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October 28, 1950 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, eOCTOBEfR , 11S0

8 ___________________

TAMBOURINE RETIRED:

Salvation Army Adopts Plastic Boxes

! 4

By CRAWFORD YOUNG
No longer will patrons of local
foam palaces, interrupted in their
drinking by a familiar jingle, see
a tambourine being passed around
through the dense fog of tobacco
smoke and malt vapor.
For a landmark has passed from
the American scene. The Salvation
Army has abandoned its tradition-
al tambourine as a collecting plate
in favor of a streamlined, modern,
plastic box.
* '4 *
THE TAMBOURINE has had a
long, happy, and prosperous as-
sociation with The Salvation Ar-
my. Its first use dates ba k to
1880, when members of th tim-
brel bands passed them arohnd in
some of the drabber sections 'of
merry England.
The tambourine then emigra-
ted to this country, ,where it
took root and flourished. Back
in the Mother country, it was
soon abandoned by the Salva-
tion Army, but in America, it
grew to be a universally recog-
nized symbol of the organiza-
tion.
Lately, however, the tambourine
has been having its troubles here.
Some of our shrewder citizens had
discovered how easy it wasto don
garments resembling the uniform
of the Salvation Army and stand
on a street corner, tambourine in
hand. This was much simpler than
working for a living.
THIS PRACTICE grew to be
such a flourishing business that
the. Salvation Army set to work
modeling a new, unique, and hum-
bug-proof collection box. The fruit
of their labors is just beginning to
come into general use.
The new - fangled collection
box is closed with a lock on it
and a slot for the money, is
bright-red, and has "Salvation
Army" engraved on the front in
bold script.
Mrs. Oscar W. Agre, long-time
collector for the Salvation Army,
felt that the new boxes were at-
tractive, easily recognizable, and
serviceable.
But still, the tambourine is a
symbol that has long been with
us. Its departure from the Ameri-
can scene will bring a sentimental
tear to the eye of those who have
been long accustomed to its mer-
ry jingle.
Union Calendar To
Be ReadyMonday
The Union calendar will be dis-
tributed from 3 to 5 p.m. Monday
in the main lounge of the Union.
The calendar, an annual service
project of the Union publicity com-
mittee, covers the months from
October through February, listing
all the major campus, functions
which are as yet planned.
Featuring a picture story of Un-
ion activities, the calendar is note-
book size, and is punched for easy
filing.
TONIGHT!
AT MIDNIGHT
HALLOWEEN SHOW
All Seats 60c
2 HORROR
FEATURES!

- Last Times Today -
......... .........--.
withPAUL HENREID:
- Coming Sunday --
LOVE AND LAWLESS LIVING
SGO HAND IN HAND!

i " * i #

-Daily-Malcolm Shatz
END OF AN ERA-Mrs. Oscar W. Agre, longtime worker with
the local Salvation Army organization, compares the bright new
collection box with the old tambourine, which is being replaced.
The tambourine has long been the symbol of the Salvation Army
to millions, rich and poor alike.
Subversive A mendment
.draws Slo.sson's Wrath-

Adoption of the proposed
amendment to the state constitu-
tion outlawing "subversion" would
be a dangerous precedent, Prof.
Preston W. Slosson of the history
department asserted yesterday.
Health Panel
To End Today
The Discussional on Industrial
Health programs sponsored by the
Medical School and the School
of Public Health swings into its
second and final day today with
two panel discussions.
At 9 a.m. Dr. Max R. Burnell,
industrial health director of one
of the nation's largest industries
and General Otis B. Schreuder of
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base
will lead a discussion on civil air
defense, effects of atomic wea-
pons, atomic medicine and radio-
logical defense.
At 11 a.m. Dean Albert Fursten-
burg of the Medical School. and
Dr. C. D. Selby of the School of
Public Health will lead a panel
discussion on the present status
of graduate education in occupa-
tional medicine.
Play Ends Today
The last performance of the
Student Players production "Light
Up The Sky" will be given at 8
p.m. today at the Lydia Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
Tickets will be on sale from 2
to 5 p.m. at the theatre box office
and directly before the show be-
gins.

