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October 14, 1950 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-14

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tE FOrit

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, -OCTOBER 14, 1950
.

FOtI SATURDAY, OC1~OBER 14, 1950
I U I

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FOOTBALL FROLIC:
Ann Arbor Set for Zany
Homecoming Weekend

By BOO KEITH
Another zany and traditionally
spectacular Homecoming celebra-
tion will be on tap here next week-
end when the Wolverines do battle
with the Wisconsin Badgers.
All sorts of activities have been
planned to provide students and
visiting alumni with a rousing
time from Friday night to the wee
hours Sunday morning.
The week-end bill will include
a big pre-game pep rally Friday
and the traditional Homecoming
Dance Saturday night. Adding
considerable color to the festivities
will be scores of displays set up by
housing groups throughout cam-
pus.
* * *
INITIAL preparations for the
affair are already underway, with
at least 66 dorms, fraternities, so-
rorities and co-ops concocting wit-
ty and wierd outdoor decorations.
Spirited students are going all
out to do a bang-up job. At least
one house has obtained raw ma-
terials by raiding lumber piles
at the new South Quad. Most
groups will enliven their dis-
plays with moving parts and in
a few cases smoke or running
water.
Judging will take place Saturday
morning and cups will go to win-
ning houses.
THIS YEAR'S Homecoming is
apparently the 53rd such occas-
sion in University history. The
event was inaugurated in 1897
when alumni foot-ballers came
home to play against the Varsity.
Display contests are more re-
cent. Fraternities started them be-
fore the first world war and in-
dependent houses' and dorms took
part for the first time in 1944.

That year is still a nightmare
to the feminine carpenters at
one particular sorority. The wo-
men built their display in the
basement and then found it was
too large to move outdoors.
Troubles of a different nature
upset the 1947 Homecoming. That
was the year Life magazine did
a spread on the fete. Everyone
here was excited over- the pros-
pects, but local pride quickly dis-
appeared when the magazine came
out showing a grinning coed witht
a cabbage on her head and a cou-
ple of thoroughly soused Wolver-
ine fans.
Welfare State
o Be Debated
At Assembly
"The Welfare State" will be the
topic of the symposium highlight-
ing the fourth annual high school
debate assembly which will meet
today in Lydia Mendelssohn The-
atre under the sponsorship of the
speech department.
The assembly, expected to draw
about 500 high-school students,
will begin at 9:30 a.m. with regis-
tration, followed at 10 a.m. by a
welcoming address by Haydenk
Carruth, manager of the Michigan
Forensic Association.
* * *
THE SYMPOSIUM on the wel-
fare state will begin at 10:15 a.m.
and will be followed by a question
period. Discussing the welfare state
will be Prof. Werner Landecker, of
the sociology department; Harold
Levinson, of the economics depart-
ment and Prof. Morgan Thomas, of
the political science department.
Ed Miller, director of forensics,
will discuss the problems of debat-
ing the welfare state question at
11:45 a.m.
A demonstration debate on the
welfare state will begin at 1:30
p.m. The debaters will be Lloyd
Kaiser and Sherwin Wine, affirm-
ative; Tom Murray and Marvin
Esch, negative.
The debate will be criticized by
Prof. William Sattler, of the speech
department.

'U' Band To
Perform in
New York
Traveling from the mud of Ferry
Field to the gridiron of Yankee
Stadium the University Marching
Band will exhibit its famed music-
al technique and precision march-
ing before the 67,000 football fans
gathered for the Michigan-Army
game today.
The band, which had practiced
for the show despite the rain early
this week, left Ann Arbor Thurs-
day morning on a special train.
* * C
THE BAND played at an alumni
pep rally last night. One forma-
tion practice session was held in
a Bronx park yesterday with the
final practice set for 11 a.m. to-
day.
Dressed in their blue and gold
uniforms the band will march
from the rehearsal to Yankee
Stadium, where they will put on
a pre-game performance.
The big show, however, will be
during half times Taking to the
field from the Yankee bull pen,
the band will salute today's foot-
ball opponents with a block "M"
and "ARMY."
THE BANDSMEN, 135 strong,
will then depict a visitor's impres-
sion of the nation's biggest city
in a special show prepared by
Prof. William ReVelli, conductor
of University bands, and assistant-
conductor Jack Lee.
The first formation, a horse
and buggy, will portray a figura-
tive stroll through Central Park.
Then to the tune of "How Dry
I Am" they will move into the
shape of 'an old fashioned water
pump symbolizing the recent water
shortage in New York.
PRECISION-MARCHING w i l1
take the next spotlight as the
band, in block formation, salutes
the Rockettes.
Moving out of the block the
bandsmen will form two para-
chutes symbolizing the amuse-
ments at Coney Island.
The final formation will be a
diagonal USA with the Statue of
Liberty in,the center.
Accounting Parley
The 25th annual Michigan Ac-
counting Conference, sponsored by
the business administration school,
will open tomorrow in Rackham
Lecture Hall.
OPTICAL SERVICE
CAMPUS OPTICIANS
222 Nickels Arcade
Phone 2-9116

