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October 08, 1950 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1950-10-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

*1

GEr EGrHT

THE MIChIGAN DAILY

SUibAY, OCTOl-M 9, 19950

.= =qmas ---------- --- ----

I

FANS iHAR M)A SED MUSICIANS:

T i-lidack Gridiron In Gala Pageant'
(.) * *. . . * * .*

COLLEGE ROUNDUP:
Berkeley Campus Tense
Over Loyalty Dismissals

fashion at your fingertipsI

Tn the biggest massed band per-
formance ever se in Ann Arbor
2,363 bandsmcn sw armed over theI
green gridircn at yesterday's half-
time show and turned the field
into a galaxy of color.
Featuring close-massed forma-
tions stretching 90 yards, from
one five-yard line to the other,
the second annual observance of
High School and Day overshad-
owed last year's performance.
* * *
THE HUGE demonstration drew
the biggest response of the day
outside of the helf-time score of
the Notre Dame-Purdue game and
the final report froni East Lan-
sing.
Yesterday n ning the thirty-
seven part1,7tinA hh s h1ol
bands rolle io nmn Ahor byI
bus for the one awl only group
rehearsal. Each band h 7pre-
viously received ^ n., rudfFons as
to where it wcl be in the mass
formations and what music
would be played.
After the morning rehearsal it
was up to the yoana bandsmen,
inany, of whom ere playing for
the first time in a big stadium be-
fore a college foot-:all audience.
* * *
WHILE ThE Mahing Eand
played in the center of the field
the high school bands streamed
out of the stands to form the let-
ters M-I-C-H facing the west
side of the stadium.

By DAVIS CRIPPEN
Things remained tense on the
University of, California campus
due to the still hot loyalty oath
fight, but elsewhere on the coun-
try's campuses affairs seemed to
be getting back their normal zani-
ness last week.
At Berkeley, the northern section
of the U. of C. academic senate
passed a resolution blasting the
"bare majority" of the university's
board of regents who "arbitrarily
dismissed faculty members ... and,
violated the principle of tenure."
* * *
AT THE SAME meeting, the
group also urged its members to
contribute at least two per cent of
their gross monthly wages to pro-
vide regular monthly salaries for
the non-signing faculty members.
At the University of Pitts-
burgh there was also a serious
situation-at least to one per-
son. Emil Mrkonic, a pre-law
senior, announced that he was
starting a crusade to clean up
gambling at Pitt.
Mrkonic, trying to prove that his
was no empty threat, claimed that
as a constable in nearby McKees-
port he had the power to do it.
"THE GAMBLING situation on
campus is degrading," reformer
Mrkonic trumpeted. He declared
that students use knowledge learn-
ed in such courses as economics in
attempts to beat football pools and
other sucker games.
U. of P. officials denied Mrkon-
ic's charges and said there were
no pools that they knew of in op-
eration at Pitt.
Commenting further on the
subject, Dean Charles B. Nut-
ting of Pitt's law school, pro-
phesied wryly that "I do not
think the University will stop

I

cause knowledge obtained can
teaching economics simply be-
be used to beat the football
pools."
After a bit of preliminary re-
forming, Mrkonic apparently re-
alized that his crusade was no one
man operation.
"It would be a good idea," he
suggested hopefully, "if the stu-
dents gave me some tips."
At last report, however, Mrkonic
was still tipless.
As fast and easy
as "setting" your hair!

"
tip-top top
for Fall
pi
4 j;

,

I

y 3 ;<i3>?>i;

-Daily-Carlisle Marshall
JUST A FEW OF THE SEVERAL HUNDRED HIGH SCHOOL BATON TWIRLERS
WHO APPEARED IN BAND DAY YESTERDAY

* * *
ing both ends of the huge for-
mation, filled the air with
flashing batons.
Mishaps occurred among thea
twirlers, but were taken in stride
with almost professional disdain.
* * *
THE SECOND formation by the
group was a huge U-S-A which
reversed direction and played to

* * * * * *
both sides of the stadium. Color Spectators, however, did not
guards from the bands marched miss the opportunity to see the
down the east sideline while the precision formations of the Uni-
majorettes strutted along the west. versity Marching Band, rated as
one of the best in the nation.
The entire pageant, which re- In pre-game ceremonies the
presented long detailed planning high-stepping musicians played
and organization was under the the "Star Spangled Banner," sa-
supervision of Prof. William D. luted Dartmouth College and swept
Revelli, conductor of University into a block M for the singing of
Bands. the "Yellow and the Blue."

