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October 12, 1950 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-12

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Illiui.6DAY, OCIOL'i'n iz, 1030

'U'Offers Aid
In finding
Employment
Job-hunting .can be simplified
for seniors, graduates; and faculty
members looking for permanent
employment if they register with
the Bureau of Appointments next
week.
The registration program is di-
vided into two classifications, the
Educational and the General
Placement. Those interested in
procuring employment in the field
of education, whether in a teach-
ing or administrative capacity,
may register with the Bureau at
4 p.m. Monday in the Rackham
Bldg., T. Luther Purdom, bureau
director, said.
THE GENERAL Placement reg-
re-istration is open to anyone on
campus seeking employment, in-
cluding those in schools other
than education.
The only exceptions are doc-
tors, dentists, and lawyers, who
are referred to their particular
schools for assistance. Notices of
scholarships and fellowships are
also handled through the Bu-
reau, Purdom said.
Purdom will explain the func-
tion of the Bureau in relationship
to job opportunities at both the
Monday and Tuesday meetings.
Early registration of job-seeking
seniors, graduates, and faculty
members is necessary because of
the demand received from em-
ployers for available applicants.
Summer employment registration
will be handled by the Bureau at
a later date, Purdom announced.
Criticize Ban
On Portrait
Of Robeson
BQSTON-(P)-The banning of
a, portrait of Paul Robeson from
an-exhibition of famous Negroes
was described today by the chair-
man of the local display commit-
tee as "regrettable and political."
'Mayor John B. Hynes barred the
actor-singer's portrait from being
exhibited in any public building in
Boston on the ground that "his!
philosophies are destructive to the
principles of our land."
"THE ISSUE of color," he add-
ed, "has no significance in this
case whatever."
William G. Dooley, chairman
of the exhibit committee and di-
rector of education at the Bos-
ton Museum of Fine Arts, chal-
lenged the mayor's action. -
"While the committee intends to
cooperate in every instande in pre-
senting this ,Negro hall of fame,"
he said, .I think it is regrettable
thiat politics is entering into it."
ROBESON ISSUED a statement
in New York saying "the mayor of
machine-ridden Boston" was at-
tempting to make headlines by
"forbidding the free citizens of
the proud Bay State to look at my
picture."
"He shall have his headlines,"
Robeson added, "but if his aim
is to erase from the heart of the
people the kind of life for which
I work and speak, he shall not
have his objective."
The life-sized painting of the
singer is among a collection which
has been on tour of principal cit-

ies of the nation under the spon-
sorship of the Harmon Founda-
tion.
The Foundation said the exhibit
was designed "to lead to better
understanding among r a ci a 1
groups."
Rondestvedt Gets
Research Grant
Christian Rondestvedt, Jr., of
the chemistry department, has
been selected to do a special re-
search study under a grant of the
Research Corporation of New York
City.
This is one of sixty-two grants
recently awarded by the corpora-
tion for study in universities and
colleges throughout the country.
Rondestvedt will investigate the;
reaction of dienophiles with
momoolefins.

I I
iF U

Dawson,
. . .

Meader

Explain

Platforms

.4

Local Candidates Vie for House Seat

. . .*

-Courtesy Ann Arbor News
GEORGE MEADER
Iran's Shalt
WillMarry
'U' Visitor Betrothed
In RoyalCeremony
TEHERAN, Iran - (/P) -- The
smiling Shah of Iran, Reza Pah-
levi, placed a diamond engagement
ring on the finger of his European-
educated bride-to-be yesterday in
a traditional Persian bethrothal
ceremony before the royal family.
It was a big day for the pretty,
19-year-old Saroya Esfandiari,,
who left a finishing school in
Switzerland only a few days ago
to plunge into the social whirl of
the court at Tehran.
* * *
THE COUPIkE-the Shah will be
31 on Oct. 26-received members
of the court including his brother,
Prince Mahmoud Reza Pahlavi in
the glittering hall of mirrors of
the marble palace. The Prince
graduated last June from tlje Uni-
versity School of Business Admin-
istration.
-T h e Shah made headlines
throughout the state when he vis-
ited his brother here last Novem-
ber. h
One by one member of the
royal family, court funetionna-
ries and government officials fil-
ed past, to kiss the Shah's hand
and wish him happiness.
The future empress, poised and
dignified, was dressed entirely in
white satin lame. She and the
Shah-he wore the dark blue uni-
form of Iran's air force replete
with decorations-posed for photo-
graphers for a fullhalf hour.
The Shah met his future bride
two years ago at a party in Paris.
She flew here last Saturday with
the Shah's sister, the Princess
Chains.
The young Shah was di-
vorced from Empress Fawiza
about two years ago.

