

Long Surcoat Style!
Full Zipper Fronts!
Smart Two-Tones!

Language, Mathematics,

RONSON LIGHTER
Ladies' and Men's Lighters
n Red - Blue - Brown

I

f Maroon, Grey, Blue,
Grey-Green, Grey

Novels, Biography and
sorted Subjects.
THIS WEEK ONLY

as-

FOR THE LADIES, TOO

STATION WAGON

I

$495

Also

Raincoats .., size 34 only

Corduroys
Rayons

"The Biggest Little Store in the World"

11

11

at Prices you

I

5 1 1 iv UlY ~

lawn

9

U

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan