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October 19, 1950 - Image 5

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-19

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THURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE FIVE

I.' I F , I I

SHINE ON HARVEST MOON:
Third "Homecoming Harvest"
Will Be Given by East Quad

Corn husks will hop and pump-
kins will prance at the third an-
nual: East Quad homecoming
dance,. "Homecoming Harvest," to
be presented from 9 p.m. to mid-
night Saturday in the south side
dining rooms of the Quadrangle.
Open to residents of the Quad
and their guests, the dance will
feature the music of two bands.
Hank Durham and the Avon Club
band from Toledo will share the
musical spotlight with Joe Foder
and his orchestra of Ann Arbor.
BASED on a harvest theme, this
year's event will find couples danc-
ing amidst an atmosphere of corn
husks,. pumpkins and cardboard
:moons.
Intermission e n t e r t a i n -
ment will be provided by resi-
dents of the Quad. "Zany" Fred-
dy Yaffe will act as master of
ceremonies and will introduce
the skits which are being plan-
ned.
Charles R. Reynolds, better
known in the Quad as "Reynaldo,
The Great," will demonstrate his
Skill as a magician, and Joe Se-
bastian will entertain the dancers
with his impersonations of popu-
lar singers. *
REFRESHMENTS consisting of
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cider and cookies will be served in
the south lounge of the quadran-
gle.
General chairman of the
dance is William Marcou. As-
sisting him are Sharon Miller,
publicity; James Watson, tic-
kets; John Goodyear, decora-
tions and James Peck, refresh-
ments.
Tickets for the dance are $1.25
per couple.
Union DanCe
FollowsRally
School spirit and informality
will keynote the Union dance
which will be held after the pep
rally tomorrow.
In keeping with the atmosphere
of the dance, informal attire, such
as sweaters and skirts and jeans,
will be in ordei.
Entertainment will be provided
by Jay Mills, who will act as
master of ceremonies, and Vir-
ginia Robinson, who will give a
monologue.
Frank Tinker's orchestra will
furnish music for the dance,
which will last until midnight.

Doctor Warns
Against Vanity
In Footwear
"Put your best foot forward" is
the slogan on the lips of modern
chiropodists, but women wonder
from their description of the
"right" kind of shoes how their
"best foot" is going to look.
It seems to be the old feminine
battle of vanity versus foot
health, and according to Dr. Ken-
neth Sjoquist, . Chicago chiropo-
dist, vanity has prevailed too long.
Dr. Sjoquist believes that a
compromise is possible. "In gen-
ecal," he says, "a shoe should be
soft and pliable; the heel should
be low and broad; the shoe should
be fitted snugly at the heel and
instep."
Dr. Sjoquist points out that 75
per cent of all persons in the
United States have some foot ail-
ment.
He states, "If the shoe fits,
wear it. If it doesn't, then discard
it quickly because it can cause
severe damage to your feet."
"It will prove far cheaper in
the end to buy a new pair of shoes
that fit properly than to spend
months undergoing care for foot
disorders," the doctor continued.
Three important rules for foot
care are stressed. "Wear correct
shoes that are properly fitted.
Give your feet plenty of rest. Have
your feet examined regularly."

Fall Atmosphere To Prevail
During Homecoming Dance
Trophies To Be Awarded at Intermission;
Origin of Display Tradition Lost in Past

Bright reds, yellows and oranges
-the colors of the crisp fall leaves
-cornstalks, pumpkins and a big,
golden harvest moon will uly
make the Homecoming Dance an
"Autumn Maize."
Decorations are being planned
along this theme to impart an
atmosphere of the Indian Sum-
mer days which are prevailing in
Ann Arbor.
CLAUDE THORNHILL and his
orchestra will also help to set the
mood for the dance, for they will
play from a bandstand covered
with decorations of brilliant aut-
umnal hues.
As refreshment, and also in
keeping with the theme of the
event, cider will be served to the
dancers.
Homecoming cups which are
awarded to the three men's and
three women's residences on cam-
pus who in the opinon of the
judges have the best displays will
be presented during intermission.
THE ORIGIN of the traditional
homecoming displays at Michigan
is so ancient that no one knows
exactly when it was begun. There
is no evidence of any house deco-
rations back in 1897 when the first
Homecomng game was played be-
tween the alumni and the Varsity
Just before the first World
War, however, there is a record
of a contest for displays which
was limited just to campus fra-
ternities.
This practice was discontinued
during and immediately after
World War I, but in the early
twenties displays were again seen
on fraternity lawns.
* * .
TROPHIES were awarded in
1932 for the first time when silver
cups were donated by local mer-

chants. Theta Xi coped the prize
that year with a display that fea-
tured a grandstand .of Michigan
fans cheering as Minnesota Gop-
hers were trampled into the
ground.
Women had no part in the
contest until 1937 when IFC
challenged sororities to com-
pete with them. Kappa Alpha
Theta won the prize for the so-
rorities wth a display showing
a man with a football for a head
dancing on the lawn.
In 1942 the contest was again
abandoned due to war, but it was
revived again in 1944.
Grads To Hold Mixer
In. Rackham Tomorrow
A mixer will be held for gradu-
ate students at 8:30 p.m. Friday
in the Rackham Assembly Hall.
This is the third such event to
be held this year.
For bridge enthusiasts and ca-
nasta fans, cards will be available.
As a special attraction, a four-
piece band will be on deck for
dancing.
Refreshments will be served.