The amendment describes sub-
version as "any act or advocacy of
any act, intended to overthrow the
form of government of this state
. . . . by force or violence or by
any unlawful means."
PROF. SLOSSON, a member of
an impromptu citizen's commit-
tee campaigning for the defeat of
the amendment, pointed out that
any act aimed at overthrowing
the government was already pro-
hibited by numerous laws. The
amendment is entirely unneces-
sary in this respect, he said.
"The only effects the law
would have would be further
persecution of members of the
Communist party or those who
speak in a fiery manner from
soapboxes," Prof. Slosson said.
"We are all opposed to conspir-
acy, espionage, and acts of vio-
lence against our country or state.
But this law is open to judicial in-
terpretation which would amount
to the banning of free expression
of opinion," Prof. Slosson empha-
sized.
"The fast thing we want to do
is to follow Russia's example of
thought control," the historian
declared.
* * *
"THE REALLY dangerous Com-
munists are those who operate un-
derground. T h e s e undoubtedly
profess to be strongly anti-com-
munist. And the dangerous ones
will not be touched by the pro-
posed amendment," Prof. Slosson
asserted.
Instead, only a few "rattle-
brained crack-pots" would be
caught by such a law. This type of
person is hardly dangerous, Prof.
Slosson continued.
School Science
Confab To Open

WSSF Will
Hold Area
Conference
Student representatives from 25
colleges and universities in Michi-
gan and upper Ohio will attend
the World Student Service Fund
Area Conference today at the Uni-
versity.
Meeting from 9 a.m. to 5:30
p.m. at the Michigan League, the
students will attempt to map out
WSSF's future in the region with
the aid of experts experienced in
WSSF projects abroad.
* * *
WILMER J. KITCHEN, Execu-
tive Secretary of WSSF, just re-
turned from a tour of student sup-
ported projects in Europe and Asia
will address the conference.
The conference will also hear a
report on the region by Frank G.
Sulewski, new Regional Seretary
of WSSF for the Central Region.
Through two years' work as an
UNRRA official in Europe he is
thoroughly acquainted with con-
ditions abroad.
Lane Hal staff assistant Bush
Olmsted, formerly with World
Student Relief in Germany, will
explain displaced persons and
refugee aid programs.
In the afternoon general ses-
sion students will pool ideas on
how to carry out the WSSF pro-
gram on their various campuses
and will explain the successful as-
pects of their work.
Service Group
Will Convene
Here Today
Six chapters of Alpha Phi Ome-
ga willconvene here today for the
annual state conclave of the ser-
vice fraternity, according to Ad-
rian Oudbier, '51,,publicity chair-
man.
The University chapter will be
host to members from Michigan
State College, the University of
Detroit, Central Michigan College,
Wayne University, Western Michi-
gan College of Education and
Michigan College of Mining and
Technology, Oudbier said.
The conclave will begin at noon
today with a general meeting, fol-
lowed by discussion groups, Oud-
bier added. T. Luther Purdom, di-
rector of the Bureau of Appoint-
ments, will address the delegates
at a banquet tonight in the Union.
A second general meeting will
be held tomorrow morning. Guests
of honor at the conclave will be
Thomas Waber, of the fraternity's
national board, and Prof. H. C.
Barnett, of the architecture col-
lege, national second vice-presi-
dent, Oudbier said.
Dental Teachers
To JoinMeeting
Four faculty members of the
School of Dentistry will appear on
the scientific program of the 91st
annual session of the American
Dental Association to be held Mon-
day through Thursday in Atlantic
City.
The men from the dental school
who will be delivering addresses
are Dr. Richard H. Kingery, Dr.
Donald A. Kerr, Dr. Oliver C. Ap-
plegate and Dr. Roland O. Nissle.

MICHIGAN DAILY
Phone 23-24-1
HOURS: 1 to 5 P.M.
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .54 1.21 1.76
3 .63 1.60 2.65
4 .81 2.02 3.53
Figure 5 average words to a line.
Classified deadline daily except
Saturday is 3 P.M. Saturdays,
11:30 A.M. for Sunday Issue.