bomber Aid
To Veterans
Completed
The last 24 Bomber Scholar-
ships, amounting to $100 each,
have been awarded, according to
Dean Erich A. Walter.
This year's award brings to a
total of 254 the number of scholar-
ships granted from the bomber
fund. It was started in 1942 to
provide financial assistance for
veterans who attended the Univer-
sity at the end of the war.
THE PLAN provided that a part
of the receipts from campus social
functions would be donated to a
fund which would be invested in
United States War Bonds.
The original goal of the plan
was to purchase enough bonds to
buy an Army bomber; thus the
name "Bomber Scholarships"
was suggested.
A total of $25,400 has been
awarded from the original $22,500
investment coupled with the in-
terest.
RECIPIENTS of the award, who
are all veterans, are:
John D. Boenke, '51; Paul B.
Brace, '51A; Robert O. Burns, '51
BAd; Theodore Chapekis, '52 E;
Lawrence M. DeVore, '52; Robert
F. Dyche, '51; Myrl C. Gilchrist,
Jr., '51E; William W. Gordinier,
Jr., '51; Stuart A. Hoenig, '51; Wil-
liam H. Janton, '51SM; Fred W.
LaBastille, '51NR; Leonard A. Nie-
mi, '51E; Milton L. Patrik, '51E;
Edwin J. Piersma, '51E; Alfred B.
Reimer, '51; James B. Richter, '52;
Philip Saffer, '51; Albert E. Unger,
'51A; Jack A. Vealey, '51; Walter
D. Webb, 151D; and James L. Wil-
liams, '51E.
Read and Use
The Daily Classifieds

"K""

27Ihe 11ickgran
GOTH11C FILM
.cie1tj
invites all its former members to a meeting on
Monday for the purpose of scheduling this year's
series, and to see "GRAND ILLUSION".

.
1
a.

I

SAME TIME

SAME PLACE

'* * * * *

- ATE
4~LU 11

be
Sure!'
be
Safe!.

FIRE HAZARD-However interesting the .book might be, Judy
Raub, '51, is committing a major faux pas in the matter of fire
ettiquet. In case the engraving is cloudy, that's a cigarette in her
right hand.
Local Fire Chief Wrns

Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
at
BARGAIN* PRICES

Careless use of cigarettes, par-
ticularly in bed, is an excellent
way to shorten one's life expect-
ancy, Ann Arbor Fire Chief Ben
Zahn warned as National Fire Pre-
vention Week drew to a close.
Smoking in bed and near com-
bustible fluids along with careless
disposal of cigarettes probably
causes a majority of home fires
SRA Retreat
BeginsToday
Activities sponsored by the Stu-
dent Religious Association for the
weekend will include an intercul-
tural retreat and an interguild
workshop.
Those going on the retreat will
leave Lane Hall at 5 p.m. today
for the Detroit Recreational Camp
to spend a weekend of discussion
and social activities among people
of different cultural backgrounds.
Students and faculty members will
air problems of current mutual in-
terest.
Crisfer on Radio
The University will receive dou-
ble honors tonight when Prof. H.
0. Crisler, head of the athletic
department, will appear on the
radio broadcast, "20 Questions,"
at 8 p.m. and Vaughn Monroe will
salute the University with the
playing of "The Victors" at 7:30
p.m.

