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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 20, 1950 - Image 19

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- - ~"

~O9~*
'HL MICHIGAN DAILY

--v

ODERN MEDICINE AT LOW COST:
Health Service Cares For U' Students
9 * * * * ** k j

Looking after the health of
Michigan's 20,000 students is the
job of the University Mealth Ser-
vice-one of the first and best stu-
dent health centers in the U.S.
The Health Service provides
necessary medical care and treat-
ment without charge in its build-
ing a half block off campus on
Fletcher St.
BEFORE A STUDENT can reg-
ister for the first time at the Uni-
versity, he or she must receive a
thorough physical examination,
usually lasting about two hours.
X-rays are also taken to check for
tuberculosis.
Records are made of any de-
fects in posture, of past illnesses
and minor complaints. But it is
entirely up to the student
whether or not he takes ad-
vantage of Health Service fa-
cilities.
Each student is assigned to a
physician medical adviser whom
he may feel free to call on for
advice or treatment of a cold,
headache or minor symptoms.
** *
IF THE SERVICES of a spe-
cialist are required, the student
will be referred to one of the
Health Service's speciqlly equipped
departments, which include:
Minor surgery (cases requiring
intensive surgery are referred
, to the University Hospital).
A physiotherapy clinic for ul-
tra-violet light treatments, and
with whirlpool baths to aid stu-
dents to regain the use of limbs
kept in casts or stiff for other
reasons.
A mental hygiene department
with a full time psychiatrist tak-
ing care of situations ranging from
questions of general personality
adjustment to psychological and
emotional problems of a more
complicated nature.
* * *
AN EYE CLINIC that offers
complete refractions and then en-
ables students to buy glasses made
by private colpanies at significant
savings.
A dental clinic for examina-
tion and treatments (most den-
tal repair work is referred to
the Dental School or private
dentists).
A clinic nurses station for dress-
ings, general treatments, and+

HEALTH SERVICE-The pace to go for medical advice and treatment is a half block off campus
opposite the League on Fletcher Street.
* ** * * *

emergencies that also handles vac-l
cinations and injections. Should a
student be involved in a local ac-
cident and taken by friends or
police to an Ann Arbor hospital,
the Health Service will in certain
cases carry the bill.
Clinics of dermatology,- diet
therapy, and ear, nose, and throat.
Student patients are never used
as clinical subjects for 'medical
student instruction or expei'imen-
tation.
* * *
A 60-BED INFIRMARY is lo-
cated on the third floor' ,of the
Health Service. However, Dr. War-
ren E. Forsythe, director of the
Service, pointed out that it is sel-
dom that more than half the beds
are used at any one time.
Cases that cannot be handled
by the Health Service are gener-
ally referred to the 1,029-bed Uni-
versity Hospital. In cases of seri-
ous illness parents are notified'by
special delivery letters.
In the "good old days" when a
student became ill in his room, his
roommate usually provided all the
medical and nursing attention
which he might receive..
* * *
IF THINGS GOT BAD, the
roommate usually put his buddy
on a train and sent him home.

If someone came down with a
contagious disease and an epi-
demic developed, the college us-
ually declared an unexpected
two-week holiday. No students,
no epidemic.
The first University Health
Service was organized in 1913. It
was staffed by three physicians, a
nurse, a clerk, and had a budget
of $10,000 with which to assist the
University's 5,520 students.
* ~* *
LOCATED ON the third floor of
the modern $500,000 four-story
Health Service building first open-
ed in 1940 is an infirmary with 20
full or part time nurses, where stu-
dents requiring bed care are hos-
pitalized.
STUDENT ELIGIBILITY for
Health Service facilities is auto-:
matic with the taking of four
hours or more of credit hours (in-
cluding fellowship teachers), while
those with less than four hours
can obtain privileges by paying a
$10 fee at the beginning of a
semester.
Though faculty and student's
wives are not included in this
eligibility list, they may be given
certain injections at the HealthI
Service.

Services offered to students
without charge include 15 days of
general hospitalization during each
semester at a daily expense allow-
ance of $9.75, surgeon fees and
operating expenses for acute surgi-
cal conditions, simple drugs and
dressings, and medical atteption at
the various university summer
camps.
* * *
CHARGES (in most cases at re-
duced rates) are made for special
nursing, some hospital service,
tests for refraction, some drugs,
physician room calls, x-rays, den-
tal fillings, most dermatology and
allergy treatments, and certain
uses of physiotherapy.
That the Health Service ranks
high among health programs of
its type set up by universities to
provide medical care for students
is shown by a look at its guest
book.
Not only does it include the
names of people from all over the
United States, but doctors and
educators who come from Brazil.
India, Finland, New Zealand, and
other parts of the world to study
the Health Service setup, and then
return to their country to organize
similar health programs.

