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October 28, 1950 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-28

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PAG.V .

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 28, 1950

J

---E srAT DAOTBR2,10

Hill Lecture
To BeGiven
By Laughton
British actor Charles Laughton
will present an evening of dra-
matic readings Wednesday in the
second of the current oratorical
series lectures.
Titled, "An vening with Charles
Laughton," his collection of read-
ings from the Bible to Shakespear-
ean farces will be heard at 8:30
p.m. in Hill Auditorium.
The famous actor has earned
his renown playing unsavory roles
like the Nazi saddist in "Arch of
Triumph," or the malevolent pub-
lisher in "The Big Clock."
For these roles he has beei call-
ed "a specialist in the deflation
of the ego" by critics.
He, himself, claims to be a spe-
cialist in modesty. "It's easy to
be modest when you look like I
do," he has said, surveying his 200
to 250 pounds of flesh. This weight
often makes him diet to fit a role.
When he portrayed Henry VIII,
he was. in his glory, as the role
required a 'heavy' lead who would
devour whole chickens during the
course of one meal.
Tickets for the Laughton lecture
are still available at the Hill Audi-
torium box-office which is open
daily from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. and
from 2 -to 5 p.m. However, they are
going fast according to a box-of-
fice announcement.

New Champion

'

and Earns

amWide

Renown

*

*

* r* *t
IFeatures Art

*
With

*

*

Precision

'S

-Daly-Malcolm Shatz
TROPHY WINNER-A house academic average of 2.71 during
1949-50, highest of all University men's dormitories,Won Victor
Vaughn House the Phi Eta Sigma trophy for outstanding aca-
demic achievement. Robert B. Olsen, left, Phi Eta Sigma president,
presents the trophy to house president Charles R. Volk, right.
Watching the presentation is Assistant Dean of the literary col-
lege James H. Robertson.
'U1' ShouldPay City, Tax Dobson Says

To the thousands of football fans
who gather each Saturday at the
Michigan Stadium the precision
marching, the snap formations
and the high quality musical
performances of the University
Marching Band appear to be al-
most effortless.
But when the blue and gold clad
bandsmen enter the field at a 200
steps-per-minute pace, their eight
minute show represents weeks of
pre-game preparation.
* * *
THE EVOLUTION of each half-
time band -show has a long history
of hard work behind it.
The first essential for any per-
formance is a basic theme. Many
of these theme ideas come from
the men in the band as well as
from Prof. William D. Revelli,
conductor, and Jack Lee, assist-
- ant conductor.
Song titles, musical shows and
current events all inspire theme
ideas. The cue for the show pre-
sented in New York for the Army

and Wisconsin games came from
the movie, "On the Town."
ONCE THE main idea is obtain-
ed, songs and formations are de-
vised for continuity. Many dra-
matic formations, however, are
discarded because of the impracti-
cality of performing them on a
football field.
The accepted formations are
plotted out and charted in line
with the gridiron yard markers.
Each member of the band is
assigned a number determined
by his rank and instrument. The
drums are always placed in the
center of a formation and the
basses face the band to provide
a constant beat.
Continuity sheets describing the
entire program and detailed plots
of each formation are given to
the bandsmen. A library staff of
seven students prepares the ma-
terial and also copies and photo-
stats the music to be played by
each instrument. Working on the

A city the size of Ann Arbor can
not sustain an institution of 20,-
000 students tax-free, John S.
Dobson, now negotiating with the
University on payments for city
services, declared yesterday.
Dobson also revealed that city
officials have decided on a defi-
nite figure with wlich to present

the Board of Regents in the near
future. However, the exact amount
of money which the city will re-
quest was not made known.
University officials c l a i m e d,
however, that the recent cut in
the budget renders the University
unable to afford any payments to
the city at this time.

PROF. REVELLI AND JACK LEE PLOT A FORMATION.

*

*

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library staff is the only way a
woman can participate in the
Marching Band.
* * *
GROUP rehearsals are held at
Ferry Field six times a week, at
4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday
and at 1 p.m. Saturday just before
the game. Buses pick up the bands-
nen at the Union and the Engi-
neering Arch to take them to and
from rehearsal.
The administrative end of the
band is carried out by Assistant
Dean of Students Walter Rea,
who is faculty business manager.
He travels to all away games,
makes food and sleeping accom-
modations and acts as a pur-
chasing agent.
Instruments for the 135-man
band fill an entire baggage car
when the band travels.
One complaint often made
against the Marching Band is that
it lacks feminine members. Not
even majorettes are connected with
the band. According to Prof. Re-
velli, the physical demands of the
band are too great for a woman.
He said that when the men come
off' the field, they are exhausted
and that the long hours of re-
hearsal require a great deal of
stamina.
* * *
THE BAND has a standard rule
of never stopping for anything
during a performance. If hats fall,
if instruments slip, if people are in
the way, the band keeps on march-
ing.
During one show a trumpet
player forgot to about face and
was left behind as the band
marched down the field. The
spectators never realized the slip
as the lone bandsman pretended
to be a scheduled soloist and
played to the end zone.
The results of intensive plan-
ning, rehearsing and training was
evident recently when the March-
ing Band took New York City by
storm.
* * *
SPORTS WRITERS in the ma-
jor metropolitan papers called the
band "one of the finest college mu-
sical organizations in the country,
and the best that has ever played
at Yankee Stadium." Praise was
added by West Point officials and
cadets who admired the snap pre-
cision and timing.
During the past few years the
Marching Band has experienced
a transition from a military or-
ganization to an entertainment
troupe. The half-time shows
have changed from squad drils
mixed with unrelated formations
to the present thematic musical
pageants. Military marches have
been replaced with hit tunes
such as "Bali Hai" and "Alex-
ander's Ragtime Band."
The former military emphasis
can be traced to the Army drill
masters who originally taught the
musicians their marching tech-
nique. Their training resulted.in a
militant air during the perform-
ance and established a tradition
that was long lived and is still
prevalent in many college bands.
Today, however, the prime ob-
jective of the University Marching
Band is to provide entertainment
through a combination of good
musicianship, good marching and
good showmanship.

ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M. Holy Communion
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by Stu-
dent Breakfast, Canter.bury House).
10:00 A.M.: High School and Junior High classes.
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the Rev.
Henry Lewis, S.T.D."
12:15 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship, Canterbury
House.
5:00 P.M.: Choral Evening Prayer.
5:45 P.M.: High School Club Supper and Pro-
gram, Page Hall.
5:45 P.M.: Canterbury Club Supper and Pro-
gram Planning Session, Canterbury House.
Wednesday, All Saints' Day, 7:00 and 10:15 A.M.
Holy Conmunion (Student Breakfast in Can-
terbury 'House following the early service.
Please note change in time of early service.)
Friday, 4:00 to 6:00 P.M.: Open House Tea,
Canterbury House.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
9:30 A.M.: Bible Study.
10:30 A.M.: Worship Service, with the pastor
preaching the Reformation Sunday sermon on,
"When God is a Mighty Fortress."
5:30 P.M.: Supper-Program of Gamma Delta,
Lutheran Student Club. Candlelighting Cere-
mony of Initiation for New Members.
Tuesday at 9:00: Reformation Day Vesper Service,
with the sermon by the Rev. F. A. Hertwig of
Detroit, Second Vice-President of The Lutheran
Church-Missouri Synod.
Wednesday at 7:00: Chapel Choir Rehearsal.
Thursday at 7:30: Meeting of Student Assembly
of the University Lutheran Chapel.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
(Disciples of Christ)
Hill at Tappan Street
Rev. Joseph M: Smith. Minister
HowardsFarrar, Choir Director
Frances Farrar, Organist
9:30 A.M.: Church School-College Age Class.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship.
(Nursery for Children)
Sermon: "A Faith For the Free."
GUILD HOUSE, 438 Maynard Street
H. L. Pickerill, Director
'Jean Garee Bradley, Associate
STUDENT GUILD: 6:00 supper at the Congrega-
tional Church. The Leiden Quartette, of The
Netherlands, on, a good will tour of this coun-
try, will present a program of music and dis-
cussion.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State & Williams
Minister: Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Student Ministry: Rev. H. L. Pickerill;
Mrs. George Bradlev
Director of Music: Wayne Dunlap
Organist: Howard R. Chase
9:30 A.M.: Intermediate Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Primary and Beginners Church School.
10:45 A M.: Public Worship. Dr Parr's subject is:
"Where Do You Stand?"
6:00 P.M.: Student Supper. Program by the
Leiden Quartette from the Netherlands.

FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Adult Group-Dr. A. F. Milford, "The
Doctor's Case Against National Health Insur-
ance."
11:00 A.M.: Services-Rev. Edward H. Redman,
"Unitarianism Today."
7:30 P.M.: Student Group--Dr. B. K. Bagchi,
"Principles of Hinduism."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.: Sunday Morning Services.
Oct. 29-Everlasting Punishment.
9 130 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.:
This room is open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 11 A.M. to 5 P.M. Please notice
the time has been changed from 11:30 to 11
o'clock.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Henry Van
Til, Calvin College, Grand Rapids, Michigan.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Van Til.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdohl,
Joe A. Porter, Ministers
10:45 A.M.: Worship, "Religion-A Pillar of
Society" Dr. Robert Andrews Millikan, preach-
ing.
5:30 P.M.: Student Supper and.Social Hour.
6:30 P.M.: Vespers, "Religion-A Pillar of
Civilization" Dr. Robert A. Millikan, speaker.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms - Open
Daily.
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Theodore R. Schmale, D.D.'
Walter S. Press, Pastors
9:30 A.M.: Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Sermon by Rev.
Press, "The Power of God's Living Word."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild at the tCongregational
Church. An evening of music and discussion
will be presented by five students from The
Netherlands who are on a good will tour of
this country.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 E. Huron
C. H. Loucks, Minister
Mrs. Crystal Cuthbert, Assistant
10:00 A.M.: Bible Study at Guild House-Il Cor-
inthians.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Worship "Our Contempor-
ary Protest."
6:00 P.M.: Supper and Discussion at Guild
House, The Rev. C. H. Loucks, speaker, "My
Church."

IN THE NEW "M" FORMATION AT FERRY FIELD. DRUM MAJOR DICK SMITH BARKS COMMANDS.

A
DAILY
PHOTO
FEATURE
* .*
Story by
Leonard Greenbaum.
Pictures by.
Burt Sapowitch

THE MARCHING BAND COMES DOWN THE FIELD DURING A REHEARSAL.

*\ * * * * * *!

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
1304 Hill Street
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor

f

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