By VERNON EMERSON
Verbal nails were driven into
the platforms of the second con-
gressional district candidates yes-
terday as they outlined their pro-
grams to The Daily.
Prof. John P. Dawson, Demo-
cratic candidate for the office,
and George Meader, Republican
contestant, described their gen-
eral programs and went into a
few of the finer points of their
campaigns.
SUMMED UP, Prof. Dawson
said he plans to give his support
to the administration, and Meader
attacked and outlined a further
attack on the Truman set-up.
"I would like to get on an in-
vestigating committee--specially
one investigating the affairs of
the executive branch," Meader
said. He feels qualified for this
type of work as he has served as
counsel for two congressional in-
vestigating groups.
"Such activities can build foun-
dations for proper legislation,"
Meader claimed. But he noted that
he would also aim at limiting new
Federal activities for which "there
is no burning need now."
* * *
ON THE other hand, Prof. Daw-
son explained that he has been a
Democrat for a long time, believes
in the President's program and
will support it.
"The charge that Democratic
policies are socialistic is neither
fair nor truthful. This is mere-
ly another instance of the use
of scare words," Prof. Dawson
remarked.
As for pet projects Prof. Daw-
son did not have any, although he
said he hopes to secure a place
on the House Foreign Relations
Committee.
But Meader outlined a proposal
King Defends
British Bank
Nationalization
There is no indication that the
Bank of England has been pollut-
ed by nationalization, nor that
the treasury is taking advantage
of the commercial banks in Eng-
land, Wilfred T. C. King, editor
of The Banker, said yesterday.
"In fact, there is no serious op-
position to the nationalization
move," King said. "The Bank of
England is the first nationalized
industry under the Labor govern-
ment."
King added that thie nationali-
zation of the Bank of England was
purely a political move.
"People who held stock in the
bank were not cheated when the
government took over," he said.
"The price paid for their stocks
by the Labor government was
higher than the market price had
ever been before. The Bank of
England is the British equivalent
of the Federal Reserve Board
here.
This was the second of two lec-
tures by King, who spoke yes-
terday on the Marshall Plan.
Meinke Will Speak

he has already drawn up for a 12
man investigating commission to
determine why American capital
is not able to find its way into
foreign economies and build up
backward areas.
* * *
MEADER, WHO also hopes to
land a post on the Foreign Rela-
tions group, criticized the Presi-
dent's Point Four set-up as in-
effective.
"I have no confidence that the
executive branch will really
work to end barriers that keep
American capital and know-
how from going abroad. And
Congress hasn't displayed suf-
ficient interest in the problem.
It is proper that a Hoover Com-
mission type organization, based
on private enterprise, do the
Job."
MEADER DECLINED to go into
specific issues and controversial
issues.
"It would mean that I would
be pigeon-holed to 'yes' or 'no'
answers, whereas I believe such
issues should be studied in de-
tail by members of Congress."
Meader did say that he is in
favor of the thinking behind the
McCarren Communist Control
bill.
HOWEVER, he said that he is
not too sure that the present mea-
sure is the best way of handling
the problem.
"The bill must be adminis-
tered fairly, and must make sure
that there are no Communists
in government employ," he said.
Prof. Dawson said of the same
measure that he would favor de-
tention provisions of the Mc-
Carren Bill, but would seek eli-
mination of registration provi-
sions.
THE CANDIDATES clashed in
their thinking on Federal aid to
education.
Prof. Dawson said that he fa-
vors the Senate proposalt call-
ing for Federal aid to educa-
tion granted to the states on a
matching basis.
But Meader is in favor of leav-
ing the matter entirely up to
states and, in particular, local
agencies. He said that they should
raise their own school funds as
they would be paying taxes into
the Federal treasury for school
grants anyway.
"This would especially hurt tax
export states like Michigan who
would have to support school sys-
tems in places like Mississippi," he
pointed out.