in the United States, which this
year will claim nearly 7,000 men,
women and children, he revealed.
* * w
TO COMBAT the cigarette men-
ace in Ann Arbor, there is a city
ordinance against smoking in bed
in hotels, rooming houses and
other transient residences. .
"I've seen people sent to jail
for violating this law," observed
Zahn.
He said there were less than a
dozen fires reported in student
residences last year, none of them
major, and attributed the good
record to an inspection system
maintained by the city engineer's
office and the University.
ON THE NATIONAL SCENE,
however, the picture is not so
bright, he added. Underwriters'
statistics show that fire strikes
more than 400,000 homes each
year. That means that every 90.
seconds, day and night, an Ameri-
can home is struck by fire, causing
an estimated total loss of more
than $260,000,000 annually.
And nearly all of the fires
could be prevented through the
exercise of a little common sense,
Zahn emphasized.
He cited four simple rules, which
-if followed, would greatly reduce
the incidence of firerindomestic
residences:
1. Do not smoke near combusti-
bles.
2. Do not smoke in bed.
3. Keep electrical equipment and
wires in good repair, and avoid
overloading circuits; a penny in
a fuse box can cost a fortune.
4. Use cleaning fluids which are
non-explosive.
* s

Why worry about the safety of your money
while traveling? Travel in Peace. Buy trave-
ler's checks. Buy them at the Ann Arbor
Bank. There is a branch near you.
ANN ARBOR BANK
Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation
MAIN AND HURON STS.
STATE STREET in Nickles Arcade 1108 SOuTH UNIVERSITY

. _

II

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Today is your
lucky day
at

Continuing our
Friday 13th
Specials through

I

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--- --- _ -

Saturday

We carry a full line of

KOSHER DEC CTESSE

THE FIRE
wers calls to
ytar which
these simple
Zahn said.

DEPARTMENT ans-
countless fires every
could be avoided if
rules were followed,

113
Sizes 9-15; 10-44; 14-24
Rayon Crepes -- Failles - Gabardines
Wool Crepes and Jerseys
Many originally were 29.95

SALAMI CORNED
WEINERS

BEEF PASTRAMER
SMOKED FISH

FRESH DAILY

BREAD, BAGELS, ROLLS
the finest in
MEATS ... GROCERIES
FRESH and FROZEN VEGETABLES
We carry a full line of PEPPERIDGE Bread and Rolls

"It is impossible to estimate the
damage to property and the hu-
man misery which is caused by
carelessness and stupidity in not
taking simple precautions," he
added.
Fire Prevention Week is sponsor-
ed annually by the National Fire
Protection Association in coopera-
tion with fire departments across
the nation.
Ii

33 Fall Coats
at 33.00
Fleeces, Tweeds,
Gabardines, Chinchillas
Many have zip linings
Three-quarter, full length
Many sizes, 9 to 18
Originally priced to 45.00

33 Suits
Tweeds
Gabardines
Checks
Sizes 9-15, 10-40
Originally to 59.95

ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH
No. Division at Catherine
8:00 A.M.: Holy Communion.
9:00 A.M.: Holy Communion (followed by
Student Breakfast, Canterbury House).
10:00 A.M.: High School and Junior High Groups.
11:00 A.M.: Church School.
11:00 A.M.: Morning Prayer. Sermon by the
Rt. Rev. Harold Edward Wynn, D.D., the
Bishop of Ely.
12:15 P.M.: After-Service Fellowship, Canter-
bury House.
5:00 P.M.: Choral Evening Prayer.
5:45 P.M.: High School Supper and Program,
Page Hall.
5:45 P.M.: Canterbury Club Supper and Pro-
gram. Speaker: The. Bishop of Ely.
Wednesday (St. Luke), 7:15 A.M.: Holy Com-
munion (followed by Student Breakfast, Can-
terbury House).
Friday, 4:00-6:00 P.M.: Open House at Canter-
bury House.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
AND STUDENT CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
9:30 A.M.: Bible Study, "The Christian Religion
is Personal."
10:30 A.M.: Worship Service, with the sermon by
the pastor, "Why Christ Came."
5:30 P.M.: Supper-Program of Gamma Delta,
Lutheran Student Club. Business Meeting.
Tuesday at 9:15: Social Hour.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw
W. P. Lemon and W. H. Henderson, Ministers
Maynard Klein, Director of Music
#9:30 A.M.: Guild Seminar in Religion. Coffee
at 9:00 A.M.
10:45 A.M.: Morning Worship. Dr. Lemon's ser-
mon topic-"Major Patterns of Living."
5:30 P.M.: Westminster Guild supper.
6:30 P.M.: Guild meeting. Subject-"2ls God
Evident?".
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw Avenue
Edward H. Redman, Minister
10:00 A.M.: Adult Group-"The Anti-Subversion
Amendment" Pros and Cons.
11:00 A.M.: Services-Rev. Edward H. Redman
one "Tenets of Theism."
7:30 P.M.: Unitarian Student Group-"What's
On Your Mind?" a program of self-expression
for fun and better acquaintanceship.