BUSINESS SERVICES
ALTERATIONS and Tailoring of all
kinds. Work guaranteed. Phone 2-1919.
821 Packard. )23B
STUDENT RATES on FORTUNE-$7.50
a year instead of $12.50. Student Per-
iodical Agency, Phone 2-82-42. )2.
TYPING manuscript, theses. etc. Call
Lois Spaide, 2-0795 or 2-7460. )24P
VIOLA STEIN-Experienced typist. 308
S. State. Legal. MasterdDoctors dis-
sertations, etc. 2-9848 or 2-4228. )12B
WASHING-Finished work and ironing.
Also rough dry and wet washing. Free
pick-up and delivery. Ph. 2-9020. )1B1
TYPEWRITERS AND FOUNTAIN PENS
Sales, Rentals, and Service
Morrill's - 314 S. State St. }4B
AL CHASE and his ORCHESTRA
Ann Arbor's Finest Dance Music!
Phone 3YP-4427 )21B
GOOD RENTAL TYPEWRITERS now
available at Office Equipment Ser-
vice Company. 215 E. Liberty..
Guaranteed repair service on all
makes of typewriters. )6B
Read and Use
The Daily Classifieds

HELP WANTED
STUDENT WANTED to wait table for.
meals. 1319 Hill St. Ph. 2-6422. )38H.
TALENT WANTED - AMATEURS,'
PROFESSIONALS, HOME TALENT
Be included in our new .Fall Catalog
and Index? Opportunities throughout
southeastern Michigan. Send a post
card for details on a good deal for you.
CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS
Send for our catalog. Fine talent for
every occasion. JASI, 321 W. Cortland,
Jackson. )39H

PROFESSIONAL BLOOD DONORS-The
University Hospital Blood Bank will
accept new applications from males
over 21 years of age who wish to be-
come professional blood donors. Apply
at the blood bank between 8:30-11:30
a.m., Monday through Friday. Other
hours by appointment.
STUDENTS! Do you have any sales ex-
perience. We can show you good earn-
ings for part time work; also an op-
portunity to follow a successful sales
organization that offers an excesllent
future to those who qualify. Write
Box No. 302. The Michigan Daily. )30H
MAKE YOURSELF PROSPEROUS in-
stead of broke. Sell the student rates
on TIME & LIFE on evenings. Phone
Don Anderson, 2-82-42 for details. )2
FOR SALE
1930 FORD SEDAN-Good condition. Call
Tom Walsh, 2-7816. )78
HALF PRICE-Kroll carriage, aluminum
bassenette, playpen. Good condition.
Ph. 2-7376. )79
ZEISS IKON 1950 Contax IIA, F2 lens,
never used. Call Gault, Lawyer's Club,
3-4145. )77
ONE CHECKERED COAT
It's too loud for my
graduate picture and
my girl won't walk with
me when I wear it on campus.
Don't let this happen to you.
Invest your money in a grad or
Senior picture before the Nov. 3
deadline. ENSIAN.<