He said that if Federal aid is
needed it should be given with-
out further extension of Federal
control.
* *$ *
STATE CONTROL was again
called for by Meader in regard to
a fair employment practices com-
mission. As it is, he said, the gov-
ernment is attacking an important
problem in the wrong way.
But Prof. Dawson came out in
favor of President Truman's
FEPC legislation as opposed to
the voluntary plan okayed by
Congress earlier in the year.
Prof. Dawson upheld all of the
civil rights measures suggested by
the President -- anti-lynch, FEPC
and anti-poll tax action.
AND HE WARNED that because
of the world situation we can ex-
pect rough going for a long time.
He said re would support a
three million man army as a
minimum for a long period to
come, although favoring exemp-
tion for college men of good
scholastic standing.
"When the defense program
produces shifts in our society, I
favor Federally administered rent
control," he said and predicted
that such controls will probably
be needed before the year's end.
Prof. Dawson said that he would
support immediate passage of an
excess profits tax, and pointed out
that higher taxes on all levels will
be necessary.
* * *
ALTHOUGH HE did not favor
extending Marshall Plan aid be-
yond 1952, Prof. Dawson said that
this country must help Europe
back on its feet by lower tariffs,
reductions of European expendi-
tures for imports and develop-
ment of non-European areas
through Point Four.
"When it comes to garrisoning
Europe, the people there should
assume the primary burden of
defending themselves, although
America needs to contribute
troops."
He said that German manpow-
er is clearly needed in a European
defense establishment, although
guarantees must be given against
revival of German power that
threatens the peace.
As for world organization, Prof.
Dawson said he did not favor the
setting up of a new organization
excluding Russia. "We must
strengthen the Assembly and car-
ry out more regional agreements
such as the Atlantic Pact."
And how did the candidates sum
up their chances of being elected?
Each said, "I have no predictions."

Report Low
BAdVote
A meager 25% of eligible voters
in the business administration
school turned out yesterday to
elect six candidates to the twelve-
member Business Administration
Council.
Barbara Hansen, '51BAd, was
elected automatically. Miss Han-
sen, the only woman running for
office, won a post by virtue of a
regulation stating that one woman
must be elected irregardless of the
number of votes she polls.
The five men elected to the
Council were: Anthony Cote,
Grad.; Roger Easton, '51BAd;
Harry Hawkins, '51BAd; James
Huger, '51BAd; and Ralph G.
Jarl, Grad.
Art Exhibits
On Display
University art students will be
able to view two exhibits in uni-
versity art galleries during the
next few weeks.
On display in the Rackham gal-
leries today through Nov. 2 will
be the works of three Ann Arbor
artists.
Sponsored by the Ann Arbor Art
Association, the exhibit will show
the paintings of Mino Winslow
and Albert Decker, and the sculp-
ture and ceramics of Harvey Lit-
tleton.
Beginning Saturday in Alumni
Memorial Hall, the University Mu-
seum of Art will display more than
60 prints and original copper
plates by Prof. Mauricio Lasansky
of the University of Iowa.

l
~

BROWN
CORDOVAN
by Edgerto
Edgerton has combined all
the richness of Brown
'Cordovan with smart wing
tip styling to create a
sparkling new style. No
matter what kind ofweath-
ther - your feet willstay
comfortae in t ese Edger-
ton Brown Cordovans.

-Courtesy Ann Arbor News
PROF. JOHN P. DAWSON
Script fWr/it er
Called to Duty'
William Bender, jr., script writer
for the University Broadcasting
Service since April, 1949, has been
called to active duty. by the U.S.
Air Force.
A public information specialist,
Bender was among those recalled
for special assignment by the 10th
air force at the end of September.
He will report this week to head-
quarters of the Air Material Com-
mand in Dayton, Ohio.
Bender served as a captain in
the Air Corps during World War
II.
Read and Use
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