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November 03, 1950 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-03

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six

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRMAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1950

SIX FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 3, 1950
I I U

TALK ON EUROPE:
Reporter Blair Moody
To Speak Here Today,
4> * * *

Blair Moody, Washington cor-
respondent of the Detroit News,
will discuss his recent European
tour at 3 p.m. today in Rackham
Amphitheatre.
His talk, "Building Strength for
Freedom," will be the second in
the series of University lectures in
journalism. The veteran reporter
will describe the Washington con-
ference of the Allied Chiefs of
Staff and the meeting of the At-
lantic defense pact .ministers,
which he has covered in the past
week.
Moody visited Britain and the
western Europe on his three-week
tour to sound out these nations on
their attitudes toward rearma-
ment under the Atlantic Defense
Pact.
The correspondent joined the
staff of the Detroit News in 1923
as a general reporter. Later he
specialized in political and gov-
ernmental reporting, covering the
Detroit City Hall beat. This ex-
perience led to his appointment
to the News Washington bureau in
1933.
Since 1939 he has devoted much
of his time to the study of inter-
national affairs. He has made
several trips to Great Britain and
western Europe to observe and in-
terpret economic and social con-
ditions.
Besides his daily news dispatch-
es from the nation's capital,
Moody writes a daily column,
"Low-Down on Washington." Re-
cently he has gained national re-
cognition for his radio and tele-
vision program,

Educator
Says Home
Threatened
The home has been "pushed
around" by modern industrial so-
ciety, Bonaro Overstreet, eminent
leader in adult education, said
yesterday.
Addressing the final session of
the Parent Education Institute,
Mrs. Overstreet asserted that the
changes brought about by the in-
dustrial revolution have taken
away from the home many of its
traditional functions and given
them to "professional institu-
tions."
Part of the difficulties of to-
day's chlildren, the nationally-
known author-lecturer continued,
lies in the "conflicting values"
which the child sees about him.
It is important to children that
the adult world does not "practice
what it preaches" in religion and
democracy, she explained.
"We must strive to build' a
greater unity in the institutions
to which we entrust our children,"
Mrs. Overstreet said. "We can at
least see. that they teach a con-
sistent system of values," she
added.
Plan Theatre Trip
Tickets for the Union's $5 trip
to the Detroit showing of "Okla-
homa!" Wednesday are on sale
at the Union Student Offices.
Buses will leave the Union at
7 p.m. and return at 11:45 p.m.
Women may get late permission.

PHOENIX CANCER FUND:
Alumnae Will Found Lloyd Me morial

A living memorial to Dean Alice
Lloyd will be established by the
40,000 alumnae of the University
in conjunction with the Michigan
Memorial Phoenix Project.
Co-chairmen of the memorial's
steering committee, Mary Ten-
nant, of Summit, N.J., and Hilda
Kirby, of New York City, announ-
ced plans for the project and
names of committee members yes-
terday.
THE MEMORIAL will be in the
form of a foundation for the study
of cancer. The idea was approved
by the Alumnae Council last
week.
Dean Lloyd died of cancer
this March after serving the
University for nearly 34 years,
The foundation will be a part of
the Phoenix Project, although
funds collected for it in conjunc-
tion with national Phoenix alum-
ni campaign now in progress will
be spent entirely for research in
cancer and similar diseases. Con-
tributions will be collected from
alumnae as their gift to Phoenix.

DEAN LLOYD graduated from
the University in 1916 and served
as a probation officer while train-
ing as a nurse during the next 10
years.
In 1926 she became Adviser of
Women. She was appointed
Dean of Women in 1930, and
served in that capacity until her
death.
Florence Ruthven will serve as
honorary chairman of the mem-
orial.

More than 60 alumnae from
the nation over will serve on the
steering committee.
Deborah Bacon, who succeeded
Dean Lloyd as Dean of Women;
Vera Baits, of the Board of Re-
gents; Sarah Blanding, president
of Vasar College; Vera Brown, no-
ted newspaper columnist; and sev-
eral wives of University faculty
members will work on the com-
mittee.
Read Daily Classifieds

;(

"o

4

BLAIR MOODY
of the Detroit News
'U' Museum Will
Show Nature Film
A special movie entitled "Birds
of the Seashore" will be given at
7:30 p.m. today in the Auditor-
ium of the Kellogg Institute under
the auspices of the University Mu-
seums.
The colored film is being made
available to the Museums in ad-
vance of lecture engagements by
the Canadian Wildlife Service.
Prof. George Sutton, research
consultant in the Museum of Zo-
ology, will narrate important
scenes of the. silent film.

EX 'U' PROVOST-John Perkins, until last week assistant pro-
vost at the University, took over the University of Delaware
presidency Wednesday. Joan McCain, secretary of the University
of Delaware Student Government, shows President Perkins the
campus memorial to the state's World War I dead.'
Cleveland Orchestra To Play

Miller's Special Luncheon
Offered Every Noon
J. D. MILLER'S CAFETERIA
211 South State Street

The Cleveland Orchestra will
make its 13th appearance here at
8:30 p.m. Sunday, in Hill Audi-
torium.
George Szell, conductor, has
chosen Mozart's Serenade in D
major, "With the Post Horn," to
open the program. Sponsored by
the Choral Union, the concert will
be the third in this season's ser-
ies.
In addition to the standard in-
strumentation of the third move-

ment, the work utilizes the "post
horn," an instrument now con-
sidered obsolete. In a modern or-
chestra its place is usually taken
by the trumpet.
After the intermission, Mahler's
Fourth Symphony in G major will
be played. In the fourth move-
ment of this symphony Mahler
employs a soprano vocal, which
will give verses from a collection
of old German songs.