.lj
S
{
k'

.. . .. ..

r

As the massed bangs played
and sang "The Victors," drum
majorettes and tw ers, flank-

-

I1

Psychology Clubs.
To Hear Speakers
The psychology colloquium will
hold its opening meeting at 4:15
p.m. tomorrow at Lane Hall.
Prof. John W. Atkinson will
speak on "The Achievement Mo-
tive."
At the opening meeting of the
psychology club, the undergradu-
ate psychology organization, Ro-
ger Heyns of the psychology de-
partment will speak on "Psychol-
ogy Faces Life."
The latter meeting will take
place at 7:15 p.m. tomorrow in
Rm. 3D of the Union.

the
PIN CURL
PERMANENT WAVE
Easy. Make pin curls with
Curlstick and special alloy
Bobbie-pins that cannot discolor"
or injure hair. So fast (yet safe),
some hair takes a permanent
in just a few minutes!
lovely. Oil-rich, secret-process
Spun-Cream waving lotion
conditions hair; results in
silk-soft waves.
only
complete s=u22c Ted Tao
jute Quarrf
On State
At Head of North U.

SWAGGER
FITTED

STRAIGHT
FUR TRIMMED

. ,
x

.VELVET COATS
in topper and full lengths
217 S. Main St. 9 Nickels Arca

I.

Your short-coat of the season is a double-breasted dandy,
cropped to the most practical, flattering length of alli
Team it correctly with your casuals... date in it, dote on
it every frosty Fall minute. Wear it forever, for it's
St. Marys famous, fuzzy-faced 100% wool that springs up
soft and spanking clean with just a gentle brushing (we
provide the brush). Inverted pleat and button-on belt at
back, 2-ways wonderful collar, a head-hugging hat to
booe! Red, camel, evergreen, royal, French blue, nude,
gold.
Ours exclusive in Ann Arbor $ 3500
Other styles to $45

de

A S __

Great Names
Team up with...
for campus class
games or fraternity
house stomps

Sacct to
A-Rating Coats, Suits
Dresses, Sportswear
n c4
and Accessories

Sacony o K
Jane Irwill
Berkeley o
Rondelle *

oret ® Catalina

I

* Lassie
Printzess
Debway

Henry Rosenfeld

.1

u $2? R*...NEW COUNTRY TWEEDS EkCLUSIVE
1. "n't you 'reamed of owning a precious Cashmere coat? Haven't you sighed over its
0os'ineos arA fragility? For just such a woman as you-KASHMOOR was created. It is
Cahma-,'s perfect double,...soft, divinely warm and feather-light. A blend of 80% wool
and al nyl'n, it outwars Cashmere by years... cost just a fraction of what you'd expect
to ay Country Twee'ls captures the elegant look and feel of new KASHMOOR in subtle
of the ever-wonderful classics...all with rich-looking hand-picked edges and
' A woo interlinings.
: e.'s Grey, Navy and Camel, sizes 10-16 . . . . . . $75.00

It's kick off time for the Coed to
choose her fashion majors. With
good lecture notes to take care of
the brains dept. -- and the right
clothes the looks dept. . . . you're
"in" on campus - You'll note plen-
ty of fashion's pet tweeds, flannels
and jerseys with velvet and plaid
accents.
Colors run riot, styles are exciting
in our All-American line up of
Campus clothes-and best of all-
they barely tug at the purse strings.

Y
Y
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;3
1

11

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