FOR SALE
SOLVE YOUR transportation problems.
1935 Chev., new cyl. head, clutch, gen.
Ph. 2-2035, 6:30-12:00 p.m. )76
READ TIME this year at the special
reduced Student Rate. Still only
$4.75 a year (instead of $6.00), Regular
newsdealers do not carry this rate-
it must be accepted by specially-
authorized college agencies. Your
representative is Student Periodical
Agency, Don Anderson, Grad, man-
ager. Address 705 First National Bldg.
To order you need only phone 2-82-42.
)2
A-2 FLIGHT JACKET-Genuine horse-
hide front quarter $19.95. Knit cuffs,
zipper front, leather epaulets. Open
till 6 p.m. Sam's Store, 122 E. Wash-
ington. )5
BABY PARAKEETS which can be train-
ed to talk and whistle-$6 each.vBird
supplies and cages. 562 S. Seventh,
Phone 5330. 12B
POST WAR Philo amplifier and P.A.
system. Automatic record changer.
Ideal for parties, like new. Very rea-
sonable. Ph. 7356. )73
-- COUSINS -
on State Street
Genuine Levis $3.95. Sanforized
22 inch waist line and up }3
ROOMS FOR RENT
ISINGLE ROOM now available, close to
campus and Union. Shower, continu-
ous hot water, reasonable, 509 S. Di-
vision St., near Jefferson St. )45R
ATTRACTIVE furnished double room.
Kitchen privileges. 1106 Lincoln. Ph.
5224. ) 44R
2 ROOM SUITE for 3 men. 1218 Olivia.
Call8746 after 5:30. 134R
TOURIST HOME for Overnight Guests.
Bath, shower, reasonable rates. 518 E.
Williams St. Phone 3-8454. 112R
ROOMS available for students' guests
football week-ends. Private home ac-
commodations. Phone 2-9850, 11:00-
1:00 or 6:30-9:30 p.m. )14R
3RD FLOOR STUDIO NEAR CAMPUS--
Prefer two to four art or arch.
men students. Linens, use of dark
room. Student landlord. Ph. 2-8545,
6-7. )23R
PERSONAL
STUDENT desires part-time afternoon
,lob. 1:30-5 P.M. Call Cliff 2-5644. )28P
STUDENTS MAY subscribe to LIFE at
the special Student Rate of $5.00 a
year (Regularly $6.75). Through Stu-
dent Periodical Agency, phone 2-82-42.
EXPERIENCED PIANO TEACHER -
Don-David Lustenan, 100 Adams Hse.
2-4401. )27P
LEARN TO DANCE with great dispatch.
RAY HATCH DANCE STUDIOS
209 S. State, Ph. 5083 )4P

LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Hamilton watch, leather wrist
band. Yellow gold. Reward. Phone
3-4685, 1320 Forest Ct. )52L
LOST - Fountain pen. Ladies green
Shaeffer lifetime pen. Call Ypsi 8189
or 1800W. Reward. )53L
LOST-8 mil. movie camera, at Wiscon-
sin game. $10 reward. Call 3972 W
Ypsilanti. )50L
LOST-Brown rimmed glasses in brown
case - on Island. Reward. 2-5553,
Rm. 423. )51L
FOR RENT
SUITE for 2 couples and 1 db. rm. for
football weekends. Call 3-8126. )22F
MAN to share 3 rm. apt. Icebox, phone,
shower, cooking. $7 wk. Call Hugh
2-2955 after 7:30. )21F
TRANSPORTATION
WANTED-Ride to, Charleston, South
Carolina or vicinity, Xmas vacation.
Call 370 Jordan Hall. )21T

CLUB 211
Three meals per day for $1.50
.J. D. Miller's Cafeteria.

PERSONAL
KIDDIE KARE
Reliable sitters available. Ph. 3-1121.
LEARN TO DANCE
Jimmie Hunt Dance Studio
122 E. Liberty Phone 8161 )1P

-1

by
Th ri

Dinner Dates

i

Ph. 565T

Cinema Triumphs
From All Nations

,Au~wrs* NION.omas
"I overslept ... and couldn't wait
to get dressed to get down here to
Allenel."
ALLENEL HOTEL

FER ANDEL F AR LETTY Michel SIMON
CONTINUOUS d in/iell
Ends Sunday

MICHIGAN DAILY CLASSIFIEDS

12P

.......-.-

Student Legislature Cinema Guild

Student Legislature Cinema Guild
Presents
"DEAD- OF NIGHT"r
a psychological thriller
Michael Redgrave -' "Googie" Withers - Mervyn Johns
Friday & Saturday, Oct. 27-28
7:30 and 9:30
*AN UNUSUAL BRITISH MADE THRIL-
LER-well off the beaten Hollywood path."
--Time. "Feverishly convincing . . . fine
stuff"-New Yorker. "Made with exceptional
skill and wit--one of the most successful
blends of laughter, terror, and outrage that I
can remember"-John Agee, The Nation.
BECAUSE OF THE REACTION to this film
when it was shown, last semester, to the limited
membership of the Gothic Film Society, we
have brought it back for a campus-wide
audience. It is a chilling motion picture in
the tradition of "Night Must Fall."
-S. L. Cinema Guild

I

,

AN INTIMATE CLOSE-UPTOA
TOA- OF HOLLYI-WOOD'S MOST .
BEAUTIFUL GIRLS-
They're gorgeous
in color by7 /ff(oe
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