Amw
BOOK

I

DAILY

OFFICIAL BULLETIN

Il

CAMPUS COPS
ATTENTION
We'll need you to hold back the crowds
for the last big day that Wolverine Club
Sensational, "Listen .and Remember,"
records be available.
--- -.-------------.----- .--.-
This coupon will assure you-
a place in the line at the
Administration Building, Friday,
Nov. 3, 2-5 P.M.
L--------------------------
Sorry - only one to a customer.

ft
t.

k, -11

I

(Continued from }Page 4)
Technique session, 4-6 p.m. Bar-
bour Gym.
Canterbury Club: 4-6 p.m., Tea
and Open House.
C.E.D. Meeting, 4:15 p.m., Un-
ion. An extremely important
meeting. It is vital that all dele-
gates attend. If possible, come
prepared to remain until 7 p.m.
Lane Hall Coffee Hour, 4:30-6
p.m. Guest: Ma Aye, leader in the
Student Christian Movement of
Burma.
University Museums Program
for Friday Evening: "Water Birds
of Michigan and Other States."

"Inside Forbidden Tibet"
IT'S IN THE NEWS-SEE IT IN PICTURES!

Colored motion picture, "Birds of
the Seashore," issued by the Na-
tiona:1 Film Board of Canada. 7:30
p.m., Kellogg Auditorium. Nar-
rator: Dr. George M. Sutton, Re-
search Consultant in the Museum
of Zoology. Exhibits of water birds
on the 3rd and 4th floors, Mu-
seums building, open to the pub-
lic from 7 to 9.
Graduate Outing Club: Co-ed
Sports Nite. Meet at Intramural
Building at 7:30 p.m. for volley-
ball, badminton, swimming. Bring
sneakers, gym togs, swim suits,
University Identification Card.
Activities open to newcomers.
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation:
Friday services at 7:45 p.m.: Sab-
bath morning services at . 9:30
a.m., Sat., Lane Hall.
Lutheran Student Association
Party: 7:30 p.m. at the Student
Center, 1304 Hill St. Ping-Pong
Tournament and other games.
Wesley Foundation: "Pie in the
Eye" party, 8 p.m., Wesley Foun-
dation. A small fee charged for
the D.P. fufid.
Newman Club: Open House, 8-
12 p.m. Entertainment and re-
freshments. All Catholic students
and guests invited.
Young Progressives of America:
Party, 8:30 p.m., League.
Westminister Guild: Sadie Hak-
kins Party, 8:30 p.m., at The First
Presbyterian Church.
Young Democrats: Urgent meet-
ing for few minutes outside Mi-
chigan Union, 4:15. Election Day
and Election Eve assignmepts will
be given out. If you cannot make
the meeting, arrange to call the
President at 7463, for information.
The Congregational, Disciple,
Evangelical and Reformed Guild
will have Square Dancing, 9:10 p.-
m., at the Congregational Church,
State and E. William.
Coming Events
Hostelers: Overnight bike hike
to Saline this Saturday. Fun, and

educational too, as a visit to a
flour mill of the pre-Civil era
will be made. Contact immediately
Mary Conover, No. 2-7971 for time
of meeting.
Wesley Foundation: Come to the
the, Hamburg Fry after the game
at the Wesley Foundation, Sat-
urday.
University of Michigan Soaring
Club: Flying at Washtenaw Air-
port, Sun., Nov. 5. Call Jim Clark,
ph. 38398, for further information.
Newman Club: General meeting
and movie, Sun., Nov. 5, 3 p.m. A
vote will be taken to amend the
Constitution. ALL members please
attend.
Le Cercle Francais: Meeting,
Mon., Nov. 6, 8 p.m., Michigan
League. Ensian picture will be
taken.
Lowell Thomas, Jr. Tickets Now
On Sale-Hill Auditorium box of-
fice is open 10 a.m.-5 p.m. for the
sale of Thomas tickets. Mr. Tho-
mas brings his timely colored mo-
tion pictures on Tibet to Hill Au-
ditorium next Tues., 8:30 p.m., as
the third number on the 1950-51
Lecture Coutse. With his pic-
tures, he will tell the story of Ti-
bet as he saw it last year with his
famous father.
PORTRAITS
and
GROUP
PHOTOGRAPHS "
Phone 2-2072a
208 Mich. Theatre Bldg.
- - - - - - - - - - - -

State Street at North U.

I

I

'S

TODA

at

Tuesday, Nov. 1

- 8:30 P.M.

Another

in Ann Arbor
508 East William Street

LO WELL THOMAS, Jr.

Cheer-leader from

Hear his story of this never-never land; roof
of the world. One of the great adventure
stories of our time!
Tickets $1.50 - $1.20 - 60c (tax incl.)
Box Office open 10-5
1950-51 LECTURE COURSE - HILL AUDITORIUM

Ann Arbor's UNIVERSITY MUSIC HOUSE
R C'I

41-

P9

or

Plays through any
radio, phonograph
or television
set.

°6 II

at the

i

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CORRECTION
of Ad appearing in Thursday's Daily
Shirts, each additional ................17c
Handkerchiefs, each additional . ...... 34
Socks, pair, each additional ............ 3c
10% discount on dry cleaning

K
'p
{

TROJAN
LAUNDRY & CLEANING, Inc.

.1

AND NOW YOU GET
6w = mWH YOU BUY THIS "45" RECORD CHANGER
ALL FOR ONLY

I

ifcAh Thk
9-12 P.M. November 3

6

SHORES'FARMS RESTAURANT
M-1 1 ROUTE 2 % Mile West of Manchester
Roast Chicken...87c

" RRMH6O,,N
*ONE RECORD A MONTH FOR 6 MONTHS

THE REGULAR PRICEOEF
TUIC PUABUMS AMCAI

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