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September 20, 1950 - Image 17

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-09-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

1950

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

- I-.

god Bank

FOUR ALUMNI-AT TOP:
Administrative Officers Run'U'

Has Valuable
Transfusions

There's a bank down at the
University Hospital.
But unlike most banks, this or-
ganization deals withna substance
far, more valuable and precious
than money-Blood.
THE BLOOD BANK is a system
through which a person in need
of a transfusion can obtain whole
blood by borrowing the required
amount from a "storage vault" at
the Hospital.
Blood taken from the bank
must be replaced in one of three
ways:
:First, the patient may have his
friends or relatives donate blood
to replasce the amount that he has
used1.
BUT IF THE patient does not
have anyone who is able to make
a donation, he may turn to one
of the many church, social or fra-
ternal groups which make volun-
teer- deposits to help supply ever
ir creasing blood needs.
The third way of retiring the
loan_ is by buying blood which
.s replaced by professional don-
ors obtained by the Hospital..
4n this case the patient is
charged at the same rate as
the Hospital must pay the don-
Professional donors must be us-
ed to pick up the places of slack
when deposits are low and also to
replace rare blood types.
FOR THIS PURPOSE, the Hos-
petal relies on the contributions of
fron 300 to 500 students a month.
They. must be between theages
otZ 21:-and 50 (parental consent is
needed for those between 18 and
20). and in good health.

Responsibility for running the
University rests upon the shoul-
ders of a quartet of experienced
men-all alumni of the institution
they operate.
The top-ranking administrators
include President Alexander G.
Ruthven, Provost James P. Adams,
and Vice-Presidents Marvin L.
Niehuss and Robert P. Briggs.
* * *
BEFORE ASSUMING the pres-
idency of the University, Dr. Ruth-
ven distinguished himself as a
zoologist and as director of the
University Museums for many
years.
Dr. Ruthven received his
Ph.D. degree from the Univer-
sity in 1906, and has been a
member of its faculty ever since.
He rose through the ranks in
the zoology department, begin-
ning as an instructor in 1906 and
becoming chairman of the de-
partment in 1927.
From 1913 until 1929 he served

I

* * *

Vice-President. Niehuss received
his AB degree at the University in
1925, and a Bachelor of Laws de-
gree in 1930. While still in Law
School, Niehuss served as an in-
structor of economics in the School
of Business Administration.
He has been associated with
the University most of the time
since, as an instructor and pro-
fessor of law, and since 1944 as
Vice-President.
During the war, he directed the
University's Division of Emergency
Training, which worked with the
Navy V-12 and the Army ASTP
programs on campus.
* * *
AFTER GRADUATING from the
University in 1925, Vice-President
Briggs was professor and then
dean in the business administra-
tion school of Kansas Wesleyan
University until 1927.
He joined the University's fac-
ulty in that year, and since then
has served as professor of ac-
counting and economics.
.A distinguished accountant,
Briggs did much accounting work
for governmental agencies during
the war years.
He became a University Vice-
President in 1945.

II

It is with genuine pride that
we point to last year's record!

I1

3 £~ua IJeI4p~ ay

11

i

/>

$1.50

PRESIDENT RUTHVEN
* * *
as director of the Museum of Zool-
ogy. This position served as a
springboard to his appointment as
Director of University Museums in
1922. He kept this post until 1936.
In 1928, Dr. Ruthven served as
Dean of Administration, and in
1929 he was chosen to head the
University as its sixth president.
PROVOST Adams received his
AB degree from the University in
1919 and his master's degree here
in 1921. In the same year he
joined the staff of Brown Univer-
sity as an assistant professor of
economics. He subsequently be-
came chairman of Brown's eco-
nomics department.
Henbecame vice-president of
Brown in 1931, a position which
he held until 1944. During the
first semester ofethe 1936-37
academic year he served as
Brown's acting president.
He returned to the University in
1945 as provost. As provost, he
serves as the president's adminis-
trative assistant - his "executive
officer."
Besides his work in educational
institutions, Provost Adams has
taken an active interest in public
affairs. He has served as arbitrater
for labor disputes, and as a mem-
ber of various welfare organiza-
tions.
A NATIVE OF Louisville, Ky.,

I

:,
,;
c::; .
Yc;ss+ r .

During the forthcoming year we pledge every
effort to continue to give you even better ser-
vice and better food at the lowest possible
prices.

11

*As this goes to press the Korean situation is violently up-
setting price levels, making it difficult to establish rates for
the fall semester. However, you are promised that we shall
continue to give the greatest food values in Ann Arbor.
and sponsored by economy - minded

CLUB 211, organized

students, has brought to its hundreds of members excellent,

PROVOST ADAMS

man-sized meals at the

lowest prices

in Ann Arbor.