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State & Williams
Minister: Rev. Leonard A. Parr
Student Ministry: Rev. H. L. Pickerill;
Mrs. "George Bradley
Director of Music: Wayne Dunlap
Organist: Howard R. Chase
9:30 A.M.: Intermediate Church School.
10:45 A.M.: Kindergarten and Primary Church
School
10:45 A.M.: Public Worship. Sermon: "The
Liberating Vision."
6:00 P.M.: Student Guild of the Congregational,
Disciples, and Evangelical and Reformed
Churches dinner. Mr. C. Bushnell Olmsted,
who worked with the'World Student Relief in
Germany, will speak on "Displaced Persons in
the Christian World."
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST, Scientist
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
11:00 A.M.:. Sunday Morning Services.
Oct. 15-Doctrine of Atonement.
9:30 A.M.: Sunday School.
11:00 A.M.: Primary Sunday School during the
morning service.
8:00 P.M. Wednesday: Testimonial Service.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street where the Bible and all authorized
Christian Science literature may be read, bor-
rowed, or purchased.
This room is open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 11 A.M. to 5 P.M. Please notice
the time has been changed from 11:30 to 11
o'clock.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed
Churches of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev. Leonard Verduin, Director
Phone 3-4332
10:00 A.M.: Morning Worship, Rev. Thomas Van
Erden, Pastor of Broadway Christian Reformed
Church of Grand Rapids, Michigan.
7:30 P.M.: Evening Service, Rev. Van Erden.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
120 South State Street
Dwight S. Large, Erland J. Wangdahl,
Joe A. Porter, Ministers
10:45 A.M.: Worship, "But Christian Love is
Different," Dr. Large preaching.
5:30 P.M.: Student Supper and Social Hour.
6:30 P.M.: Vespers, "Religion in Education,"
Mrs. Lena Vincent, speaker.
Welcome to Wesley Foundation Rooms - Open
Doily.

*I

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Open Sunday 10 A.M. - 1 P.M. Daily 8 - 6
FRATERNITY MARKET

1308 South University

Phone 2-1791

E
S i
8 A ' s

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1111

13 Suits at 23.00
Originally to 49.95
100% Wool Gabardines & Checks - Sizes 9-18
At 8.135 At 5.13
All reg. priced 8.95 Dresses Group of Better Hats
Many were to 16.95 all types
Crepes, Gabardines, Wools Some originally to 10.95
Group of Better Hats Better Crepe Blouses,
Originally to 12.95 long and short sleeves
(Any grou> of 3, Group of Skirts
3.13 Sale Items) Better Costume Jewelry
At 3.13
" HATS: Group of felts, velours, velvets

THE FLIGHT ROOM
overlooking
1900 ACRE WILLOW RUN AIRPORT

You are cordially
invited to attend a
FREE LECTURE
entitled
"Christian Science:
The Revelation of
Spiritual Law"
by
PAUL STARK SEELEY, C.S.B.
of Portland, Oregon
Member of the Board of Lec-
tureship of The Mother Church,
The First Church of Christ,
Scientist, in Boston,
Massachusetts.

hI

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Michigan League Building
North University Avenue

LUTHERAN STUDENT ASSOCIATION
(National Lutheran Council)
1304 Hill Street
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor

BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL AND
REFORMED CHURCH
423 South Fourth Ave.
Theodore R. Schmale. D.D.

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