AUTUMN MAIZE-Members of the Homecoming Dance committee pool their efforts to set a
ticket booth on the diagonal. They are busy filling helium balloons which will be attached to the
top and sides of the booth. Tickets for the dance may be purchased at this booth, in the Admin-
istration Building or from any member of Student Legislature.
THE BELLS ARE RINGING:
ihigan Women Wed During Summer

I-

!--- 9

I

Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN PRICES

AT THE UNION
nab -come as you are
Music by
RANK TINKER
riday $1.50 tax inel.

Palmer-Hollis
Wedding bells rang June 10,
when Miss Beverly Scott Palmer,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Robert
L. Palmer of Detroit, and Chief
Petty Officer Hollis V. Wilson,
USNR, son of Mr. and Mrs. Sim
Wilson of Champaign, Ill., ex-
changed their marriage vows in
Ann Arbor.
The former Miss Palmer, a
teaching assistant in the fine arts
department, is a graduate of the
University. She is working for a
master's degree in fine arts and
is affiliated with Zeta Tau Alpha.
Mr. Wilson, an administrative
assistant at the Naval Air Station
in Grosse Ile, attended the Un-
versity of Illinois.
Grant-Gun dersen
Miss Avery Grant, daughter of
Prof. and Mrs. Frederick H. Test
of Ann Arbor, and Dr. Sigurd B.
Gundersen, Jr., son of Dr. and Mrs.
Sigurd B. Gundersen of La Crosse,
Wisconsin, exchanged their mar-
riage vows June 3 in Ann Arbor.
Mrs. Gundersen, a graduate of
the University, is affiliated with

Pi Beta Phi. Her husband graduat-
ed from Harvard Medical School.
Both are on the staff' of Massa-
chusetts General Hospital, Boston.
Mayhew-McBride
Miss Harriett Lucille Mayhew,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David
L. Mayhew of Charlotte, became
the bride of John Thomas Mc-
Bride, son of Mrs. B. A. McBride
of Amsterdam, N. Y., and E. J.
McBride of Athens, 0., June 17 in
A*n Arbor.
Mrs. McBride is a senior at the
University. Her husband graduated
from the University in June.
* * *
Kays-Kraushaar
Miss Doris Kays, daughter of
Mr and Mrs. J. W. Kays of Ann
Arbor, and Donald Kraushaar, son
of Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Kraushaar
of Bay City, were married June
17 in Ann Arbor.
The former Miss Kays !s a 1949
graduate of the University music
school. Her husband graduated
from the University engineering
college.
* a
Mills-McCabe'
Miss Mary Lou Mills, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry D. Mills of
Ann Arbor, spoke her marriage
vows to Robert Vance McCabe of
Detroit, son of Dr. and Mrs. Al-
fred McCabe of Coraopolis, Pa.,
June 17 in the Michigan League
Chapel
A member of Alpha Chi Omega
sorority. Mrs. McCabe is a gradu-
ate of the University. She is em-
ployed with the J. L. Hudson Co.
in Detroit.

Podewils-Anderson
Miss Doris Ruth Podewils,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George
Podewils of Ann Arbor, and Don-
ald Robert Anderson, son of Mr.
and Mrs. W. Roy Anderson of
Montreal, were married June 8.
The new Mrs. Anderson, a mem-
ber of Mu Phi Epsilon music so-
rority, is a senior in the Univer-
sity's music school.
Her husband is a graduate stu-
dent in the music school.

Cocci

Ca LJar

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Student-Faculty Tea Committee
-Interviewing for positions on the
Studenit-Faculty Tea Committee is
slated from 3 to 6 p.m. tomorrow
in the League.
All eligible independent women
may sign up for interviews in the
Undergraduate Office of the
League. Positions open include:
general co-chairmen, hostess co-
chairmen ' and publicity co-chair-
men.
* * *
Soph Cab-There will be a pub-
licity committee meeting at 5:10
today in the League for all women
who signed up to do stunts.
* * *
Candy Booths-Chairmen of all
dormitory candy booths are re-
quested to bring their invoices and
deposits to Pat Patsloff, from 3:15
to 5 b.m. today in the League
Undergraduate Office.
* * *
Lacrosse Club-Members are to
come prepared to play at 4:30 p.m.
Friday at the WAB. Instructions
for beginners will be given.

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANIZATION
ot the UNIVERSITY of MICHIGAN
invites you to attend a- Free Lecture entitled
"CHRISTIAN SCIENCE: THE SCIENCE OF EXISTENCE"
by DR; HENDRIK J. deLANGE, C.S.B., of New York City
Member of the Board of Lectureship of the Mother
Church, The First Church of Christ; Scientist, in
Boston, Massachusetts
RACKHAM LECTURE HALL

.4
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MONDAY, OCTOBER 23, 1950

8:00 P.M.

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Brown Leather
Black Suede

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"SCENE" on the smartest little feet in town.
The shoe that acts like on angel whether you're mountain climbing
or hopping with the juke-box crowd. A Penobscot Trampeze
that wins applause for its smooth lines, its wupple polished-leather
uppers, its sturdy soles. And it's made for a huge

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NO MATTER HOW YOU WRIGGLE, twist and turn, this bra
expands and contracts with every slightest motion. Gently
moulds, uplifts and supports like a living, breathing part of
you. The secret's In the clever "cross stretch"-resilient Lastex
weave, applied up and down in bust section, around the body
in back, with upper cups in fine Nylon mesh. 32-38 A-B.

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audience cause it's balcony priced at apiffle of o

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