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November 02, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-11-02

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haone THE MICHIGAN DAILY T

URSDAY, NOVEMBER 2, 1950

Dorr Backs.
Firm Policy
In Germany
The United States must be pre-.
pared to "get tough" with Ger-
many and France if it is to carry
out its present policy of making
Germany a partner in the defense
of Western Europe, Prof. Harold
M. Dorr of the political science
department said, last night.
Addressing the twenty-first an-
nual Parent Education Institute,
Prof. Dorr asserted that "We
should adopt a stern attitude to-
wai'd Germany, making no further
concessions without demanding eq-
ual concessions to us."

Absentee Election Ballots
Still Available for 19 States

" * s

I

-Daly-Roger Seinke
LOVE POTION- Puck, played by John Waller, s prinkles dew guaranteed to produce undying love
for the first being who comes in sight of Titania, Diane Faulk, '51' as Oberon, Reid Shelton, Grad.
supervises and directs the operation,
* * *'
3onfire, Bands Midsummer Night's
iDream' To Open Tonight
P4r xth- l l R I = r

"IT MAY also be necessary to
be tough with France, even to the
extent of some kind of economic
sanctions, to secure her full par-
ticipation in European defense,"
he stated.
Prof. Dorr, who was in Germany
last summer and the previous year
studying the American democrati-
zation program, said that America
must recognize that Europe is the
area of world decision, and that
having accepted the policy of de-
fending Western Europe with the
aid of Germany, we cannot with-
draw.
Other speakers who addressed
opening day sessions of the Insti-
tute were Dean Ernest O. Melby
of New York University's School
of Education and Mrs. Henry A.
Overstreet, eminent author and
lecturer in the field of adult edu-
cation.
Mrs. Overstreet will be joined by
her husband at 1:45 p.m. today in
Rackham Lecture Hall to discuss
"The Home as the Best Place To.
Grow Up."

Absentee ballots still may be ob-
tained from 19 states including
Michigan in time to be returned
and counted in Tuesday's general
election.
In most of these 19 states vot-
Sale of Garg
Will Be Held
To morrow
The Gargoyle will bloom forth
from its basement office tomor-
row, when the' humor magazine
hits the campus for the first time
this semester.
A sell-out to beat all sell-outs is
expected, according to Editor Bob
Uchitelle, '51.
All the jokes of the issue will
run in a new column "Who Stole
My Dinosaur," by Bill Hulbert, '51,
who acts as master of ceremonies
as he leads the reader from joke
to joke.
Because the Russians last sum-
mer said that Michigan football
players kill each other, we are
doing a little feature on the sub-
ject," Uchitelle said. "We are also
commenting on what would hap-
pen if everything at Michigan
were carried on by television."
The cover of 'the magazine,.
drawn by Ron Stachowiak, '53,
will be black and liberty red, "with
a little emphasis on the word 'li-
berty,' " Uchitelle explained.'
"We are beginning sales tomor-
row instead of yesterday," he add-
ed, "because the printing ink took
48 hours to dry."
Vendors will sell Gargs on the
diag, at the Engineering Arch and
in front of Angell Hall and the
Business Administration Building.

ers have been automatically regis-
tered if they voted in general elec-
tions during the past two or four
years. In order to cast a ballot
these registered voters should re-
quest a ballot application from
their home county or city clerk
before the specified deadline for
applications is reached in each
state.
* *
SATURDAY is the deadline for
ballot applications in Michigan,
Colorado, Delaware, Indiana, Mis-
souri, Nevada, New Hampshire,
Oklahoma and Wisconsin.
Tomorrow is the last day to
obtain an application from Texas.
In North Carolina the deadline is
Sunday, while applications may
be obtained till Election Day in
Arizona, Iowa, Massachusetts,
Minnesota, Montana, Utah and
Wyoming.
When the ballot application
has been filled out and returned
to the clerk in the home dis-
trict the ballot will be sent to
the absentee voter. The marked
ballot has to be returned to the
home district no later than
Tuesday in order to be counted.
In Michigan a voter is automa-
tically registered if his permanent
residence is in a town having a
population of less than 20,000 and
if he voted in one of the last two
general elections. In the larger
cities a voter is automatically reg-
istered if he has voted once in the
last four general elections.
* * .
DETAILED information on the
procedure in each state can be
had as a service of the Young Re-
publican club by calling John Fo-
ley at 34295.
SL member Tom Walsh will no-
torize ballots free of charge from
3:30 to 5:30 p.m. today at the SL
Building, 122 S. Forest.

I

Masque-like scenes of fairydom
portrayed by a cast of nearly for-
ty will greet the opening night au-
dierice of Shakespeare's "A Mid-
summer Night's Dream," at 8 p.m.,
today at the Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
Shakespeare's comedy, which
was written during the yewrs 1595-
Election Will
Decide Many
Extra Issues
Local voters will have a chance
to decide several issues in the Nov.
7 election besides the selection of
county, state, and congressional of-
ficials.
Four proposals to amend the
state constitution and four to al-
ter the city charter will be voted
upon at that time also. The four
proposed constitutional changes
consist of: a redefinition of the
section of the constitution dealing
with subversive activities, authori-
zation of a $65,000,000 bond issue
for the construction of hospitals
for the mentally ill, changes in
the elective franchise (one of
which would extend the period of
residence required from 20 days
to 30), and authorization of manu-
facturers to color oleomargarine at
the place of production.
Here in Ann Arbor, charter
to be decided upon include a half
mill increase in property tax which
would be used to hire more fire-
men. This proposal follows com-
plaints of understaffing in the de-{
partment because of lack of funds.
Another proposed amendment
would shorten the fireman's work
week. The other two proposals to
be decided upon involve changes
in the city's pension provisions.

96, is believed to have for its
source Chaucer's "Knight's Tale"
and the well known folk lore of
western Europe.
* * 4.*
MUSIC FOR THE comedy was
written by Felix Mendelssohn. He
completed the overture when he
was only 17. The play was per-
formed with the'complete score in
London in 1843. It includes the
world famous "Wedding March."
Directed by Prof. Wayne Dun-
lap, of the music school, the
musical portion of the produc-
tion will be handled by the Lit-
tle Symphony Orchestra and a
selected women's chorus. The
entire production is under the
direction of Prof. Valentine
Windt, of the speech depart-
ment.
'Prominently cast are Diane
Faulk, as Titania, Reid Shelton as
Oberon, and John Waller as Puck.
THE COMICS will be played by
Nafe Katter, Arthur Nevins, Wil-
lard Booth, Conrad Stolzenbach,
Clarke Stevenson and William
Halstead.
Others in the cast are William
Bromfield, Nancy Stenbuck, Do-
lores Rashid, Dale Stevenson,
Richard Burgwin and Joyce Boh-
yer
An outstanding feature of this
production is that all of the
elves and pixies will be portray-
ed by Ann Arbor children. Some
of their roles are Peaseblossom,
Cobweb, Moth, Mustard Seed
and a Little Indian Boy.
According to a recent box office
announcement all' tickets for "A
Midsummer Night's Dream" have
been sold out, but all returned
tickets will be placed on sale one
hour before the curtain goes up-
on the three nights that the play
runs. They are priced at $1.20,
$.90 and $.60.

1

W
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PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S * PAY LESS AT MARSHALL'S *
Prices Effective Thursday,
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SENIORS and
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LAST CHANCE!
to make Ensian
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Deadline November 3
Act Now!

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