IOOKING BACKWARD:
iFreedom of Speech Hotly
Discussed at University

IN 1949.50 CLUB 211 OFFERED:

(Continued from Page 10)
nette, of the School of Business
Adinistration agreed to debate
with avowed Communist Herbert
J.i Phillips on a Michigan Forum
d bate program, tentatively sche-
d led for April 25.
April 6. Charles H. Peake, as-
staut -dean of the literary col-
I ge, was appointed dean of Knox
Colege at Galesburg, Illinois, end-
iig a thirteen-year association
with the University.
April 17. The University Lecture
Committee banned the proposed
Iebate, on "Communism vs. Capi-
ta!lm"', which was to include Her-
bert J. Phillips, Communist teach-
er who was fired from the Univer-
-t sity of Washington. The decision
barred any member of the Com-
minist Party from speaking in
University buildings. Meanwhile,
stuidents prepared sharply-worded
protests to the Lecture Committee
and Phillips, in New York, denied
that he had ever "urged the modi-
fication or destruction of the gov-
ernment of. the United States by
violence," in reply to the decision
whic invoked a Board of Regents
by law.forbidding any address that
urges such action.
April 21. A mile-long parade of
floats, balloons and five marching
bands opened the Michigras week-
end, which had been advertised by
stunts, clowns, and the escape of
a violent maniac from the frater-
nity house where he had been im-
prisoned since he had been
brought to Ann Arbor from a
"West Coast agency" as a freak-
show attraction.
April 22. The annual Phi Beta
Kappa dinner sponsored a talk by
Elner Davis who stressed the res-
ponsibility of scholars to pass more
of their knowledge on to the gen-
eral public in a form which the
public can understand. He de-
clred that "those who have a su-

perior ability to discriminate be-
tween probable truth and almost
certain falsehood have a special
responsibility which is needed es-
pecially in a time of peril" such as
this.
April 25. An ad hoc committee
formed to sponsor the Herbert J.
Phillips debate announced he
would speak in a State Street cafe-
teria. An opponent for Phillips had
not yet been obtained, since Prof.
Wernette declined to participate
"in a debate that wasn't officially
approved by the University."
April 26..Prof. Preston W. Slos-
son of the history Department
agreed to debate with Phillips, al-
though University officials still
barred the event from campus.
April 27. A record-breaking total
of almost 8,000 students went to
the polls to register the largest all-
campus vote in the history of the
University.,
A crowd estimated at 2,000 peo-
ple packed the State Street site of
the debate between Herbert J.
Phillips and Prof. Slosson. Only
some 400 succeeded in cramming
their way into the cafeteria where
the debate was held, but police de-
nied permission to broadcast the
debate over a loud speaker to the
crowd outside.
April 29. Many student dwellings
outside University residence,halls
were called unsafe, by local fire
inspector Thomas Hunter.
Lloyd S. Woodburne, associate
dean of the college of Literature,
Science and the Arts, was appoint-
ed dean of the University ofWash-
ington's College of Arts and Sci-
ences, ending a University asso-
ciation of 24 years; both as stu-
dent and administrator.
May 3. The aims of the Michi-
gan Memorial-Phoenix Project
were broadcast all over the world
on the government short wave
station "Voice of America".
See HAVEN HALL, Page 13

VICE-PRESIDENT NIEHUSS
Travel Office
Aids Students'
EuropeTrips
A travel office designed to aid
students making trips abroad is
located in the Office of Student
Affairs.
It is run by the National Stu-
dent Association Committee of the
Student Legislature.
* * *
BSIDES SUPPLYING informa-
tion on the annual summer NSA
tours through Europe, the office
is the campus clearing house for
information on tours sponsored by
other groups.
The travel office also has the
facts on work camps and study
opportunities abroad.
More than 150 University stu-
dents were in Europe last summer.

6 days a week

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER

$9.00

6 0 0 0 S * 6 * S

LUNCH, DINNER
6 days a week

. . . $8.10

. . . . . .

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER

5 days a week

. . . . . $7.50

LUNCH, DINNER
5 days a week

$6.95

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 *

I1

SAMPLE

DAY'S

MENU

VICE-PRESIDENT BRIGGS

WELCOME STUDENTS
.. to...
HALLERS JEWELERS
Serving Michigan Since 18 5 8
DIAMONDS
ORANGE BLOSSOM RINGS
WATCHES
PARKER "51" PENS
CLOCKS - JEWELRY
WATCH & IEWELRY REPAIR

Our Trained
Cosmetician
~ hi~yo ....
cman elour
Comlee Lne o
M M"
Alakeup Problems
C ELIZABETH ARDEN ! HELENA RUBENSTEIN
L FRANCES DENNY 0 REVLON
' SCHIAPARELLI 0 HERB FARM

Choice of juice or fruit in season; cereal or egg; sweet roll or unlimited
toast, coffee, tea, or milk.

11

LUNCH:

Vegetable soup, grapefruit juice, or tomato juice; spaghetti and meat
sauce, braised beef with vegetables, country sausage with applesauce, chick-
en and rice, or cold plate; potatoes lyonnaise; peas and carrots, glazed onions
or buttered wax beans; cottage cheese-pineapple salad, tossed salad, sliced
tomatoes or perfection salad; unlimited bread; butter; fruit jello, Lombard
plums, spiced applesauce, or chocolate pudding; coffee, tea, or milk.

DINNER:

Cream of tomato soup, grapefruit juice or tomato juice; meat loaf with
tomato sauce, breaded pork chop, stuffed veal bird, baked Virginia ham, ,or
cold plate; whipped potatoes or mashed sweet potatoes; fresh frozen broccoli,
Harvard beets, or buttered whole-kernel corn; Manhattan salad, slicd toma-
toes, cottage cheese-peach salad, or tossed salad; unlimited bread; butter;
ice cream, homemade pie, fruit jello, fruit in season; coffee, tea, or milk.

BREAKFAST:

CLUB 211 gives you better food at lower prices because YOU
trot the price, the quality, and the quantity.

con-

FREE ICED TEA and COFFEE

to Club 211 Members

Every Afternoon 1:30-4:30, Monday through Saturday

-

III

m I-mmm m-mm-m

®

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