University
Bands Plan
Fall Audition
Auditions for positions in the
University Bands will be held dur-
ing registration week at Harris
Hall with the first meeting sched-
uled for Sunday, Sept. 17.
The Bands, which are active
from registration to Commence-
are regarded as among the finest
ment, are regarded as among the
finest in the country.
DURING FOOTBALL season,
the spotlight is concentrated on
the celebrated Marching Band,
but after the traditional Ohio
State-Michigan tilt, the Symphon-
ic Band presents concerts and the
Varsity Band performs at home
basketball contests and in the
spring, in concerts.
First-semester freshmen are
eligible to participate in the
Bands' activities.
Those interested should write
for applications and further in-
formation to Prof. William D. Re-
velli, conductor, Harris Hall.
THE MARCHING BAND, which
this year will make the journey to
New York for the Michigan-Army
football game among its road trips,
will also play at all home football
games.
The Symphonic Band, though
practicing during the football
season, begins intensive work in
November. It usually has a
membership of about 100 pieces,
differing somewhat in size and
instrumentation f r o m t h e
Marching Band. Membership is
open to women.
Equipped with a comprehensive
library of concert literature, the
Symphonic Band performs many
new compositions and arrange-
ments as soon as they are publish-
ed.
* * *
THE VARSITY BAND, under
the direction of Jack K. Lee, pre-
sents several concerts in Ann Ar-
bor during the spring term, in ad-
dition to its performances at home
basketball games.
It plays many of the numbers
which the prospective music
teacher will use with his own
band when he goes out to teach,
and serves as a training ground
for those students not yet cap-
able of performing in the more
select Symphonic Band.
It also serves to give many stu-
dents a valuable musical experi-
ence, according to Prof. Revelli.
HISTORICALLY, the Michigan
Band dates back perhaps as far.
as 1844, when a nine-piece en-
semble assisted in the chapel ser-
vices. The first group to call itself
the Michigan Band was originally
Les Sans Souci, organized in 1859.

MARCHING BAND-The band forms a shield at halftime in a Michigan football game, part of a
of its spectacular displays.
International Center Aids Students

THE ENGLISH Language Serv-
ice, in addition to other langu-
age services, is one of -the Center's
most important aids in helping
a strange land. It provides both a
foreign studenits to make the dif-
ficult adjustment to their work in
general orientation with reference
to American customs and the or-
life, and a specific orientation with
ganization of American college
Students May
Borrow Prints
Of Paintings
If you feel that you need a dash
of color to liven up your room,
the Student Loan Print Collection
has several hundred reproductions
of oil and water color paintings
which are guaranteed to improve
even the drabest of walls.
The prints are available to any
student at a rental fee of 50 cents
per print for the semester. How-
ever, there is a limit of one print
per student.
CURRENTLY AVAILABLE are
many interesting reproductions of
works by such artists as Renoir,
Degas, Van Gogh, Picasso, . and
Winslow Homer.
In addition, the library offers
works by the traditional old mas-
ters of Europe.

reference to the professional fields
in which the student is to study.
Ramifications of the Inter-
national Center are the vari-
ous foreign students' clubs -
Chinese, German, Turkish, etc.
- which are designed to ac-
quaint the student with those of
his own nationality. Each club
International Student Associa-
annually sends a delegate to the
tion.
To augment the program com-
plete recreational arrangements
are provided. These includes par-
ties, picnics, movie programs, mu-
sic programs, and dances, all of
which both foreign students and
others are invited to participate
in.
In a very real sense, the Center

the University to its students fi
stands a gesture of welcome fi
other lands. Most certainly, ot
students are invited to particip
in its activities.
Try FOLLETT'S First
USED BOOKS
BARGAIN PRICES

im

U

Welcome to Michigan
and Ann Arbor from .

I

B
BEER

KEG

LOOKING BACKWARD:
Haven Hall Blaze Enlivens Examination Week

DRIVE THROUGH.

> i

(Continued from Page 11)
May 8. An open petition address-
ed to the chairman of medical
school admissions. and circulated
by the Committee to End Discrim-
ination attracted large crowds of
students on the diag. The petition
asked that the information per-
taining to religion, nationality
and a request for a photograph
required on Medical School ap-
plications be eliminated.
May 9. Walter Rea, Associate
Dean of Students, was honored at
a surprise dinner for his 23 years
of working with students in the
Office of Student Affairs.
May 12. President Ruthven
launched a verbal attack on a
State Legislature move to slash
next year's University appropri-
ation to $11,572,945, representing
a substantial cut from Gov. Wil-
liams recommended $12,500,000
appropriation.
May 14. The showing of the
film, "The Birth of a Nation,"
scheduled by the speech depart-
ment, met with strong objections
from a student-faculty group be-
cause it was anti-Negro.
May 16. The speech department
cancelled its showing of "The

Birth of a Nation" because of pro-
tests from a student-faculty
group branding the film as "slan-
derous" and "viciously anti-Ne-
gro."
May 17. The State Senate ap-
proved the decreased University
appropriation grant, which arous-
ed Democrats struggled in vain to
increase. The cut came as a part
of the Republican-sponsored eco-
nomy drive aimed at reducing Gov.
Williams' proposed state budget by
$73,000,000.
The Student Legislature :of .the
University sanctioned the' show-
ing of "The Birth of a Nation" by
the Michigan Forum, as student
letters, both for and against the
showing poured into The Dlaily.
May 18. The Gothic Film Soci-
ety reversed a plan of showing
"The Birth of a Nation" to its
members although the SL did not
abandon its plan to present the
movie.
May 22. The Museum of Modern
'Art in New York refused to re-
lease "The Birth of a Nation" for
the use of the Student Legislature
because the SL is not a profession-
al film study group intending to
show the movie as an educational
project. This development was not
a retraction of the SL's initial

stand against the suppression of
the showing.
May 24. James H. Robertson,
newly appointed assistant dean of
the literary college, announced
that he would attempt a "human-
ization of the literary college rules
and regulations."
June 6. Fire-prevention talk
and action proved misdirected
when the interior of the Univer-

sity's 87-year-old Haven Hall was
completely destroyed in a $3,000,-
000 blaze. The fire raged for four
hours while professors saw years
of their work disappear in the
flames. Several professors lost ir-
replaceable research data and
master's these and doctoral dis-
sertations weer destroyed. The
origin of the fire was undetermin-
ed.

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ACCOUNTING - TYPING
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Single Subjects or Complete Courses
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NEW and USED
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Plan to spend your leisur
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